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Sunday, 26 February 2017

Dutch East Indies steamship Graaf van Bijlandt cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 18 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 17th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies steamship Graaf van Bijlandt captain Cramer, coming from Atjeh, Padang via coastal towns, shipping agents N.I. St. Mij.(1)

Note
1. Call sign TDMF, horsepower 200hp, homeport Batavia and net capacity 2.246,76 cubic metres/793,90 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

British steamship Provincia arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 18th reported the arrival of the British steamship Provincia master Mckenzie returning from sea, shipping agents Erdmann&Sielcken. 

British steamship Camorta arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from China and Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 18 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 18th reported the arrival of the British steamship Camorta captain Tyfe coming from China and Singapore, shiping agents Java Agency. 

Dutch government steamship Adrienne cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 18th reported the arrival of the Dutch government steamship Adrienne coming from Telok-Betong, Dutch East In dies. 

American heavy cruiser USS Baltimore (CA-68) 1941-1972


USS Wichita

Cleveland-class

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Fore Shipyard, Quincy Massachusetts, USA on 26 May 1941, launched by Mrs. Howard W. Jackson on 28 July 1942, commissioned on 15 April 1943, decommissioned on 8 July 1946, recommissioned 28 November 1951, decommissioned on 31 May 1956, stricken on 15 February 1971, sold to be broken up to the Zidell Ship Dismantling Company, Portland, Oregon, USA on 10 April 1972, executed in September 1972. Call sign NAKY.

Part of the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, Columbus, Helena, Bremerton, Fall River, Macon, Toledo, Los Angles and Chicago, preceded by the USS Wichita and succeeded by the Oregon City-class. The Baltimore-class was in fact a mix between the heavy cruiser USS Wichita and the Cleveland-class light cruisers.

General technical class specifications.
Approximately building costs of each ship was 40 million US dollars. Totally were 14 ships built. With a displacement of 14.733 (standard)-17.273 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,18 (height mast) metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’10”x 112’10”. The machinery consisted of geared steam turbines and 4 boilers allowing with the 4 screws and a horsepower of around 120.000 hp a speed of 33 knots. There were two engine rooms. With the fuel oil bunker capacity of 2.250 tons and a cruising speed of 15 knots was a range of around 10.000 nautical miles possible. The crew numbered 1.146 men (included 61 officers). The armour consisted of a 10,2cm/4”-15,cm/6” and 1,6cm/0.625” STS plating, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck, 15,2cm/6” thick bulkheads with the turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5”-20,3cm/8”, 17,8cm/7” and 15,2cm/6”. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” 55cal Mark 15 guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” 39 cal Mark 12 guns, 12x4-4cm Bofors guns and 24x1-2cm Oerlikon cannons. Fitted out with 2 catapults for launching the planes, the first 4 ships had 2 cranes, the others just 1 crane on board. 

American heavy cruiser/guided missile cruiser USS Boston (CA-69 1941-1952, CAG-1 1952-1968, CA-69 1968-1975) 1941-1975


USS Wichita

Cleveland-class

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Fore Shipyard, Quincy Massachusetts, USA on 30 June 1941, launched by Mrs. Helen Noonan on 26 August 1942, commissioned on 30 June 1943, decommissioned on 29 October 1946, reclassified CAG-1 on 4 January 1952, converted into a guided missile cruiser by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey between February 1952-1955, recommissioned on 1 November 1955, reclassified CA-69 on 1 May 1968, decommissioned on 5 May 1970, stricken on 4 January 1974 and sold to be broken up on 28 March 1975. Call sign NAWP.

Part of the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, Columbus, Helena, Bremerton, Fall River, Macon, Toledo, Los Angles and Chicago, preceded by the USS Wichita and succeeded by the Oregon City-class. The Baltimore-class was in fact a mix between the heavy cruiser USS Wichita and the Cleveland-class light cruisers.

