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Sunday, 18 February 2018

American heavy cruisers to be tested thoroughly during manoeuvres according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 4

Pensacola-class

Northampton-class

New Orleans-class

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 11 May 1935 reporting that during the large manoeuvres between 3 May and 10 June the modified 10.000 tons cruisers were to be tested thoroughly. The first range of 8 ships already needed intensive modifications. Recently was the aft ship strengthened to decrease the vibrations. Furthermore was the heavy armament of 9/10-20,3cm/8” guns blamed for the heavy lurching. The placed ballast seemed not to have solved the problem. Of the modifications used for the seven newest A-cruisers laid down since 1930 were high expectations.(1)

Note
1. The Pensacola-class consisting of the Pensacola and Salt Lake City with a displacement of 9.100 (standard)-11.413 (full load) long tons and an armament of 10-20,3cm/8” guns laid down between 1926-1927, preceded by the St. Louis-class light cruisers built between 1902-1906 and succeeded by the Northampton-class heavy cruisers with a displacement of 9.200 tons and an armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” guns, consisting of the Northampton, Chester, Louisville, Chicago, Houston and Augusta and all laid down in 1928, succeeded by the Portland-class consisting of the Portland and Indianapolis, both laid down in 1930with a displacement of 9.960-10.100 tons and an armament of 3x3-10,2cm/8” guns and succeeded by the New Orleans-class consisting of the New Orleans, Astoria, Minneapolis, Tuscaloosa, San Francisco, Quincy and Vincennes with a displacement of 10.110-12.663 (loaded) tons and an armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” guns. 

Japan started with building fourth Mogami-class cruiser according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

The Mogami. Dutch magazine Onze Vloot dated June 1936, p. 79, drawing by E.Th. Poppe

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 15 October 1934 reporting that in Japan was started with the building of the fourth unit of the 8.500 ton Mogami-class cruisers.(1)

Note
1. This must be the Humano of the Mogami-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Mogami, Mikuma, Suzuya and Kumano. Laid down by Kawasaki Shipyards, Kobe, Japan on 4 August 1934, launched on 15 October 1936, completed on 31 October 1937 and sunk during an American air attack at Santa Cruz, Luzon, Philippines on 25 November 1944. Displacement was actually 13.660 tons (full load). 

USA planning aircraft bases on Guam, Wake and Midway according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the newspaper Washington Herald dated 6 September 1934 reporting that the US navy planned to strengthen Guam, Wake and Midway and founding their aircraft bases which could be used as so-called stepping stones in the Pacific. It this manner became it possible to cross the Pacific starting at Hawaii in steps of 1.200 miles. If the temporarily naval conference at London, England failed was the expectation that a definitive proposal would be sent to the Congress. 

Liberian bulk carrier Fiora Topic 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9728461, MMSI 538006287 and call sign V7LK8. Built on 8 July 2015 2015 as the Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia Namura 401 by Namura Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Imari, Japan. Operated by Marfin Management S.A.M., Monaco and head owned by Albro Navigation Company Inc., Monrovia, Liberia. 

French privateer la Volante of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Jacques Desmellier. Measurement 10 tons, armament of 4 swivels and a crew numbering 27 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer Le Mars of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Louis La Cité Danican. Armament of 56 guns and a crew numbering 541 men. Fitted out for the voyage towards Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Philippe V 1711

Commanding officer Charles Laferre of Calais. Armament of 10 guns and a crew numbering 60 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Atalante 1711

Commanding officer Louis-Francois Lallies of Calais.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Palme of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Jacques le Roy. Measurement 10 tons, armament of 1 gun and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 28 men and 3 boys.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

British offshore supply ship (ex-Fugro Symphony 2011-2017) Global Symphony 2017-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 February 2018

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9492581, MMSI 311049100 and call sign C6YY3. In October 2017 bought the Global Marine Group the cable laying department of the Dutch firm Fugro including the Fugro Symphony. Ex-Fugro Symphony owned and managed by Fugro Rovtech, Aberdeen, Scotland. Built by BMV Laksevaag, Bergen, Norway in 2011. 

Dutch motor clipper ship Ebenhaezer sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 5 May 1933

An item reported that the Dutch motor clipper ship Ebenhaezer of 155 tons and built by Van Goor, Meppel, Netherlands in 1917 was sold by master J. Groenwold, Delfzijl, Netherlands to master Harmsen, Groningen, Netherlands. 

Dutch steel built motor lugger Hyacinth sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 8 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch steel built motor lugger Hyacinth was sold by the shipping company C. v.d. Toorn Jr., Scheveningen, Netherlands to the firm J.J. v.d. Toorn Azn., Scheveningen, Netherlands. 

Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Jacob van Heemskerck) Gele Zee sold towards the Soviet Union according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Jacob van Heemskerck) Gele Zee built by Jonker&Stans, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands in 1921 with a horsepower of 1.100ihp was sold by L. Smit&Co.’s Internationale Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands to Sovtorgflot, Russia.(1) According to the edition dated 17th May renamed Tainfun.

Note
1. Call sign NSWL/PEHD, 515 gross tons, 63 net tons and as dimensions 151.5 x 29.1 x 14.0 (hold) feet. 

Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Gelderland) Java Zee sold towards the Soviet Union according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Gelderland) Java Zee built by Jonker&Stans, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands in 1921 with a horsepower of 1.000ihp was sold by L. Smit&Co,’s Internationale Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands to Sovtorgflot, Russia.(1) According to the edition dated 17th May renamed Chernomor.

Note
1. Call sign PFJQ/PFCF, 449 gross tons, 66 net tons and as dimensions 144.10 x 27.4 x 13.5 (hold) feet.

Dutch steamship (ex-Merwede) Amstelstroom sold towards Iceland according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 March 1934

An item reported the sale of the Dutch steamship (ex-Merwede) Amstelstroom of 1.568 and 935 net tons and built in 1919 by the Haarlemsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij, Haarlem, Netherlands by the N.V. Hollandsche stoomboot Maatschappij, Amsterdam, Netherlands to an Icelandic shipping company. She was to be fitted out with a new tweendeck by Verschure&Co.’s Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Amsterdam, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Call sign NDCW, dimensions 271.8 x 36.8 x 17,5 (hold) feet, horsepower 1.400ihp  and deadweight 1.989 tons. 

Saturday, 17 February 2018

Preliminary design for American battleships USS Pennsylvania (BB38) and Arizona (BB-39) dated 3 September 1912

Nevada-class

Design Pennsyvania-class dated 3 eptember 1912

Pennsylvania-class

USS Arizona
New Mexico

Compared to earlier design was chosen for an internal bulkheads instead for the shell when dealing with the underwater armour. This design dated 24 August but finished on 3rd September was used for building the American battleships USS Pennsylvania (BB 38) (1) and the Arizona (BB-39).(2).

Displacement 31.400 tons and as dimensions 600 (waterline) x 97.0½ (outside armour) x 28.10 (mean draft) feet. Longitudinal coefficient .629. Normal displacement of 31.400 tons: hull complete 13.390 tons, hull fittings 1.293 tons, protection 8.422 tons, steam engineering 2.3909 tons, reserved feed and 2/3 supply 2.05 tons, battery 1/658 tons, ammunition and 2/3 ordnance stores 1.310 tons, equipment, 2/3 equipment stores, outfit and 2/3 stores totally. 1.073 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.548 tons and a margin of 98 tons.

The armament was to consist of 4x3-35,56cm/14”breech loading guns, 22-12,7cm/5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The machinery consisted of turbines and 12 boilers divided over 3 boil rooms. The designed speed was 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots was the range estimated to be 8.000 nautical miles.

The armour consisted of a main side belt with an width of 17’-4/5/8”., depth below the waterline of 8.11 8/8 feet and a thickness of 13½”x 13½” x 8”. Barbettes were protected by 4½”(light part)-13” (heavy part), gun turrets5”(roof)-9/10“(sides)-18 (port), the conning tower 6” (tower tube light)-16” (proper and tower tube heavy), fire control by 16” and the , uptake protection had a thickness of 13”. Further more were a protective deck and a splinter deck available.

Notes
1. Part of the Pennsylvania-class consisting of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. To be built under the 1913 fiscal year was a design asked with 4x3-14” guns, 22-12,7cm/5” guns and a speed of 21 knots and a armour comparable with that of the Nevada-class. At least 10 preliminary designs were proposed of which the 7th was chosen and further worked out. Building ordered on 22 August 1912, laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Newport News on 27 October 1913, launched on 16 March 1915, sponsored by Elizabeth Kolb, commissioned on 12 June 1916, modernized at the Philadelphia Navy Yard 1 June 1929-1931, used during Operation Crossroads nuclear bombs tests at Bikini in July 1946, towed to and decommissioned at Kwajalein Lagoon 29 August 1946, sunk off Kwajalein Atoll on 10 February 1948 and stricken on 19 February 1948.
2. Part of the Pennsylvania-class consisting of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. To be built under the 1913 fiscal year was a design asked with 4x3-14” guns, 22-12,7cm/5” guns and a speed of 21 knots and a armour comparable with that of the Nevada-class. At least 10 preliminary designs were proposed of which the 7th was chosen and further worked out. Building ordered on 4 March 1913, laid down at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on 16 March 1914, launched on 19 June 1915, commissioned on 17 October 1916, modernized at the New York Navy Yard in 1929-1931, including replacing her turbines, sunk during the Japanese aircraft on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 7 December 1941, decommissioned on 20 December 1941 and stricken on 1 December 1942. Her wrecks is still visible. Building costs 16.000.000 US dollars.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-023. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. 

Dutch yacht Cadirij around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Built by the E. I.C. herself on a shipyard along the coast of Java, Dutch East Indies. Departed towards Timor to be used there.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Tijger around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Built in the Dutch East Indies and now repaired at Onrust to be used in the Malayan waters. Could be used for maximum three years.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Henricus around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Well built at a shipyard alongside the coast of Java, Dutch East Indies. Measurement 70 last. Now lying at Onrust for repairs. Expectation was that she still was usable for considerable time.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Snaauw around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Built at the shipyard at Batavia of Kiaten timber. Still to be used as an aviso for some times. Recently sent to Paulo Timoon to search for the ships returning from Japan.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Bataviase Koopman around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Built in the Dutch East Indies. Measurement 70 last. Arrived recently at Batavia, Dutch East Indies from Timor, Dutch East Indies and needed to be keelhauled and her condition to be examined. The expectations were not high while she was quite worse built.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Panamanian oil/chemical tanker Medalta Adventurer 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Cayman Islands-flagged, homeport George Town, IMO 9761451, MMSI 319084600 and call sign ZGFB4. Laid down by Minaminippon Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. Ozai Plant, Ozai Plant, Ozai-Oita, Japan with yard number 746 on 22 August 2014, launched on 22 January 2015 and completed on 7 August 2015. Registered owner FGL Minuet Panama S.A., operated by Waterfront Shipping Company Ltd., Vancouver, BC, Canada and managed by MOL Tankship Management (Europe) Ltd. 

