Translate

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Havana, Cuba as described by the commanding officer f the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1917


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Havana, Cuba. It was the first harbour where the coal bunker procedure was mechanized. The Havana Coal Company possessed large lighters fitted out with a coal lift comparable with the system of a bucket dredger. The buckets were fitted to a chain of which the ends were connected to each other. The buckets were emptied via a flexible iron tube into the loading ports of the bunkers. This loading went very fast although there was a problem with the arrangement of the bunkers on board of the Holland. The tube had to be moved when a bunker was full and this went considerable slow. On both sides of the ship was the coal loaded resulting in 480 tons in 8 hour or 60 ton/hour. 

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920. 

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917.

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Curacao, Dutch West Indies as described by the commanding officer of the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1917


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Curacao, Dutch West Indies. The ship was moored alongside the coal quay and via 2 gangways were baskets filled with 25-30 kilo coals carried by dock coolies. In around 8 net hours was in this manner 645 ton loaded or around 80 tons a hour. In the first hour went the loading much faster in contrary to the last hours.

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland visited La Luz, Gran Canaria in December 1916


Dutch Hr. Ms. Holland

Spanish Princesa de Asturias

The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. On the 13th she arrived at Vigo, continuing her voyage on the 19th towards Las Palmas/La Luz, Gran Canaria where she arrived on the 23rd, after bunkering coal she left the next day arrived at Curacao, Dutch West Indies on 7 January 1917 at 09.00 ‘’clock. At La Luz were warships no longer allowed to enter the inner harbour. There was however made an exception for the Holland under the excuse that the sea in the outer harbour was to heavy for bunkering. The major space in the inner harbour was now by 14 large German and Austrian steamships. Some time ordered the Spanish government those ships were to leave the roads where the major part had been lying since the outbreak of the war. When the Holland was in the outer harbour the Spanish ironclad Princesa de Asturias (2) lying departed in the morning of the 24th and replaced by the shortly afterwards arriving gunboat Laya.(3) With the commander of the Princesa de Asturias captain Francisco de Barredio y Mirandio were visits exchanged. Coal bunkering was by the Dutch commander as follows described. Prows loaded with coal sacks weighing around 100 kilo were lying waiting to be called. Between the prow and the ship to be loaded was a boat fitted out with 2 steam winches lying. This boat was able to lift 8 sacks of coal or about 800 kilo at once. On board was with the help of convenient carts the coal loaded in the bunkers and within 9 hours 554 ton coal bunkered.

Notes
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .
2. Of the Princesa de Asturias class armoured cruisers consisting of the Princesa de Asturias, Cataluna and Cardenal de Cisneros. Laid down by Arsenal de la Caracca, Spain on 23 September 1889, launched on 17 October 1896, completed on 10 June 1903 and stricken in December 1927.
3. Of the Recalde-class consisting of the Recalde, Laya, Bonifaz and Lauria. Laid down by SECN, Cartagena, Spain in December 1910, launched on 3 April 1912, completed in August 1912 and stricken in May 1940.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

Torpedoes trimmed in the Dutch East Indies according to the Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1887-1888

An item reported that in 1886-1887 the Royal Netherlands Navy tested two in the Netherlands prepared fish torpedoes in the Dutch East Indies to become aware what the effects were of a political climate. It became clear after examining the torpedoes that these were no longer in ready condition. The vertical rudders needed to be trimmed, the torpedoes disassembled, cleaned and trimmed again to get the same launch results as before the torpedoes were shipped. It became clear that it had no use to prepare torpedoes in the Netherlands which were to be used in the Dutch East Indies. Instead cleaning and trimming was to be done in the Dutch East Indies. 

The Haitian navy according to the commanding officer of the Dutch screw steamship 1st class Koningin Emma der Nederlanden in 1887

Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh

Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original source

Dutch Zr. Ms. Koningin Emma der Nederlanden

The Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Atjeh (1) commanded by captain C.H. Bogaert was in 1886 in the Dutch West Indies stationed until she was replaced by the screw steamship 1st class Koningin Emma der Nederland (2) on 14 February 1887. The next day departed the Atjeh towards the Netherlands. On 5 March 1887 anchored the Koningin Emma der Nederlanden in the roads of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Her salute of 21 gunshots was answered with a 17 gunshots salute, the maximum what the Haitian government did. Within short time arrived the adjutant of the Haitian admiral Robbert Cooper (3), who was a son of the American admiral Cooper. The adjutant reported that the admiralship of the Haitian navy, the Dessalines, which flying a vice-admirals flag, was not able to return a salute while she just was armed with 4 guns and the ram ship Toussaint Louverture (4) and the advice yacht in the inner roads had just one gun. The Dessalines never steamed while she had to stay in the reads of Port-au-Prince as escape possibility for the president. Both other two small ships could even not steam and had complete native crews including officers. The 7th arrived the British HMS Canada (5) captain L.A. Beaumont flying a vice-admirals flag coming from Barbados. On the 10th was Port-au-Prince left.