General technical class specifications.
Approximately building costs of each ship was 40 million US dollars. Totally were 14 ships built. With a displacement of 14.733 (standard)-17.273 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,18 (height mast) metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’10”x 112’10”. The machinery consisted of geared steam turbines and 4 boilers allowing with the 4 screws and a horsepower of around 120.000 hp a speed of 33 knots. There were two engine rooms. With the fuel oil bunker capacity of 2.250 tons and a cruising speed of 15 knots was a range of around 10.000 nautical miles possible. The crew numbered 1.146 men (included 61 officers). The armour consisted of a 10,2cm/4”-15,cm/6” and 1,6cm/0.625” STS plating, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck, 15,2cm/6” thick bulkheads with the turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5”-20,3cm/8”, 17,8cm/7” and 15,2cm/6”. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” 55cal Mark 15 guns, 12x4-4cm Bofors guns and 24x1-2cm Oerlikon cannons. Fitted out with 2 catapults for launching the planes, the first 4 ships had 2 cranes, the others just 1 crane on board. After 1955 2x3-20cm/8” 55 cal guns, 5x2-12,7cm/5” 38 cal anti aircraft guns, 6x2-7,6cm/3” 50 cal anti aircraft guns and 2x2-rail Terrier SAM launchers for which 144 missiles were carried. The 4 floatplanes and 2 stern catapults were then removed. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Minister Fransen van de Putte cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 18th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies steamship Minister Fransen van de Putte coming from Surabaya and Samarang, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents N.I. St. Mij.

Note
1. Call sign TGMQ, homeport Batabia, horsepower 125hp and netto capacity 1.531,12 cubic metres/541,03 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies schooner master Raidon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 18 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies schooner master Raidon coming from Toeban, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch government steamship Lucifer cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Dutch government steamship Lucifer master Hakker coming from Eilanden, Dutch East Indies. 

British steamship Giang Ann arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the British steamship Giang Ann master Courtney coming from Singapore, shipping agents Heijnnenman&Co. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Baron van Tuyll cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies steamship Baron van Tuyll master Mondt coming from Billiton, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents N.I. Handelsbank.(1)

Note
1. Call sign TBSG, homeport Batavia and net capacity 601,96 cubic metres/212,70 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

American heavy cruiser USS Macon (CA-132) 1943-1973

USS Wichita

Cleveland-class

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 14 June 1943, launched by Mrs. Cahrles F. Bowden on15 October 1944, commissioned on 26 August 1945, decommissioned on 12 April 1950, recommissioned on 16 October 1960, decommissioned on 10 March 1961, stricken on 1 November 1969, sold for 375.269,00 US dollars to the Union Minerals and Alloys Corporation, New York City on 5 July 1973 and which was executed at Port Newark, New Jersey, USA. 

Part of the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, Columbus, Helena, Bremerton, Fall River, Macon, Toledo, Los Angles and Chicago, preceded by the USS Wichita and succeeded by the Oregon City-class. The Baltimore-class was in fact a mix between the heavy cruiser USS Wichita and the Cleveland-class light cruisers.

General technical class specifications.
Approximately building costs of each ship was 40 million US dollars. Totally were 14 ships built. With a displacement of 14.733 (standard)-17.273 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,18 (height mast) metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’10”x 112’10”. The machinery consisted of geared steam turbines and 4 boilers allowing with the 4 screws and a horsepower of around 120.000 hp a speed of 33 knots. There were two engine rooms. With the fuel oil bunker capacity of 2.250 tons and a cruising speed of 15 knots was a range of around 10.000 nautical miles possible. The crew numbered 1.146 men (included 61 officers). The armour consisted of a 10,2cm/4”-15,cm/6” and 1,6cm/0.625” STS plating, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck, 15,2cm/6” thick bulkheads with the turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5”-20,3cm/8”, 17,8cm/7” and 15,2cm/6”. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” 55cal Mark 15 guns, 46-4cm Bofors guns and 28x1-2cm Oerlikon cannons. Fitted out with 2 catapults for launching the planes, the first 4 ships had 2 cranes, the others just 1 crane on board. 

American heavy cruiser USS Los Angeles (CA-135) 1943-1975

USS Wichita

Cleveland-class

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by Philadelphia Navy Shipyard on 28 July 1943, launched by Mrs. Fletcher Brown on 20 August 1944, commissioned on 22 July 1945, decommissioned on 9 April 1948, recommissioned on 27 January 1951, decommissioned on 15 November 1963, stricken on 1 January 1974, sold to the National Metal&Steel Corporarion, Terminal Island for 1.036.089 US dollars  and broken up at San Pedro, California on 16 May 1975.