Norwegian general cargo ship (ex-MB Thames 1992-1997, Arklow Feith 1997, MB Thames 1997, Arklow Faith 1007-2005) Romi 2005-

Bahamas off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 February 2018

Nassau-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 8922266, MMSI 308874000 and call sign C6US6. Built by Ferus Smit Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 1992. Ex-MB Thames renamed July 1997, Arklow Feith renamed 16 September 1997, MB Thames renamed 16 September 1997 and Arklow Faith renamed June 2005. 

British steamship Auricula sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 3 May 1934

An item reported that the British steamship Auricula of 1.200 tons deadweight and built by Mackie&Thomson, Glasgow, Scotland in 1901 was sold by A.H. Smith/United Shipping Company Limited, London, England to the N.V. Holland Scheepswerf en machinefabriek, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. She was already for some time laid up at Rouaan, France.

Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 24 sold towards the Soviet Union and renamed Ewen according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 May 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 24 built in 1932 was sold by the firm Van Hattum&Blankevoort, Beverwijk to the Soviet Union and renamed Ewen. Horsepower 450ihp and dimensions 29,20 x 6,50 x 2,85 metres. 

Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 25 sold towards the Soviet Union and renamed Moskowo according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 May 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 25 built in 1933 was sold by the firm Van Hattum&Blankevoort, Beverwijk to the Soviet Union and renamed Moskowo, Horsepower 450ihp and dimensions 29,20 x 6,50 x 2,85 metres. 

British ponton-dredger Baroness sold within England to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 13 July 1934

An item reported that the British steel built ponton-dredger Baroness of 239 gross tons and built y the shipyard of Smulders, Rotterdam, Netherlands (1) in 1904 was sold by the Great Western Railway Company, London, England to the Messres. W.H. Arnott, Young and Company, Manchester, England to be broken up.

Note
1. A.F. Smulders, Schiedam, Netherlands. 

Dutch tug Zambesi sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 August 1934

An item reported that the Dutch tug Zambesi of 322 gross tons and built by Jos.L. Meyer, Papendrecht, Netherlands in 1914 was sold by the Vereenigde Nederlandsche Scheepvaart Maatschappij, The Hague, Netherlands to be broken up. At that moment was she berthed at Mombassa, Kenya  with damage. (1)

Note
1. Owned by the Holland Zuid Afrika Lijn, Amsterdam, Netherlands, call sign QCWD/PIWE, horsepower 575ihp, dimensions 132.10 x 25.8 x 12.0 (hold) feet and 68 net tons. Steel built screw steam tug. 

British armoured frigate HMS Resistance 1859-1898 (1899)

Warrior-class

Defence-class

Part of the Defence-class consisting of the Defence and, Resistance, preceded by the Warrior-class and succeeded by the Hector-class. 
Building ordered on 14 December 1859, laid down by Westwood, Cubitt Yown, London, England on 21 December 1859, launched on 11 April 1861, completed on 5 October 1962, commissioned in July 1862, refitted 1867-1868, Mersey guard ship since 1877, decommissioned at Devonport, England in 1880, used as target for testing armour against the effects of torpedoes and gunfire, sold to be broken up on 11 November 1898, sunk underway to the scrap yard in the Holyhead Bay on 4 May 1899 although later salvaged and broken up at Garston, Liverpool, England. 

Displacement 6.170 tons and as dimensions 85,3 (between perpendiculars)-88,9 (over all) x 16,51 x 8,0 metres or 280-291.4 x 54.2 x 26.2 feet. With the use of watertight transverse bulkheads was the hull divided in 92 compartments and further more was underneath the machinery and boiler rooms a double bottom available. Fitted out with a plough shaped ram. Machinery consisted of a 1-2 cylinder 2.329ihp trunk steam engine with 4 rectangular boilers allowing a speed of 10,5 (under sail)-11,4 knots (under steam sea trials on 25 August 1873). With a coal bunker capacity of 460 tons and a speed of 10 knots was her range 1.670 nautical miles. Ship rigged and with a sail area of 2.276 square metres/24.500 square feet. Barque rigged between September 1864-April 1866. The screw could be lifted out of the water while sailing. Armour of wrought iron consisted of a 11,4cm/4.5” thick belt protecting the hull amidships over a length of 42,7 metres/140 feet stretching from upper deck level to 1,6metres/6 feet below the waterline and bulkheads with a back layer of 46cm/18“ teak. Ship’s ends totally unprotected with a result that the steering gear was also unprotected. Original armament consisted of 20-32pd smoothbore guns, 6-17,78cm/7” 110 pd Armstrong breech loading guns and 10-68pd smoothbore guns. In 1868 rearmed and them 14-17,78cm/7” 6.25 ton rifled muzzle loading guns and 2-20,32cm/8” rifled muzzle loading guns. 