Notes
1. Also called frigate. Call sign GQCN. Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 3 March 1875, launched on 6 December 1876, commissioned on 1 November 1877, converted into a an accommodation ship at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands in 1906. Commissioned while replacing the Het Loo in 1908, also used as floating battery for salutes by replacing the 12cm by 7,5cm guns since 1910, further more used for training sailors of the Royal Naval Reserve at Willemsoord, Netherlands until 21 May 1921, decommissioned and since then used as accommodation ship for the air service at Willemsoord, Netherlands, disarmed until 1922, disarmed and stricken in 1929 and finally sold to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk‘s industrieële onderneming at Hendrik Ido Ambacht, Netherlands for ƒ 23.501,00 to be broken up in May 1935.
2. Also called frigate, call sign GQMF, on stocks as De Ruyter at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 6 November 1876, completed for the half on 31 October 1876, renamed Koningin Emma der Nederlanden on 7 January 1879, launched on 20 January 1879, commissioned on 1 December 1881, decommissioned on 22 May 1896 for repairs, commissioned on 16 June 1897, decommissioned on23 June 1900, converted at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands into an accommodation ship in 1908, commissioned on 16 November 1908, guard ship at Willemsoord, Netherlands in 1920, captured by the German forces at Willemsoord on 14 May 1940, capsized and sunk at Den Helder in 1942, salvaged in April 1943 and scuttled north of Fort Harssens.
3. Rear admiral George H. Cooper (27 July 1821 USA New York-17 November 1891 Brooklyn, New York, USA) of the US Navy, served in the navy between 1836-1884.
4. Launched by the Societé des forges et Chantiers, France in 1886. His son Mason S. Cooper (1847Portsmouth, Virgiania, USA-2 January 1891, Brooklyn, New York, YSA) was admiral in the Haitian navy.
5. Comus-class screw steam corvette, laid down at the Portsmouth Dockyard, England in 1879, launched on 26 August 1881, completed in 1881, reserve since December 1896 and sold in 1897.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1886-1887. 

Swedish galley Vellingk 1725-1758

Built at Vastervik in 1725, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Lidingon 1725-1758

Built at Lidingo in 1725, last mentioned inI 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Cronhielm 1725-1755

Built at Stockholm in 1725, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Tovalite1721-1755

Built at Ladugardslandet in 1721, last mentioned between >1751-1755<. {

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933

Swedish galley Ormen 1721-1755

Built at Vastervik in 1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Chinese guided missile frigate Yangzhou (578) 2013-




Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Added to the East China Fleet on 21 September 2015. Launched by Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. In September 2013 and finished her sea trials in June 2015. Type 054A multi purpose class frigates, called by the NARO Jiangkai II. The first commissioned in 2007 of at least 24. Difference with the 054 Type are improved sensors and weapons. Displacement 4.053 tons (full) and as dimensions 134,1 x 16 metres or 440 x 52 feet. Machinery consists of CODAD 4x7.600hp Shaanxi 16PA6 STC diesels allowing an estimated speed of 27 knots. Estimated range is 8.025 nautical miles. Crew numbers 165 men. Able to carry a Kamov Ka-28 Helix or Harbin Z-9C helicopter with her for which a hangar is available. Armament consists of 1-32-cell vertical launching system HQ-16 SAM , Yu-8 anti submarine rocket launchers, 2x4 C-803 anti-ship/land attack missiles, 1-7,6cm PJ26 dual purpose gun, 2-3cm Type730 7-barrel CIWS guns or Type 1130, 2x3-32,4cm Yu-7 anti submarine warfare (ASW) torpedoes, 2x6 Type 87 24cm anti submarine rocket launcher with 36 rockets and 2 Type 726-4 18-tube decoy launchers. 

Chinese guided missile frigate Huanggang (577) 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Type 054A multi purpose class frigates, called by the NARO Jiangkai II. The first commissioned in 2007 of at least 24. Difference with the 054 Type are improved sensors and weapons. Displacement 4.053 tons (full) and as dimensions 134,1 x 16 metres or 440 x 52 feet. Machinery consists of CODAD 4x7.600hp Shaanxi 16PA6 STC diesels allowing an estimated speed of 27 knots. Estimated range is 8.025 nautical miles. Crew numbers 165 men. Able to carry a Kamov Ka-28 Helix or Harbin Z-9C helicopter with her for which a hangar is available. Armament consists of 1-32-cell vertical launching system HQ-16 SAM , Yu-8 anti submarine rocket launchers, 2x4 C-803 anti-ship/land attack missiles, 1-7,6cm PJ26 dual purpose gun, 2-3cm Type730 7-barrel CIWS guns or Type 1130, 2x3-32,4cm Yu-7 anti submarine warfare (ASW) torpedoes, 2x6 Type 87 24cm anti submarine rocket launcher with 36 rockets and 2 Type 726-4 18-tube decoy launchers. Commissioned in January 2015. Part of the East Sea Fleet. 

Chinese replenishment ship Gaoyouhu (966) 2014-




Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Qiandoahu-class Type903 replenishment class called by the NATO Fuchi consists of the Qiandaohu and the Weishanhu and Type903A namely the Taihu, Chaohu, Dongpinhu, Gaayouhu, Luomahu and Honghu. The Gaoyouhu belonged to the East Sea Fleet. Launched by COMEC (GSSC Offshore&Marine Engineering Company Limited) on 30 December 2014 and commissioned on 25 January 2016. Displacement 23.400 tons and as dimensions 178,5 x 24,8 x 8,7 metres. The machinery consists of 2diesels supplying via 2 shafts 24.000hp allowing a speed of 20 knots. With a speed of 14 knots is the range 10.000 nautical miles. Cargo capacity 10.500 tons fuel oil, 250 tons fresh water, 680 tons cargo and ammunition. Her crew numbers 130 men. The armament consisted of 4 H/PJ76F twin 3,7cm guns. There is a hangar and flight deck available for the Z-8 or Z-9 helicopter. 