Part of the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, Columbus, Helena, Bremerton, Fall River, Macon, Toledo, Los Angles and Chicago, preceded by the USS Wichita and succeeded by the Oregon City-class. The Baltimore-class was in fact a mix between the heavy cruiser USS Wichita and the Cleveland-class light cruisers.

General technical class specifications.
Approximately building costs of each ship was 40 million US dollars. Totally were 14 ships built. With a displacement of 14.733 (standard)-17.273 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,18 (height mast) metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’10”x 112’10”. The machinery consisted of geared steam turbines and 4 boilers allowing with the 4 screws and a horsepower of around 120.000 hp a speed of 33 knots. There were two engine rooms. With the fuel oil bunker capacity of 2.250 tons and a cruising speed of 15 knots was a range of around 10.000 nautical miles possible. The crew numbered 1.146 men (included 61 officers). The armour consisted of a 10,2cm/4”-15,cm/6” and 1,6cm/0.625” STS plating, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck, 15,2cm/6” thick bulkheads with the turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5”-20,3cm/8”, 17,8cm/7” and 15,2cm/6”. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” 55cal Mark 15 guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” 39 cal Mark 12 guns, 12x4-4cm Bofors guns and 28x1-2cm Oerlikon cannons. Fitted out with 2 catapults for launching the planes, the first 4 ships had 2 cranes, the others just 1 crane on board. 

American heavy cruiser USS Toledo (CA-133) 1943-1974

USS Wichita

Cleveland-class

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 13 September 1943, launched by Mrs. Edward J. Moan on 6 May 1945, commissioned on 27 October 1946, decommissioned on 21 May 1960, stricken on 1 January 1974, sold for 983.461, 29 US dollars to the National Metal&Scrap Corporation to be broken up on 30 October 1974.

Part of the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, Columbus, Helena, Bremerton, Fall River, Macon, Toledo, Los Angles and Chicago, preceded by the USS Wichita and succeeded by the Oregon City-class. The Baltimore-class was in fact a mix between the heavy cruiser USS Wichita and the Cleveland-class light cruisers.

General technical class specifications.
Approximately building costs of each ship was 40 million US dollars. Totally were 14 ships built. With a displacement of 14.733 (standard)-17.273 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,18 (height mast) metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’10”x 112’10”. The machinery consisted of geared steam turbines and 4 boilers allowing with the 4 screws and a horsepower of around 120.000 hp a speed of 33 knots. There were two engine rooms. With the fuel oil bunker capacity of 2.250 tons and a cruising speed of 15 knots was a range of around 10.000 nautical miles possible. The crew numbered 1.146 men (included 61 officers). The armour consisted of a 10,2cm/4”-15,cm/6” and 1,6cm/0.625” STS plating, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck, 15,2cm/6” thick bulkheads with the turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5”-20,3cm/8”, 17,8cm/7” and 15,2cm/6”. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” 55cal Mark 15 guns, 12x4-4cm Bofors guns and 28x1-2cm Oerlikon cannons. Fitted out with 2 catapults for launching the planes, the first 4 ships had 2 cranes, the others just 1 crane on board. 

American heavy cruiser USS Helena (CA-75) 1943-1975

USS Wichita

Cleveland-class

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Fore Shipyard, Quincy Massachusetts, USA on 9 September 1943, launched by Mrs. John T. Haytin on 28 April 1945, commissioned on 4 September 1945, decommissioned on 29 June 1963, stricken on 1 January 1974, sold to the Leven Metals Company, Dan Jose, California, USA to be broken up on 13 November 1974 which was done at Richmond, California, USA in 1975.

Part of the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Baltimore, Boston, Canberra, Quincy, Pittsburgh, Saint Paul, Columbus, Helena, Bremerton, Fall River, Macon, Toledo, Los Angles and Chicago, preceded by the USS Wichita and succeeded by the Oregon City-class. The Baltimore-class was in fact a mix between the heavy cruiser USS Wichita and the Cleveland-class light cruisers.