German cruiser SMS Gazelle damaged in torpedo attack off the island Rügen according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 28 January 1915

With our thanks

An item dated Malmö, Sweden 27th reported that a submarine torpedoed the German cruiser Gazelle off the island Rügen. With unknown damage managed the Gazelle to arrive at Sasznitz.(1)

Note
1. Of the Gazelle-class light cruisers consisting of the Gazelle, Niobe, Nymphe, Thetism Araidne, Amazone, Medusa, Frauenlob, Ancona and Undine. Preceded by the Hella and succeeded by the Bremen-class. Builder ordered under the contract name ‘G‘, laid down at the Germaniawerft, Kiel, Germany in 1897, launched on 31 March 1898, commissioned on 15 June 1901, heavily damaged by Russian mines north of Cape Arkoma in the night of 25-26 January 1916, not worth to be repaired and hulked in 1916, served since then as a hulk for minelayers at Danzig, Cuxhaven and since 1918 at Wilhelmshaven, stricken on 28 August 1920 and the same year broken up at Wilhelmshaven

British submarine HMS E 15 lost in the Daradanelles according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 19 April 1915

An item dated Amsterdam Netherlands 18the referred to an announcement at Constantinople, Turkey reporting the sinking of the British submarine E 15 in the Dardanelles and that 3 officers and 21 sailors of her crew including the former British vice-consul at Constantinople were taken prisoner. Her crew numbered 31 men.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Vickers, Barrow, England in October 1912, launched on 23 April 1914, completed in October in 1914, run aground on 16 April 1915 and destroyed by British picket boats armed with torpedoes on 18 April 1915. Remaining parts of her still present in 8 metres deep water off Kepez Point. 

British denied Austrian claim to have destroyed a British cruiser according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 14 June 1915

An item dated Rome, Italy 12th reported that the Austrian claim that a British warship of the Liverpool-class (1) was destroyed was not correct. On last Wednesday she joined an Italian flotilla destroyers for a success raid on the coast of the Gulf of Drino. Afterwards she returned with the Italian vessels to the Italian naval base.

Note
1. This must be the Town-class light cruisers. 

British armoured frigate HMS Defence 1859-1935

Warrior-class

Defence-class

Part of the Defence-class consisting of the Defence and, Resistance, preceded by the Warrior-class and succeeded by the Hector-class. Building ordered on 14 December 1859, laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 24 April 1861, completed on 12 February 1862, commissioned on 4 December 1861, converted into a floating workshop at Devonport, England in 1890, renamed Indus in 1898 and sold at Devonport to be broken up in August 1935.

Displacement 6.170 tons and as dimensions 85,3 (between perpendiculars)-88,9 (over all) x 16,51 x 8,0 metres or 280-291.4 x 54.2 x 26.2 feet. With the use of watertight transverse bulkheads was the hull divided in 92 compartments and further more was underneath the machinery and boiler rooms a double bottom available. Fitted out with a plough shaped ram. Machinery consisted of a 1-2 cylinder 2.329ihp trunk steam engine with 4 rectangular boilers allowing a speed of 10,5 (under sail)-11,23 knots (under steam sea trials on 25 August 1873). With a coal bunker capacity of 460 tons and a speed of 10 knots was her range 1.670 nautical miles. Ship rigged and with a sail area of 2.276 square metres/24.500 square feet. Barque rigged between September 1864-April 1866. The screw could be lifted out of the water while sailing. Armour of wrought iron consisted of a 11,4cm/4.5” thick belt protecting the hull amidships over a length of 42,7 metres/140 feet stretching from upper deck level to 1,6metres/6 feet below the waterline and bulkheads with a back layer of 46cm/18“ teak. Ship’s ends totally unprotected with a result that the steering gear was also unprotected. Original armament consisted of 20-32pd smoothbore guns, 6-17,78cm/7” 110 pd Armstrong breech loading guns and 10-68pd smoothbore guns. In 1868 rearmed and them 14-17,78cm/7” 6.25 ton rifled muzzle loading guns and 2-20,32cm/8” rifled muzzle loading guns. 

French privateer les Jeux of Dunkirk 1704

Commanding officer Nicolas de Lambert. Measurement 200 tons, armament of 36 guns and a crew numbering 225 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Grande Famille of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Francois Lantmeter. Armament of 4 swivels and a crew numbering 18 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Espérance of Dunkirk 1705

Commanding officer Lieven.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Dutch general cargo ship Tracer 1999-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 February 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9204702, MMSI 245949000 and call sign PHAC. Owned and managed by Biglift Shipping, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Built by Hudong Zhonghua Shipbuilding Grouep, Shanghai, China in 1999. 

Italian bark Prospero&Davide arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Italian bark Prospero&Davide master Olivari coming from New York, USA, shipping agents B. van Leeuwen&Co. 