Dutch steam towing launch Sabangbaai (XD-506) at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde (Town Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands T533)

Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde (Town Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands T506)

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

In July 1946 was Sabangbaai (1) examined while lying in the water. She was for the last time docked in begin 1943. Coal bunkers, raised quarterdeck, closed bulwark and railing were in worse condition. Saloon panelling and deck benches disappeared just like the cargo winch. The hull, thrushes, bulkheads, wood foredeck, top plates of the double bottom and cargo winch on the foredeck were in reasonable condition. The steam boiler was in quite well condition in contrary to the steam engine with auxiliary engines which were worn out although still usable after thoroughly maintenance. The advice was to condemn her while the expectation was that a large number of hull plates at the outside were in a worse condition.

Source
1. Identical to the steel-built double bottomed screw steam tug Sabangbaai  ordered to be built for a price of ƒ 60.000 with additional labour for ƒ 964,30? The real costs were ƒ 74.114,68 causing a loss of ƒ 13.150,33.
Costs hull ƒ 51.3999,85 (stores ƒ 22.017,26-inventory ƒ 4.087,70-wages ƒ 15.890,94-expenses ƒ 9.403,95).
Costs engine no. 206 (16”x 32”:18”, 128 rpm, 322 ihp, weight 11.876 kilo) ƒ 15.458,44 (stores ƒ 9.615,86-inventory ƒ 527,48-wages ƒ 3.156.35-expenses ƒ 2.158,75).
Costs boiler no. 347 (11’0½”x 9’0”, weight 16.260 tons, pressure 120 lbs) ƒ 7.256,39 (ƒ stores ƒ 3.520,61-inventory ƒ 111,62-wages ƒ 2.203,36-ƒexpenses ƒ 11.410,80). At the trial was with 308 hp, a draught of 9’0” and a displacement of 342 tons a speed of 9,71 knots achieved. The dimensions according to the contract were 100’ (between perpendiculars) x 20; (midship section) x 11’(hold midship section). The draught was to be 9’ with a displacement of 213 tons included coal, water and 150 ton cargo. The engine had to be a vertical two-cylinder compound steam engine. Specifications according to the order card system (Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde) 30,48 (between perpendiculars)-32,21 (over all) x 6,10 x 2,74 x 3,25 (hold) metres or 100’0”-105’8” x 20’0” x 9’0” x 11’0”. At the launching was her displacement 140 tons with a draught of 2’11” (fore)-5’10”(aft). Coal bunker capacity 53 ton. Water ballast capacity 54 ton. Tonnage 200,68 tons, 79,8 met, deadweight 138 ton and displacement 342 ton. Her building as the Generaal van Heutsz at the shipyard of the Kon.Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands by the N.V. Zeehaven Kolenstation Sabang, Amsterdam, Netherlands was ordered on 15 October 1902, laid down by engineer J. Janszen jr. with yard number 104 below the roof at the Noordwal on 6 January 1903, in the thrushes on 31 January, plating fitted on 24 March, launched on 24 March, trial while berthed on 6 April, trial on 11 April and delivered and departure towards the Dutch East Indies on the 13th.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motor tug Maggy (XT-538) at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

For the last time docked in September 1939. In July 1946 examined while in the water. Hull on waterline, wood and steel deck, connection superstructure and deck and bulwark in worse condition. The 120hp engine was useless. The rest of the casco in reasonable condition although it was to be feared that the hull below the waterline was also in worse condition. Except for major repairs was also the foundation to be altered to make it possible to fit her out with a new engine. Due to the large costs was it advice not to repair her and to commission again.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motor craft XH-538 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull reasonable. Engine needed thoroughly repairs. Ship overall needed many repairs. Was a small pleasure craft. If needed elsewhere to be shipped

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch harbour motor vessel XH-539 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull worse. Machinery needed thoroughly repairs. The whole vessel needed repairs. If needed elsewhere to be shipped.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch personnel open landing crafts N-105, 106 and 107at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull extra ordinary worse. Two engines were to be shipped towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch motor vessel XL-1002 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Decommissioned. Hull could not be repaired at Sabang. Condition of the machinery was reasonable. Belonged to the army (K.N.I.L.) for patrol and communication tasks. Authorization was given to break up. For the time being used as accommodation ship at Balchan. Wood-built.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch patrol vessel XA-1011 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of the hull reasonable. Condition of machinery could not yet be examined. Used by the harbour for NEFIS (intelligence) tasks.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch coal lighter XR-551 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Fitted out with a 30 tons sheerleg. Hull in extra ordinary worse condition, underwater ship could not be controlled. Used by the harbourmaster for lifting heavy parts.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch lighter XR-522 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Steel made. Lacking hatches. Condition of hull reasonable. Used by the harbourmaster as lighter.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Hulls of Dutch submarines needed to be more smooth according to an advice in 1922


Copyright Archive Municipalty Archive Vlissingen 413.40/FA11887

On 21 January 1922 send the inspector of the submarine service Gerard Lodewijk Schorer stationed at Den Helder, Netherlands an advice to the naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands dealing with the smoothness of the hulls of submarines and the effects on the range and speed. The Dutch submarines Hr. Ms. K III and K IV were compared with a Spanish submarines which had complete similar lines. It became again obvious how important the smoothness of hull was and to prevent at least as much protruding parts despite the wishes of some commanding officers. Submerged speed and range were of the highest importance seen from defensive and offensive view and just in time in upmost emergency to be neglected.