General technical class specifications.
Approximately building costs of each ship was 40 million US dollars. Totally were 14 ships built. With a displacement of 14.733 (standard)-17.273 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,18 (height mast) metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’10”x 112’10”. The machinery consisted of geared steam turbines and 4 boilers allowing with the 4 screws and a horsepower of around 120.000 hp a speed of 33 knots. There were two engine rooms. With the fuel oil bunker capacity of 2.250 tons and a cruising speed of 15 knots was a range of around 10.000 nautical miles possible. The crew numbered 1.146 men (included 61 officers). The armour consisted of a 10,2cm/4”-15,cm/6” and 1,6cm/0.625” STS plating, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck, 15,2cm/6” thick bulkheads with the turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5”-20,3cm/8”, 17,8cm/7” and 15,2cm/6”. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” 55cal Mark 15 guns, 12x4-4cm Bofors guns and 22x1-2cm Oerlikon cannons. Fitted out with 2 catapults for launching the planes, the first 4 ships had 2 cranes, the others just 1 crane on board. 

Saturday, 25 February 2017

American heavy cruiser USS Wichita (CA-45) 1935-1959

New Orleans-class

USS Wichita

Baltimore-class

Built under the London Naval Treaty restrictions was she originally planned to be part of the New Orleans-class. Instead of this was a hull used of a modified Brooklyn-class light cruisers design. The Wichita-design was used for developing the American heavy cruiser designs like the Baltimore-class.

Building approved under the 1929 Cruiser Act, laid down at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 28 October 1935, launched on 16 November 1937, commissioned on 16 February 1939m decommissioned on 3 February 1947, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to the Union Minerals and Alloys Corporation to be broken up on 14 August 1959.

With a displacement of 10.759 (standard)-13.224 (full load) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 x 18,82 (over all) x 7,24 metres or 600-608’4” x 61’9’x 23’9”. The machinery consisted of 4 Parsons steam turbines and 8 Babcock&Wilcox oil fuelled water tube boilers supplying 100.000 shp and allowing via the 4 screws a speed of 33 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 10.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 929 men. For the 4 scout planes she could carry were 2 catapults available. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,32cm/8” /55 Mark 12 guns, 8x1-12,7cm/5” /38 Mark 12 dual purpose guns guns, 4x4&8x2-4cm Bofors guns and 18x1-2cm Oerlikon cannon. The armour consisted of a 16cm/6.4” thick belt, a 5,7cm/2.25” thick deck with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 20cm/8” and 15cm/6”. 

Preliminary design for an American gunboat dated November 1915


Designed as part of the Fiscal Year 1917 program and based on earlier approved technical demands and wishes and the realization of the USS Asheville (1) to be constructed under the Fiscal Year 1916 program. The USS Tulsa (2) built under the Fiscal Year 1918 was built using a modified version of this design.

Dimensions 225 (waterline)-40’9” (waterline) x 11’3” and a normal displacement of 15.75 tons. Displacement of 1.575 tons: complete hull 797 tons, protection 8 tons, steam engineering 219 tons, reserve feed 2/3 supply 8 tons, battery 25 tons, ammunition and 2/3 ordnance stores 47 tons, equipment and 2/3 equipment stores 82 tons, outfit and 2/3 stores 120 tons and coal 2/3 full supply 269 tons.

The sustained speed was to be with 450ehp 12 knots and with a cruising speed of 10 knots was the range estimated to be 8.000 nautical miles. There was one boiler room planned. The armament was to consist of 3x1-10,16cm/4” quick firing guns (forward 1, aft 2).

Source
Naval History and Heritage Command. Spring Styles Book 1911-1925 design S584-092.

Notes
1. Of the Asheville-class, ordered on 29 August 1916, laid down by Charleston Naval Shipyard, North Charleston, South Carolina, USA on 9 June 1917, launched on 4 July 1918 and finally sunk underway from the Dutch East Indies towards Australia by a Japanese warship on 3 March 1942. Displacement 1.600 (standard)-1.790 (full load) and as dimensions 73,51 x 12,55 x 3,45 metres or 241’2”x 41’2”x 11’4”.
2. Of the Asheville-class, laid down by Charleston Naval Shipyard, North Charleston, South Carolina, USA on 9 December 1919, launched on 25 August 1922 and broken up in 1948. Displacement 1.226 (standard)-1.790 (full load) tons and as dimensions 73,51 x 12,57 x 3,89 metres or 241’2”x 41’3”x 12’9”. 