Russian ship Primus cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 20th reported the departure of the Russian ship Primus master Heine towards Cheribon, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Loudon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 20th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Loudon master Presuner towards Telok Betong, Bencul, Padang, Analaboe and Atjeh, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Horsepower 190hp, homeport Batavia, call sign TDLS and net capacity 2.434,10 cubic metres/860,10 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

British steamship Port Victor underway from the Dutch East Indies towards Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the departure of the British steamship Port Victor master Bird underway towards Port Saïd, Egypt for further orders. 

Friday, 16 February 2018

Danish oil/chemical tanker Hafnia Lotte 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9732694, MMSI 249329000 and call sign 9HA4201. Built by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, Chinas as Guangzhou 13130065 in 2017. Owned and managed by Hafnia Management, Hellerup, Denmark. 

French privateer la Notre Dame de Bon Secours of Dunkirk 1710

Commanding officer Daniel Oedyn. Crew numbering 18 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Petit Marc Antoine of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Dominique Pand. Measurement 18 tons, armament of 4 guns and a crew numbering 29 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Trompeuse 1711

Commanding officer Jacques de Pautonnier, of Saint Malo. Measurement 50 tons, armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 74 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Seaplanes of Royal Netherlands Navy visiting the naval air station De Mok. Noorder Buiten Spaarne in July 1928

Noord-Hollands Archief. Source

The organisation of the Bulgarian navy according to a CIA report dated 27 June 1951

An item reported that the staff of the Bulgarian navy was added to the Ministry of National Defence at Sofia, Bulgaria. The sailors were recruited in the military districts and had to serve for four years.

Varna (Asparuk section in the past named Sev Sevmes) was the major naval base of Bulgaria. It possessed also a dry dock for repairs.

Ruse was the major naval base for the Danube river forces consisting mainly of small motor boats and launches with no heavier armament as machineguns.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008000300010-3

Romanian and Soviet warships sighted at Galata and Braila, Romania according to a CIA report dated 20 May 1952

An item reported that in mid March 1956 the Soviet M1 and M2 naval craft armed with 3 guns probably 15cm/5.9” and a Romania 3-funnelled destroyer were sighted at Galati, Romania. At Braila, Romania were a seagoing minesweeper the DB 12, 3 seagoing minesweepers under construction and two unarmed monitors sighted.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R012100130008-9

Soviet Union interested in founding naval base at Wonsan, North Korea according to a CIA report dated 24 July 1952

An item reported that North Korea approved the plan of the Soviet Union to built a naval base at Wonsan as soon as the peace treaty was signed.(1) According to a Soviet statement dated 25th June was such a base needed to protect the oil transports underway from Sakhalin via the Sea of Japan against imaginary attacks of the Japanese navy.

Note
1. The North Korean War between 25 June 1950 and 27 July 1953 was between North and South Korea. North Korea was supported by China and the Soviet Union while South Korea was supported by the United Nations.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R013000340004-0

Dornier flying boat of the Royal Netherlands Navy 1928-1933

Noord-Hollands Archief. Source

Dutch ship Zwaan 1641

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, merchant ship hired in 1641, sunk in action in 1641, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 134 x 28½ x 13¼, height above hold 6½, an armament of 30-32 guns and a crew numbering 89-100 men.

Dutch warship Zuiderhuis 1653-1676

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built by Herman Mighielse at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1653, last mentioned in 1676, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 130 x 32 x 13-13½, height above hold 7, an armament of 32-56 guns (1654: 4 bronze 18 pd guns, 4 bronze 1pd gun, 4-6pd guns called draken/dragons, 16 iron 12pd guns, 4 iron 8pd guns) and a crew numbering 190-220 (including 30 soldiers) men. Commanding officers 1656 captain W. van der Zaen as flagship towards the Mediterranean, there in squadron De Ruyter, 1665 Joost Verschuer/Verschuijr, participated in the battle of Lowestoft on 13 June 1665, 1667 Th. Fabritius, 1673 I. Uitterwijk, participated in the battle of Schooneveld on 28 May.

Dutch ship Zwarte Ruiter 1573

Fitted out at Amsterdam for Spanish fleet in 1573.

Dutch warship Zwarte Leeuw 1603

Of the admiralty Zealand, mentioned in 1603.

Dutch fire ship Zwarte Hond 1652

Of the admiralty Zealand, mentioned in 1652.

Canadian oil products tanker (ex-Seafronter 2001) Seafrontier 2011-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 February 2018

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9457268, MMSI 477881600 and call sign VRHA3. Ex-Seafronter renamed 25 February 2011. Owned and managed by Valles Steamship Canada, Vancouver, Canada. Built by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2011

Dutch motor lugger Maria sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 8 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch steel built motor lugger Maria was sold by the shipping company C. v.d. Toorn Jr., Scheveningen, Netherlands to the firm J.J. v.d. Toorn Azn., Scheveningen, Netherlands. 

German steamship Consul Suckau sold towards France according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 16 June 1933

An item reported that the Dutch bank Nederlandsche Scheepshypotheekbank, Rotterdam, Netherlands sold the former German steamship Consul Suckau towards France. 

Danish cabinet to forbade Dutch and German sailing vessels to participate in Danish coastal trade according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 December 1932

An item reported that the union of Danish ship owners of sailing vessels asked the Danish cabinet to forbade Dutch and German sailing vessels smaller than the 150 register tons to be active in the Danish coastal trade. There were still some Dutch masters active there and for who this would be disastrous. 