The submerged achievements were:
Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. K III with as much removed as possible except for the telegraph and compass and one periscope out, front rudders out with 281/271 rpm and 390kW a speed of 8,42 miles.

The Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. K IV with railing on the bridge and minesweeping rigging, front rudders out and one periscope out and with 271 romp and 363 KW a speed of 7,88 miles.

The anonymous Spanish submarine with the same lines as the Dutch K III, all rigging removed, front rudders in, 2 periscopes out, with 390 KW and 198rpm a speed of 9,15 miles, with 363 KW and 193rpm a speed of 8,95 miles and with 300 KW and 1180rpm a speed of 8,42 miles.

The general conclusion was that the Spanish was more efficient, with a speed of 7,86 miles was just 2/3 of the horsepower of the  K IV needed, meaning that with a similar battery the range was factor 1,5 of the Dutch submarine. So it was a necessity to prevent protruding parts.

Achievements while surfaced:
KIII with a displacement of 580 ton, a speed of 16,332 miles with 439rpm and 868+832hp
KIV with a displacement of 578 ton, a speed of 14,24 miles with 401 rpm, 2x600hp
Spanish submarine with a d displacement of 555 ton, a speed of 16,49 miles with 380rpm and 2x700hp.

Notes
1. Built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with yard number 161. Electric Boat Company design. Supervisor H.H. Johnstone of the E.B.C. Ordered on 24 July 1914, contact signed in November 1914, keel laid down in the shed on the Noordwal on 15 July 1915, launched on 12 August 1919, trial on 3 April 1920, delivered on 9 July 1920 and stricken in March 1937. Displacement 582,690 (surfaced)-720,90 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 64,084 x 5.526 x 4.856 metres. An armament of 6-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoes were carried.
2. Built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with yard number 164. Electric Boat Company design. Supervisor H.H. Johnstone of the E.B.C. Ordered in October 1915, keel laid down in the shed on the Noordwal on 30 December 1915, launched on 2 July 1920, trial on 20 January 1921, delivered on 27 April 1921 and stricken in March 1937. Displacement 582,690 (surfaced)-720,90 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 64,084 x 5.526 x 4.856 metres. An armament of 6-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoes were carried.
3. This must be a B-class submarine consisting of the B-1/B-6 built between 1921-1923 by at SECN-Sociedad Espagnola de Construcciones Navales, Cartagena, Spain. Displacement 556 (submerged)-740 (surfaced) tons and as dimensions 64.1 x 5.6 x 5.2 metres. Armament consisted of 4-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes (2xbow, 2x stern), for which 8 torpedoes were carried and 1-7,6cm anti aircraft gun.

Source
Archive Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague 2.12.18) inventory number 293. 

Monday, 18 September 2017

Swedish galley Lustig 1721-1755

Built at Tyresion, Sweden in  1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Hurtig 1721-1755

Built at Tyresion, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Snall 1721-1755

Built at Stockholm, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Bestandig 1721-1755

Built at Stockholm or Lidingo, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1755. {342}.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Vaksam 1721-1758

Built at Stockholm, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Stabi 1721-1758

Built at Norrkoping, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Horn 1720-1761

Built at Stockholm, Sweden in 1720, last mentioned in 1761.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish oil/chemical tanker Fure West 2006-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Faroe Islands-flagged, homeport Nolsoy, IMO 9301873, MMSI 231775000 and call sign OZ2100. Owned and managed by Firetank Rederi, Donso, Sweden. Built by Edward Shipyard, Shanghai, China in 2006. 

British oil/chemical tanker Crystal Diamond 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9327059, MMSI 248078000 and call sign 9HA2165. Owned by Crystal Pool UK, London, United Kingdom and managed by Crystal Pool, Genoa, Italy. Built by Sekwang Heavy Industries Ulsan, Ulsan, South Korea in 2008. 

Greek oil/chemical tanker Nave Polaris 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9457749, MMSI 538004188 and call sign V7VQ6. Built by Dae Sum Shipbuilding&Engineering, Pusan, South Korea in 2011. Owned and managed by Navios Tankers Management, Athens, Greece. 

German research/survey vessel Meridian 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9299977, MMSI 23651000 and call sign ZDJC9. Owned and managed by Fugro Osea, Bremen, Germany. Built by Damen Shipyard Hardinxveld, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 2003. 

Monaco oil chemical tanker Lafayette Bay 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Marshall Uslands-flagged, Majuro, IMO 9717785, MMSI 538005536 and call sign V7EU6. Built by by SPP Shipbuilding Sacehon Shipyard, Sacheon, South Korea in 2015. as the SPP Sacheon S1166. Owned by Lafayette Bay Shipping LLC. Monaco and operated by Scorpio Marine Management (India) Pvt. Ltd. 