Preliminary design American destroyer leader dated 11 June 1918

The design was made for a destroyer leader with a displacement of 1.750 tons. It was a traditional design lacking inner bottom or wing tanks. The design was however never realized.

Source
Naval History and Heritage Command. Spring Styles Book 1911-1925 design S584-142. 

Preliminary design American destroyer leader dated 11 June 1918


The design was made for a destroyer leader with a length of 335 feet and a displacement of 1.750 tons. It was an enlarged version of the 1.525 tons design with a length of 325 feet. To obtain a maximum speed of 35 knots was a larger engine needed which resulted in an increased length and displacement. The design was however never realized.

Source
Naval History and Heritage Command. Spring Styles Book 1911-1925 design S584-143. 

Preliminary design American destroyer leader dated 10 June 1918


The design was made of a 2.150-2.200 ton measuring destroyer leader with a length of 360 feet and which would have a maximum speed of 37 knots. The boiler rooms were separated arranged each beneath one funnel to create a better use of the available topside deck area. Between the two boiler rooms were the two engine rooms situated. Despite the fact that the designers were unsatisfied with the structural stresses they expected to appear in the hull amidships was the design approved by the US Navy’s Bureau of Steam Engineering on 14 June 1918 fur further development. The design was however never realized.

Source
Naval History and Heritage Command. Spring Styles Book 1911-1925 design S584-141. 

Preliminary design American destroyer leader dated 10 June 1918


The design was made of a 2.150-2.200 ton measuring destroyer leader with a length of 360 feet and which would have a maximum speed of 37 knots. The boilers were all arranged in 2 boiler rooms situated behind each other directly beneath both the two funnels. The design was however never realized.

Source
Naval History and Heritage Command. Spring Styles Book 1911-1925 design S584-140. 

American light cruiser USS Oklahoma City (CL 91) 1942-1957 and guided missile cruiser (CLG-5 1957-1975 and CG-5 1975-1999) 1957-1999


Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by William Cramp&Sons Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA on 8 December 1942, launched by Mrs. Anton H. Classen on 20 February 1944, commissioned on 22 December 1944, decommissioned on 30 June 1947, converted into a Galveston-class guided missile cruiser between 1957-1960, reclassified as CLG-5 on 23 May 1957, recommissioned on 7 September 1960, reclassified as CG-5 on 1 July 1975, decommissioned on 15 December 1979 and sunk after she was torpedoed by the South Korean submarine Lee Chun (SS-062) while used as a target for air-launched missiles south west of Guam on 25 March 1999. Call sign NBWR.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 100.000 shp allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 (including 70 officers)-1.426 men (as guided missile cruiser). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns,6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 11x1-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. As guided missile cruiser 1x3-15cm/6” 47cal Mark 16 guns, 1x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns and 1x2-rail Mark 7 Talos SAM for which 46 missiles were available. 

Swedish bark Anna cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 19 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Swedish bark Anna master Eiddenberg coming from Macassar, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents J.F. van Leeuwen&Co. 

British ship County of Roxburgh arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from England according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 22 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 21st reported the arrival of the British ship County of Roxburgh coming from Penarth, United Kingdom, shipping agents N.I. St. Mij. 

Dutch screw steamship Sumatra arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 22 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 21st h reported the arrival of the Dutch steamship Sumatra captain Drooglever Fortuijn coming from Amsterdam, Netherlands, Genoa, Italy and Padang, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents J. Daendels&Co.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship, homeport Amsterdam, call sign PTFM, horsepower 400hp and net capacity 5.493,91 cubic metres/1.939,36 tons of s,83 cubic metres. 

American light cruiser USS (ex-Wiles Barre 1941-1942) Astoria (CL-90) 1942-1971

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by William Cramp&Sons Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA on 6 September 1941, renamed Astoria after 9 August 1942, launched by Mrs. Robert Lucas on 6 March 1943, commissioned on 17 May 1944, decommissioned on 1 July 1949, stricken on 1 November 1969 and sold to the Nicholai Joffe Corporation, Beverly Hills, California, USA to be broken up on 12 January 1971. Call sign NBXG.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 100.000 shp allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns,6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 10x1-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. 