Dutch bark Ortelius cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 26 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 24th August reported the departure of the Dutch bark Ortelius master Janssonius towards Eiland Amsterdam.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PNMG, homeport Schiedam,Netherlands and net capacity 1.802,16 cubic metres/636,16 tons of 2,83 cubic metres.

Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Loudon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 6 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 6th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship G.G. Loudon master Preusner towards Tjilatjap, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Gouverneur Generaal Loudon, call sign TDLS, homeport Batavia, horsepower 190 hp and net capacity 2.434,10 cubic metres/860.10 tons of 2,83 cubic mete

French oil/chemical tanker (ex- Bro Etienne 2004-2009) Maersk Etienne 2009-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 February 2018

Denmark International register -flagged, homeport Copenhagen, Denmark, IMO 9274642, MMSI 219577000 and call sign OWOQ2. Ex-Bro Etienne renamed October 2009. Built by Jinling Shipyard, Nanjing, China in 2004. Owned and managed by Maersk Tankers France, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. 

Thursday, 15 February 2018

Dutch steam cargo ship Helena sold towards Turkey and renamed Atilla according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 16 December 1932

An item reported that the steam cargo ship Helena was sold by W.H. van der Zee, Alexandria, Egypt to Kirzade Sevki ne Surekasi, Istanbul, Turkey and renamed Atilla. Built by Blyth S.B.&Dry Dock Company, Blyth, England in 1907. Of 1.201 gross register tons and 1.875 ton capacity.(1)

Note
1. In 1930: call sign NWDM, 783 net register tons, dimensions 234.8 x 34.6 x 15.1 (hold) feet and 800ihp. 

Japan building her own pocket battleship Suzuya according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

Sister ship Mogami og the Japanese Suzuya
Source Dutch magazine Onze Vloot dated June 1936, p. 79, drawing by E.Th. Poppe

German Admiral Graf Spee

An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittime dated October 1934 which on her turn used the British naval magazine The Navvy as source for reporting that Japan was building at Yokosuka, Japan a 10.000 tons cruiser (1) similar to the German pocket battleship Deutschland and would be the most modern ship within the Japanese navy.(2)

Notes
1. This must be the Suzuya of the Mogami-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Mogami, Mikuma, Suzuya and Kumano. Building ordered under the 1931 Fiscal Year, laid down by Yokosuka Naval Arsenal on 11 December 1933, launched on 20 November 1934, commissioned on 31 October 1937, sunk in the Battle of Samar on 25 October 1944 and stricken on 20 December 1944.  Displacement 8.500 (official)-13.670 (final) tons and as dimensions 200,6 x 20,2 x 5,9 metres or 658 x 66 x 19 feet. Speed 35,5 (final)-37 (initial) and a range of 8.032 miles with a speed of 14 knots and heavy oil bunker capacity of 2.243 tons. Crew numbered 850-950. Armament consisted of 5x3-15.5cm/6.1“ guns, 4x2-12,7cm/5” guns, 4x1-4cm anti aircraft guns and 4x3-61cm/24“ torpedo tubes. Armour consisted of a 10-12,5cm thick belt, a 3,5-6cm thick deck and the turrets protected by 2,5cm.
2. Of the Deutschland-class armoured ships well known as pocket battleships later classified as heavy cruisers. Laid down by Reichsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 1 October 1932, launched on 30 June 1934, commissioned on 6 January 1936, after the Battle of the River Plata with British/New Zealand cruisers on 13 December, scuttled by her own crew in the harbour of Montevideo, Uruguay on 17 December 1939. Displacement 14.890 (design)-17.280 (full load) tons and as dimensions 186 x 21,65 x 7,34 metres or 610.3 x 71.0 x 24.1 feet. Speed 2,8 knots and with a speed of 18,69 a range of 16.300 nautical miles. Crew numbered 951-1.070 men. Armament consisted of 2x3-28cm/11” guns, 8x1-15cm/5.9” guns and 8-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes. Armour consisted of a 8cm/3.1” thick belt, a 1,7cm/0.67”-4,5cm/1.77” thick deck with the main gun turrets protected by 14cm/5.5”. 

US Navy planning to use the atoll French Frigate Shoals according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the Proceedings dated January 1936 reporting that the atoll French Frigate Shoals with a diameter of 2 miles was a excellent landing location for seaplanes.(1)

Note
1. Atoll in the North western Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean. The US Navy built aft the Battle of Midway (June 1942) a naval air station on Tern Island. 

US Navy planned seaplane base on Johnston Atoll according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the Proceedings dated January 1936 reporting that Johnston Island recently handed over to the US Navy department was a sand island in the Pacific pointing out of the ocean and suitable for establishing a naval air station.(1)

Note
1. Johnston Atoll or Kalama Atoll, unincorporated territory of the USA United States Minor Outlying Island]. In 1935 started the USA with preparations for use as seaplane base and since then was Sand Island seaplane base increased. In September 1941 was started with founding the Johnston Island Air Force Base.

Canal through Florida planned connecting the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated December 1935 reporting that a budget of 5 million US dollars was made available for preparing the realisation of a canal crossing Florida and connection the Gulf of Mexico with the Atlantic Ocean. The result was an increase of voyage with 700 nautical miles reducing annual transport costs with about 7,5 million US dollars. Total costs between 99-119 million US dollars. 