Dutch tug Thamesbank 1992-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9060704, MMSI 245906000, ENI 2718315 and call sign PHYE. Gross tonnage 321 tons, displacement 169 tons and as dimensions 30,60 x 9,95 x 4.02 metres. Original 2x1.1679hp Deutz engines, nowadays 2x1.670 hp Caterpillar. Built by Breheret Le Roux&Lotz/Alstom Leroux Naval, Saint Malo, France with yard number 616 in 1991 for Smit Havensleepdiensten BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Since 2002 of Smit Harbour Towage BV, Rotterdam. 

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Vigo, Spain as described by the commanding officer f the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1916


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Vigo, Spain. The coal was loaded in prows via baskets of around 250 kilo coming from hulks and 40 kilo baskets from a storehouse all under supervision of the engine room personnel of the Holland. The loading of the prows went very slowly. The prows came alongside of the ship and with the help of scaffoldings was the coal transported via the loading ports into the coal bunkers. In this manner was in 16 hours around 806 ton coals loaded or about 50 tons a hour.

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

The harbour of La Luz, Gran Canaria according to the commander of the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Noord-Brabant in 1916


Princesa de Asturias

The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Noord-Brabant (1) departed on 13th April 1916 Den Helder, Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies. Via La Luz, Gran Canaria (24-26 April) she went on to St. Vincent arriving there on 1 Monday morning 1 May. Her commanding officer captain lieutenant J.W.F.J. de Wal wrote that the harbour was able to supply the enormous number of ships which visited La Luz with victuals, fuel and other needed stores. The victuals delivered by the Santa Catalina Ships Stores Company were of good quality especially the potatoes, unions and pork meat. When supervised was this firm to be recommended. The inner harbour and roads were very suitable for sailing and rowing exercises. For the ships were 854 ton Wels coal for 97.5 shilling a ton bought, 136 ton feeding water, 2.2290 kilo potatoes, meat (248 kilo pork, 515 kilo beef), 491 kilo bread, 300 kilo unions, 120 pieces cabbage 50 eggs and 50 orange. With the Spanish armoured cruiser Princesa de Asturias (2) were visits exchanged.

Notes
1. Laid down at the Koninklijke Maatschappij De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 31 August 1897, launched on 17 January 1899, commissioned on 1 March 1900, disarmed at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands in 1920 and stricken. It was the intention to fit her out as an accommodation ship for infants of which was taken care by the government (Department of Justice). Lacking enough funds this idea was temporarily stopped in August 1921, definitive in 1922 and she was laid up in conservation. She was transferred back to the navy on 23 December 1923 which fitted her out as a guard ship to serve at Vlissingen to replace the Buffel in October 1926 was she brought to Vlissingen where she was used as guard ship and as training ship for sailors. She was scuttled and set by her own crew in fire on 17 May 1940 when Germany attacked the Netherlands and the wreck was later sold to be broken up.
2. Of the Princesa de Asturias class armoured cruisers consisting of the Princesa de Asturias, Cataluna and Cardenal de Cisneros. Laid down by Arsenal de la Caracca, Spain on 23 September 1889, launched on 17 October 1896, completed on 10 June 1903 and stricken in December 1927.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1915-1916. 

Rudders of Dutch navy river monitors broadened for better handling in 1887


An item reported that as a result of a secret order of the minister for navy dated 6 December 1886 no. 406 the rudder of the river vessels (1) was to be broadened to make to improve the handling. Furthermore was ordered to make a plan for a protection of the same vessels against floating torpedoes. This plan was made in the meantime and now to be tested. Such a n equipment was still tested in the period 1887-1888.

Note
1. Probably the river monitors Isala, Rhenus, Mosa and Merva designed by the Dutch engineer Tideman using a German design for the Rhein and Mosel. The German vessels were indeed notorious for their worse handling. The Dutch vessels were to serve on the Geldersche Ijssel and upper rivers.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1886-1887. 

Royal Netherlands Navy testing trimmed fish torpedoes in the Dutch East Indies in 1886-1887

As a result of an order of the minister for navy dated 26 October 1886 no. 68 were with a merchant steamship two so-called fish torpedoes and a torpedo man 1st class sent to the Dutch East Indies to obtain more information about the quality of a trimmed torpedo after a period being exposed to a tropical climate. Purpose was to investigate if it was possible and desirable to trim the fish torpedoes in the Netherlands and then sent to the Dutch East Indies. In September 1887 were the torpedoes transported back to the Netherlands for further research.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1886-1887. 