French sailing mortar vessel la Trombe (1854) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 12 December 1843 and launched on 5 May 1855. Wood-built. Armed with 2 mortars.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing mortar vessel la Torche (1854) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 12 December 1854 and launched on 1 May 1855. Wood-built. Armed with 2 mortars.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing mortar vessel le Tocsin (1854) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 22 November 1854 and launched on 3 April 1855. Wood-built. Armed with 2 mortars.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing mortar vessel la Fournaise (1854) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 12 December 1854 and launched on 24 April 1855. Wood-built. Armed with 2 mortars.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859

Friday, 24 February 2017

Estonian ro-ro/passenger ship Saaremaa 2010-

Cuxhaven, Germany 25 April 2016

Estonia-flagged, homeport Roomassaare, IMO 9474072, MMSI 276788000 and call sign ESJQ. Built by Fiskerstrand Verft, Fiskarstrand, Norway in 2010. Owned and managed by Saarema Shipping, Kuressaare, Estonia. 

Dutch trailing suction hopper dredger Barent Zanen 1985-



Cuxhaven, Germany 25 April 2016

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, Cyprus, IMO 8315504, MMSI 212487000 and call sign 5BFJ2. Built by IHC Dredgers, Kinderdijk, Netherlands in 1985. Owned and managed by Royal Boskalis Westminster, Papendrecht, Netherlands. 

British cement carrier Ronez 1982-

Cuxhaven, Germany 25 April 2016

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Exeter, IMO 8102476, MMSI 232003642 and call sign GCJP. Built by Scheepswerf van Goor, Monnikendam, Netherlands in 1982. Owned by Aggregate Industries, Markfield and managed by World Self Unloades, Frome, both United Kingdom. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Cheribon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 22 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 22nd  reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies steamship Cheribon captain Krijger coming from Palembang and Muntok, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents N.I. St. Mij.(1)

Note
1. Homeport Batavia, call sign TCLB and net capacity 1.184,62 cubic metres/418,59 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch government hopper barge Cheribon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 24 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 22nd reported the arrival of the Dutch government hopper barge Cheribon coming from the east. 

Dutch East Indies schooner Tjin Ek cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 24 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 22nd reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies schooner Tjin Ek Hong master Darman coming from Telok-Betong.(1)

Note
1. Homeport Batavia, call sign TJFL and net capacity 192,47 cubic metres/68,01 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

American light cruiser USS Miami (CL-89) 1941-1962

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by William Cramp&Sons Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA on 2 August 1941, launched by Mrs. C.H. Reefer on 8 December 1942, commissioned on 28 December 1943, decommissioned on 30 June 1947, stricken on 1 September 1961 and sold to the Nicholai Joffe Corporation, Beverly Hills, California, USA to be broken up on 20 July 1962. Call sign NBYU.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 100.000 shp allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns,6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 10x1-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. 

Dutch bark Anna Aleida arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 24 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 24th reported the arrival of the Dutch bark Anna Aleida captain Bleeker coming from New York, USA, shipping agents Van den Berg&Co.(1)

Note
1. Built by J.K. Smith, Krimpen a/d Lek, Netherlands in 1886, owner P. van der Hoog, 1.102 tons and as dimensions 205 x 35.1 x 20.9 feet and captain R. Bleeker. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Mijer cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 24 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 24th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Mijer captain Berghuis van Woortman coming from Surabaya and Samarang via several coastal villages, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents N.I. St. Mij.(1)

Note
1. Homeport Batavia, call sign TDLW, horsepower 135hp and net capacity 1.2590,84 cubic metres/441,71 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch steamship Celebes arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 27 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 26th reported the arrival of the Dutch steamship Celebes captain Wilkens coming from via Amsterdam, Netherlands, Genoa, Italy and Padang, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents Java Agency Company Limited.(1)

Note
1. Homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands, call sign NJSK and net capacity 4.268.34 cubic metres/1/506,72 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

American light cruiser USS Duluth (CL-87) 1942-1960

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dr Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 9 November 1942, launched by Mrs. E.H. Hatch on 13 January 1944, commissioned on 18 September 1844, decommissioned on 25 June 1949 and sold to be broken up on 14 November 1960. Call sign NUBP.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 100.000 shp allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns,6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 10x1-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. 