Dutch general cargo ship (ex-Claudia 1999-2010) Lady Claudia 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 February 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9201798, MMSI 245772000 and call sign PCHE. Ex-Claudia renamed September 2010. Owned and managed by Wijnnen&Barends, Delfzijl, Netherlands. Built by Niestern Sander Delfzijl, Delfzijl, Netherlands. 

French privateer la Fortune 1711

Commanding officer Jean Ruys called Grelachs of Dieppe. Armament of 4 guns and a crew numbering 22 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Satyre of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Jean Ruys called Grelachs. Measurement 8 tons and a crew numbering 20 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Fortune of Dunkirk 1703-1704

Commanding officer Pierre Maissonneuve. Measurement 70 tons, armament of 12 guns and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 70 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925. 

French privateer la Diane of Dunkirk 1707

Commanding officer Pierre Maissonneuve.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925. 

French privateer la Fortune 1708

Commanding officer Pierre Mandret of Morlaix. Measurement 40 tons, armament of 10 guns and a crew numbering 70 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Japanese bulk carrier (ex-Tomoshio 2009-2012) African Sunbird 2012-




Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 February 2018

Panama-flagged, IMO 9397884, MMSI 354222083 and call sign 3FBY. Ex-Tomoshio renamed October 2012. Owned y Misuga Kaiun, Tokyo, Japan and managed by Misuga Kaiun Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Built by Mitsui Tamano Engineering&Shipbuilding, Tamano, Japan in 2009. 

Dutch steam trawler Urania (IJM 65) sold in the Netherlands and renamed Spaarnestroom (IJM 64) according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 November 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Urania (IJM 65) of the bankrupt N.V. Stoomvisscherij Mij. Die Seelvisch was sold to L. Parlevliet Dzn. and and Fred. Ossendorp. She laid up for quite what time and was o be recommissioned as Spaarnestroom. Dimensions 32,72 x 6,45 x 11,66 meters and 180,09 gross register tons. The edition dated 2 December 1932 reported that the Spaarnestroom (IJM 64) was again sold. New owner became Gebr. Deker, Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands. 

French steamship Suzanne et Mariesold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 November 1932

An item reported that the Dutch scrap yard Scheepsslooperij De Koophandel, Nieuwe-Lekkerland, Netherlands bought the French steamship Suzanne et Marie from the Fa. Worm Worms&Cie., Le Havre, France for 650 pond sterling to break her up. Built by Lobnitz&Co., Renfrew, Scotland in 1901 of 1.644 gross register tons. 

Dutch steam trawler Aneta (IJM 82) and renamed Witte Zee (IJM 82) according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 September 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Aneta (IJM 82) was sold by the bankrupt N.V. Visscherij Mij. Aneta, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to Frater Smit&Prins and renamed Witte Zee (IJM 82) again taken into service. 

North Korean Navy transport active in the Chinnamp’o port according to a CIA report dated 3 October 1952

An item reported that in begin May a transport unit of the North Korean Navy consisting of 6 boats with totally 60 men was occupied with transporting supplies from Chinnamp’o towards Cho-do (125.03&37.59) and nearby islands.

Note
1. The North Korean War between 25 June 1950 and 27 July 1953 was between North and South Korea. North Korea was supported by China and the Soviet Union while South Korea was supported by the United Nations.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R014100280001-8.

North Korean Navy units sighted at Samp’ot’ap on 20 June 1952 according to a CIA report dated 3 October 1952

An item reported that on 20 June 1952 wo patrol boats and a small transport belonging to the North Korean Navy were sighted at Samp’ot’ap (124.41&39.56), one kilometre west of Yongamp’o. The patrol vessels were lying side by side in a reeded costal area on the position 124.21&39,56, 400 metres northwest of the former grain warehouse and at low tide marooned on dry land. With the use is dry yellow reeds bundles was tried to camouflage the boats. It were two different types. One grey painted was armoured, had as dimensions 20 x 4,5 metres and fitted out with 1-150hp engine. The second wood built boat was smaller with as dimensions 18 x 4 metres and just a lees powerful engine with just 90hp. The transport was anchored during the night on a position of 1 kilometres west of the grain warehouse and no attempts were done to camouflage her. At daytime she transported gravel between Yongdae-san (12420&39.56) and a location 2 kilometres north of Yongamp’o probably to construct a bank. A navy company of the navy was stationed at a former grain warehouse located 900 metres west of Yongamp’o on the position 124.21&39.56. In a comment was remarked that this was presumably the former grain warehouse of Samp’ot’ao.

Note
1. The North Korean War between 25 June 1950 and 27 July 1953 was between North and South Korea. North Korea was supported by China and the Soviet Union while South Korea was supported by the United Nations.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R014100280001-8.

Dutch oil chemical tanker Stolt Shearwater 1998-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Cayman Islands-flagged, homeport Georgetown, IMO 9148958, MMSI 319402000 and call sign ZCRD9. Built by Inma, La Sepzia, Italy in 1998. Owned and managed by Stolt Tankers, Rotterdam, Netherlands. 

French privateer le S. Aubin 1707

Commanding officer Jean de Marguery of Saint Malo. Measurement ,armament of 18 guns and 1 swivel and a crew numbering 61 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Marquis de Château of Dunkirk 1705

Commanding officer Massé. 

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Charmant 1711

Commanding officer Herbert Portaré of Brest. Measurement 80 tons, armament of 12-3pd guns and a crew numbering 86 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Heureux-Retour 1712-1713

Commanding officer Dominique Potier from Calais. Measurement 40 tons, armament of 8 guns and a crew numbering 55 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

British containership CSAV Tyndall 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9627928, MMSI 636016321 and call sign DSFN8. Owned and managed by Zodiac Maritime, London, United Kingdom. Built by Daewoo Mangalia Heavy Industries, Mangalia, Romania in 2014. 

Dutch sailing lugger Johan Reindert (KW 116) sold in the Netehrlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 9 July 1937

An item reported that the Dutch sailing lugger Johan Reindert (KW 116) was sold towards Pernis, Netherlands to be broken up. 

French trawler Brodagain sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 9 July 1937

An item reported that the French trawler Brodagain was sold by the firm P. Planchat, Dieppe, France to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

French trawler Acotz sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 9 July 1937

An item reported that the French trawler Acotz was sold by the firm P. Planchat, Dieppe, France to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Wednesday, 14 February 2018

South Korean container ship (ex-Hanjin Seattle 2011-2017, SM Norfolk 2017-2017) MSC Savannah 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9461477, MMSI 636018058 and call sign D5NZ3. Built by Hyundai Samho HeavyIndustries, Samsho, South Korea in 2011. Owned by Korea Tonnage No. 28 Shipping Company, chartered by MSC-Mediterranean Shipping Company, managed by SM Line Corporation, Seoul, South Korea and technical managed by KLCSM Company Limited. As the Hanjin Seattle Panama-flagged, MMSI 356941000, owned by Gearbulk Norway, Bergen, Norway and managed by Hanjin Shipping, Seoul, South Korea. 

Japan building merchant ships suitable to be converted into auxiliary cruises according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the Jap. Chr. dated 15 November 1934 reporting that admiral Cone stated that Japan built since 1929 34 cargo ships suitable to be converted into auxiliary cruisers. Just one was slower as 15 knots and 21 however at least 18 knots. The ships were still not registered by Lloyds. The USA had not a single cargo ship able to maintain a speed of 15 knots. The Japanese ship Azumasan Maru seemed already to be fitted out with gun mountings. 

Russian submarines potential threat for Japanese shipping according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the Jap. Chr. dated 15 November 1934 reporting that Japan always stated that submarine were defence and not offensive weapons for which reason she was against the disposal. However since the rumours that Russian stationed submarines at Vladivostok changed the Japanese opinion apparently while the press wrote that the submarines were a threat for the Japanese shipping. 

France and Japan seeking parity with the fleets of the other major naval powers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 13 October 1935 in which Henri Bernay wrote that he hoped part of the Japanese proposals for parity were accepted by the major powers. He said that France just like Japan was offended by the Washington Naval Treaty by denying the moral and material prestige of both countries world wide.(1)

Note
1. The Second London Naval Treaty signed on 25 March 1936 was a failure while Japan and Italy did not sign her. She was to expire in 1942 but the outbreak of the Second World War on 1 September 1939 in fact ended it. 

German oil/chemical tanker (ex-Baltic Admiral 2004, Ruby 2004-2006, King Edward 2006-2016) CPO Larisa Athena 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 February 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9290490, MMSI 538090500 and call sign V7UK6. Owned by MT Larisa Athe GmbH&Co. KG and operated by Claus-Peter Offen Tankschiffreederei GmbH&Co. KG. Ex-Baltic Admiral renamed December 2004, Ruby renamed 25 November 2006 and King Edward renamed June 2016. As King Edward Marshall Islands-flagged, MMSI 538090266 and call sign V7GQ4 and owned and managed by Scorship Navigation, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2004. 

French trawler Brigitte sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 9 July 1937

An item reported that the French trawler Brigitte was sold by the firm P. Planchat, Dieppe, France to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler Walrus sold in the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 9 July 1937

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Walrus of 162 tons gross tonnage and built in 1903 was sold by the N.V. Scheepsexploitatie Maatschappij de Marezaten, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to a shipyard at Pernis, Netherlands to be broken up. 

German steam lugger Falke sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 July 1937

An item reported that the German steam lugger Falke of 152 tons gross tonnage and built in 1908 by the firm M. v.d. Kuyl, Slikkerveer, Netherlands was decommissioned and sold to be broken up. 

Greek LPG tanker Kithnos 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 February 2018

Greece-flagged, IMO 9711523, MMSI 241410000 and call sign SVCH5. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea as Hyundai Mipo 8166 in 2016. Owned and managed by Eletson, Athens, Greece. 

French privateer le Barentin of Dunkirk 1712

Commanding officer Jean Pour. Measurement 150 tons, armament of 28 guns and a crew numbering 180 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Galère de Dunkerque of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Jean Pour. Measurement 200 tons, armament of 30 guns and a crew numbering 330 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925. 

French privateer la Fortune of Dunkirk 1707-1709

Commanding officer Jean Pour. Measurement 60 tons, armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 160 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.