Estonia selling Russian build destroyers Lennuk and Wambola to Peru according to the Dutch magazine Onze Vloot dated January 1934

Lennuk

An item reported that Estonia sold her destroyers Lennuk (1) and Vambola (2) for 400.000 US dollars gold to Peru according to the Marine Rundschau. Both ships were former Russian Imperial ships captured from the Bolsheviks by England in 1918 and handed over to Estonia.
Lennuk launched in 1915, standard measurement 1.500 tons, crew numbering 144 men, horsepower 32.700hp, oil bunker capacity 450 ton and speed 32 miles. Armament consisted of 5-10cm guns, 1-7,6cm anti aircraft gun, 2 machineguns, 3x3-45cm torpedo tubes and able to take 80 mines with her.
Vambola, ex-Kapitan Kinsbergen, launched on 1915, measurement 1.300 tons, crew numbering 110 men, horsepower 30.000hp, oil bunker capacity 400 tons and speed 30 miles. Armament consisted of 4-10cm guns, 3 machineguns, 3x3-45cm torpedo tubes and able to take 80 mines wih her.
Both ships were in fact obsolete and not equal to modern destroyers and according to the Estonian cabinet not suitable for the Estonian coastal defence. Renamed Almirante Guise and Almirante Willar was their voyage towards Peru harassed by problems and needed to be repaired in England and in Spain. The Estonian intention was to buy 2 submarines, 3 motor torpedo boats and 12 bombers similar to the Latvian navy. The sale of the destroyers was not enough to finance the new material completely.

Notes
1. Of the Izyaslav-class consisting of the Avtroil, Izyaslav, Prymyslav, Bryachislav and Fedor Stratilat. Laid down by Reval Shipbuildin Company, Reval [nowadays Tallinn] iin November 1913, launched on 13 January 1915, completed in 1917, renamed Lennuk in Estonian service 1917-1933 and Almirante Guise in Peruvian service 1933-1954 (broken up).
2. Wambola, laid down by Putilov, St. Petersburg, Russia in November 1914, launched on 27 August 1915 and completed in December 1917. 

The Siamese navy according to the Dutch magazine Onze Vloot dated May 1933

An item reported that the Siamese navy consisted of a 905-ton destroyer in 1920 bought in England and financed with a national collection named Phra-Ruang.(1) She was armed with 3-10,2cm guns, some smaller guns and 4-53,3cm torpedo tubes, speed 35 miles, 2 old torpedo boats of around 350 ton and 4 old 100 ton torpedo boats and furthermore 2-1.000 tons new armoured gunboats comparable with Dutch flotilla vessels although smaller, armed with 2-15,2cm guns, speed 12-13 miles, smaller gunboats, 2 motor torpedo boats, survey vessels and so on and the royal yacht Maha-Chakri.

Note
1. R-class destroyer. Laid down by John I. Thornycroft&Company, Woolston, England in December 1915, launched on 25 November 1916, completed in February 1917, sold to her builder on 21 June 1920 and resold to Siam in September 1920 and renamed Phra Ruang, stricken in 1957, still used as training hulk and until 2000 still afloat. Now lying ashore encased in concrete as a memorial for the admiral prince Abhkaran Kiartivongse, considered as the father of the Royal Thai Navy. 

Sunday, 17 September 2017

The destruction of five Cochin Chinese warships by French warships at Turon in April 1847 according to the The Chinese repository



J.W. Norie/J.S. Hobbs. 
Three hundred and six illustrations of the maritime flags off all nations. London, 1848. 

Thanks to the fact that nowadays more and more books are digitized we are able to read books that are some times for decades no longer available for the public for several reasons. That's quite a pity while these books contains useful information while the archives are destroyed, incomplete or nor accessible.

The French rear admiral Cecile demanded in 1845 Tisu Tri, king of Cochin-China without success to release the rt. Reverend Dr. Le Fevre and at the same time allowing his inhabitants which became Christians more (religious) tolerance. When Cecile returned the bishop had been released by his letter to the king still unanswered. His successor commodore La Pierre sent 10 March [1847] the corvette Victorieuse to Turon asking fro an answer.  The corvette arrived there 18 March and was joined by La Pierre 23 March with the frigate La Gloire having departed from Macau 15 March. Still nothing was accomplished and La Pierre decided to act more fiercely to force the acceptation by the Prefect of the letter.

p. 311: “Accordingly the vessels present were put through a number of naval manoeuvres, but this display produced no effect upon the minds of the Cochin-chinese. The Commodore therefore determined upon a more active course; and consequently deprived five Cochin-chinese vessels then in the harbour, and which were of European build, of their sails, so that they might not escape. This was not without effect. On the following day, the 31st March, the Prefect made his appearance, and received with politeness the Commodore and his suite. After some hesitation, he reluctantly consented to receive the letter, seeing that there was no other way of recovering the sails of the five men-of-war, and promised an answer in the course of ten or twelve days. This interval passed without any incident of importance. On the morning of the 12th April an inferior mandarin came on board the La Gloire, and announced that a great mandarin had arrived from the capital with an answer, and invited the Commodore to go on shore and receive it. The Commodore replied that he would not do so having sent his letter by the second in command, he considered it but just that the great mandarin should return the courtesy, and come on board himself with the answer ; at the same time he assured the messenger that the mandarin would be received with every respect. This, however, the Cochin-chinese would not consent to, nor would the Commodore accept of their invitation. On the following day, the 13th April, the Commodore had not yet had an interview with the Prefect, when perceiving that preparations for war were being carried on; as they were sending guns and, ammunition on board the five vessels already named, he sent a boat to intercept the guns, &.C., and in one of the boats intercepted, a letter was found contained in a small box, which was brought to the

p. 312: Commodore.” This letter was dealing with an attack planning to drive the French out of the country. “The Commodore caused an authentic copy of this paper to be made, and sent it to the prefect, demanding an explanation. But no satisfactory answer was returned. Things remained in this position each party preparing for war, when on the morning of the 15th, the French were reduced to the following alternatives; either to fly shamefully, permit themselves to be surrounded by the whole force of the enemy, or to begin the attack when they could do so advantageously. They of course chose the last. Consequently a fire was opened on the Cochin-chinese, between the hours of II and 12 A. M. They were well prepared to return the compliment, which they did in a manner that exceeded the expectations of the French- -but as may be anticipated this availed them nothing; for in the brief period of 70 minutes, no less than 800 balls had been discharged from the two French men-of-war. Out of the five Cochin-chinese men-of-war, one was sunk, another blown up, and a third burnt during the engagement; the remaining two having hoisted a flag of truce, the French men-of-war ceased firing. They went on board, took the wounded on board their own vessels, and after humanely dressing their wounds sent them on shore! The two remaining Cochin-chinese frigates were afterwards burnt. According to the accounts given by the wounded men, there were from 1300 to 1500 hands on board the Cochih-chinese frigates, out of which number the few wounded men who had been taken on

p. 313: board the French men-of-war, to be dressed, were all that survived the action. For although the Cochin-chinese attempted to escape on shore, yet they could not effect it; and many of them were killed by the fire from their own Ports in the attempt, as retreat was forbidden. On the part of the French one man only died of his wounds; and another was slightly wounded. So much for the Cochin-chinese knowledge of the art of gunnery. The remainder of the day was spent in viewing the burning of the Cochin-chinese vessels. “

Source
The Chinese Repository ,volume 16 January-December 1847.

The shipyard of Blandy Brothers&Co. at La Luz, Gran Canaria according to the commander of the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. ms. Noord-Brabant in 1916


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Noord-Brabant (1) departed on 13th April 1916 Den Helder, Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies. Via La Luz, Gran Canaria (24-26 April) she went on to St. Vincent arriving there on 1 Monday morning 1 May. Her commanding officer captain lieutenant J.W.F.J. de Wal wrote that the shipyard of Blandy Brothers&Co., La Luz, was specialised in building wooden schooners and smaller steel vessels. She built no engines but major repairs supervised by an engineer were possible. The slipway was cable for ships until 1.500 tons. The steam launch of the Noord-Brabant was there really satisfying repaired after she was crashed on 3 different points. Repair costs were quite high with 20 pound sterling.

Note
1. Laid down at the Koninklijke Maatschappij De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 31 August 1897, launched on 17 January 1899, commissioned on 1 March 1900, disarmed at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands in 1920 and stricken. It was the intention to fit her out as an accommodation ship for infants of which was taken care by the government (Department of Justice). Lacking enough funds this idea was temporarily stopped in August 1921, definitive in 1922 and she was laid up in conservation. She was transferred back to the navy on 23 December 1923 which fitted her out as a guard ship to serve at Vlissingen to replace the Buffel in October 1926 was she brought to Vlissingen where she was used as guard ship and as training ship for sailors. She was scuttled and set by her own crew in fire on 17 May 1940 when Germany attacked the Netherlands and the wreck was later sold to be broken up.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1915-1916. 

German minehunter (M1098) Siegburg 1987-


Den Helder, Netherlands 7-7-2017

Of the Ensdorf-class consisting of the Ensdorf, Auerbach/Overplatz, Hameln, Pegnitz and Siegburg preceded by the Hameln-class. Type 352 drone countermeasures craft control ship. Laid down at the Krögerwerft, Rendsburg, Germany on 13 October 1987, launched on 14 April 1989 and commissioned on 17 July 1990. Displacement 650 ton and as dimensions 54,0 x 9,20 x 2,84 metres or 178.5 x 30.2 x 9.4 feet. Speed 18 knots. Crew numbered 45 men. Able to take 60 mines with them. Original armament 2-4cm Bofors L70 dual purpose guns to be replaced by 2-2,7cm Mauser MLG27 remote-controlled auto cannons and FIM-92 Stinger surface-to-air missiles (MANPADS). 

Dutch ocean going patrol vessel (OPV) Zr. Ms. Holland (P840) 2008-



Den Helder, Netherlands 7-7-2017

Part of the Holland-class ocean going patrol vessels of four ships all built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding, Vlissingen, Netherlands. The casco’s were built at the Damen shipyard at Galatz, Romania and completed at the Damen shipyard at Vlissingen. This class was designed to be used for coast guard duties in the Netherlands and the Caribbean area including search and rescue and calamity tanks. Further more they were to be used for maritime safety purposes as patrolling against piracy. In 2011 was the decision to sell two off the vessels for budget savings; however not executed. Displacement 3.750 tons and as dimensions 107,9 x 16 x 4,55 metres. Crew numbers 50 men. Armament consists 0f 1-7,cm Oto Melara gun, 1-3c, quick firing Oto Melara gun, 2-12,7mm Oto Melara Hitrole machineguns, 2/4-12,7mm Browning M2 machineguns, 2/6-7,72mm FN MAG machineguns, 2 FRISCS’ and 1 NH-90 helicopter. Laid down on 8 December 2008, launched and christened by the Dutch queen Beatrix on Tuesday 2 February 

Dutch LR 1001 A1 supply vessel Pool Express 2008-

Den Helder, Netherlands 7-7-2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Breskers. IMO no. 9378034, MMSI NO. 245112000 and call sign PHMU. Built at the Damen Shipyard Gorinchem at Gorinchem, Netherlands in 2008. Dimensions 66,10 (between perpendiculars)- 71,85 (over all) x 16,00 x 6,10 (maximum) and a depth of 7,50 metres, 760 tons NRT, 2,534 tons GRT and a deadweight of 3,200 tons. Speed 11,1 (average)-14 (maximum) knots. Together with the Base Express in 2008 part of the so-called Southern North (SNS) Pool managed by Peterson SBS of Den Helder supplying 8 oil and gas companies. Owned and managed by Vroon Offshore, Den Helder, Netherlands. 

Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Van Amstel (F831) 1988-

Den Helder, Netherlands 7-7-2017

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 245965000 and call sign PAME. Of the Karel Dooman-class consisting of  the Karel Doorman (became Belgian Leopold), Van Speijk, Van Amstel, Willem van der Zaan (became Belgian Louise-Marie), Tjerk Hiddes (became Chilean Almirante Riveros), Abraham van der Hulst (became Chilean Almirante Blanco Encalada(, Van Nes (became Portuguese Bartolomeu Dias) and Van Galen (became Portuguese D. Francisco de Almeida). Laid down at the Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 3 May 1988, launched on 19 May 1991 and commissioned on 27 May 1993. Displacement 3,300 tons and as dimensions 122,25 x 14,37 x 4,3 metres. Crew numbers 154 men. Machinery consists of 33.800 hp via 2 Rolls Royce (Spey 1A) gas turbines and 9.790 hp delivered by 2 Stork-Werkspoor diesels diesel engines allowing a speed of 29 knots. Armament consists of 8 Harpoon SMM missiles, 1-7,6cm Oto-Melara, gun, 16 NATO Seasparrow VLS, 2-2cm Oerlikon machineguns, 2x2 Mk32 torpedo tubes, 1-SGE-30 Goalkeeper and 1 NH-90 helicopter. 

Dutch guard ship Cornelia 1747

Of the admiralty Noorderkwartier, a so-called uitlegger, mentioned in 1747, an armament of 12 guns, crew numbered 60 men, served in the Hellegat, commanded by L. Roos. 

Dutch guard ship Cressy 1747-1748

Of the admiralty Zealand, a so-called uitlegger, British collier?,  hired in 1747-1748. 

Dutch guard ship Cretia 1748

Of the admiralty Zealand, a so-called uitlegger, mentioned in 1748, the armament consisted of 5-6pd guns, 2-3pd guns and a crew numbering 24 men. 

Dutch 5th charter Cornelia 1672-1690

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1672, lost at sea or captured by the French on 30 March 1690, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 131½ (prow)-132 x 34 x 14, with an armament of 44-46 guns. 

Dutch transport Cornelis Christiaan 1689

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, victualler, mentioned in 1689, measured 65½ last. 

Dutch transport Croon 1688

Of the admiralty Maze, hired at Rotterdam, Netherlands to bring king-stadholder William III to England in October 1688, dimensions 102 x 24½ x 11¼, height overloop 5 feet, hire ƒ 1.100, master Pieter Aalbertsz, appraised value of ship ƒ 6.800. 

Dutch transport ship Dadelboom 1688

Of the admiralty Maze, hired at Rotterdam, Netherlands to bring king-stadholder William III to England in October 1688, dimensions 75 x 20 x 12 feet, hire ƒ 525, master Maeten Barentse Boom, appraised value of ship ƒ 5.750. 

Saturday, 16 September 2017

Dutch naval survey vessel Luymes (A803) 2004-


Den Helder, Netherlands 7-7-2012

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9271860, MMSI 245939000 and call sign PAUF. Commissioned on 3 June 2004. Displacement 1.875 tons and as dimensions 75,00 x 13,10 x 4,00 metres. Optional armament 2-12,7mm machineguns. Crew numbers 18 men. Two diesels with total horsepower of 1.564 hp allowing a speed of 12 knots. 

Swedish East Indiaman replica Götheborg 1995-

Het IJ, Amsterdam, Netherlands 19 August 2010




Den Helder, Netherlands 7 July 2012

Sweden-flagged, IMO 8646678, MMSI 266198000 and call sign SLOA. Original sank off Gothenburg, Sweden on 12 September 1745 and her wrecked was discovered in 1984. Laid down at the Terra Nova shipyard, Gothenburg, Sweden on 11 June 1895, launched on 6 June 1903, baptized by queen Silvia on 3 September 2004, commissioned on 6 August 2005 with her maiden voyage starting on 18 April 2005. Deadweight 166 tons, gross tonnage 788 tons and as dimensions 40,55 (between perpendiculars)-40,9 (over all)-58 (including bowsprit) x 11 x 4,95 (draught) x 6,75 (hold) metres or 133.0-134.2-190.3 x 36.1 x 16.3 x 22.2 feet. 3-Decked. Full rigged with a sail area of 1.964 square metres/21.140 square feet and as auxiliary machinery 2-550hp Volvo Penta 103 diesels. Crew numbers 80 men including 60 volunteers. Armament consist of 10 long guns.