French sailing mortar vessel La Bombe (1854) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 22 November 1854 an launched on 18 April 1855. Wood-built. Armed with 2 mortars.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French screw steam floating battery la Tonnante (1854) in 1859

Homeport Toulon, France. Laid down at Brest, France on 5 September 1854 and launched on 17 March 1855. Machinery manufactured at Le Creuzot, France and delivering 225hp. Wood built. Armed with 18 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French screw steam floating battery la Lave (1854) in 1859

Homeport Toulon, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 20 August 1854 and launched on 26 May 1855. Machinery manufactured at Le Creuzot, France and delivering 225hp. Wood built. Armed with 18 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

American light cruiser USS Vicksburg (CL-86) 1942-1964

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 26 October 1942, launched by Miss Muriel Hamilton  on 14 December 1943, commissioned on 12 June 1944, decommissioned on 30 June 1947, laid up, stricken on 1 October 1962 and sold to the National Metal and |Steel Corporation, Terminal Island, California, USA to be broken up on 25 August 1964. Call sign NUDW.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 100.000 shp allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns,6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 10x1-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. 

Thursday, 23 February 2017

British car carrier (ex-Tor Hafnia 2008-2011) Hafnia Seaways 2011-

Cuxhaven, Germany, 25 April 2016

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9357602, MMSI 235060989 and call sign 2AMH9. Ex-Tor Hafnia renamed March 2011. Owned by Snowdon Leasing, London, United Kingdom and managed by Ellingsen Shipmanagement, Stockholm, Sweden. Built by Jinling Shipyard, Nanjong, China in 2008. 

British general cargo ship (ex-Hunzedijk 2001-2005, Flinternhunzen 2005-2013) Vanguard 2013-

Cuxhaven, Germany, 25 April 2016

Isle of Man-flagged, homeport Douglas, Isle of Man, IMO 9224116, MMSI 235102352 and call sign 2HBU7. Ex-Hunzedijk renamed November 2005 and Flinterhunze renamed November 2013. Built by Tille Scheepsbouw, Kootstertille, Netherlands in 2001. Owned and managed by Faversham Ships, Cowes, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom. 

German general cargo ship Hanoi 2011-

Cuxhaven, Germany, 25 April 2016

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9463865, MMSI 236584000 and call sign ZDKA7. Owned and managed by Briese Schiffahrt, Leer, Germany. Built by Thanh Long Shipbuilding, Haiphong, Vietnam in 2011. 

French sailing gun brig la Vigie (1838) in 1859

Homeport Lorient, France, wood-built, laid down at Rochefort, France on 24 December 1838, launched on 30 March 1839 and modernized at Brest in 1845. With an armament of 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing gun brig la Tactique (1838) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, wood-built, laid down at Rochefort, France on 20 December 1838, launched on 29 March 1839 and modernized at Brest, France in 1845. With an armament of 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing gun brig la Panthere (1842) in 1859

Homeport Brest France, wood-built, laid down at Lorient, France on 30 May 1842, launched on and modernized in. With an armament of 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing gun brig (la Malouine (1828) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, wood-built, laid down at Lorient, France on 18 February 1823, launched on 22 April 183 and modernized at Brest in 1845. With an armament of 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing gun brig l’Eglantine (1839) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, wood-built, laid down at Lorient, France on 2 January 1839, launched on 13 June 1839 and modernized at Brest in 1846. With an armament of 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing gun brig l’Alouette (1839) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, wood-built, laid down at Cherbourg, France on 2 January 1939, France, launched on 14 May 1939 and modernized at Brest, France in 1845. With an armament of 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

American light cruiser USS Manchester (CL-83) 1944-1960

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 25 September 1944, launched by Mrs. Ernest J. Gladu on 5 March 1946, commissioned on 29 October 1946, decommissioned on 27 June 1956, stricken on 1 April 1960 and sold to the Nicolai Jaffe Corporation be broken up on 31 October 1960. Call sign NUJZ.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 100.000 shp allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns,6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 10x1-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns.