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Sunday, 26 March 2017

New British torpedo motorboats performed well according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

An item referred to the Proceedings dated March 1937 reporting that the new British torpedo motor boats performed very well during stormy weather and high seas off Portsmouth, England by achieving speed of 20-30 miles. 

New classification for British sloops according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

An item referred to the magazine R.U.S.I. dated February 1937 reporting that the British Royal navy would name patrol sloops and convoy escorts in the future just escort vessels, sloop minesweepers and coastal sloops respectively minesweeper and patrol vessel. 

Canada intended to built minesweepers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 1 April 1937 reporting the intention to built 4 minesweepers by Canadian shipyards on behalf of the Canadian navy. 

Personnel strength of Dutch torpedo service increased according to the Dutch newspaper Vliegend blaadje dated 23 January 1884

An item dated Den Helder, Netherlands 23rd reported that several naval officers were transferred to the naval torpedo service at Den Helder. 

Danish privateer Steinbill according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

With an armament of 10 guns and a crew numbering 30 men. Captured by the British HMS Tweed (1) captain Symonds in the North Sea in October 1810.

Note
1. 18 Guns sloop launched at Iremonger, Littlehampton on 10 January 1807 and wrecked in 1813. 

Danish privateer Neptune according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

With an armament of 5 guns and a crew numbering 24 men. Captured by the British HMS Cretan (1) captain Payne on 28 October 1810.

Note
1. 16 Guns brig sloop, former French and Italian captured in 1808 and sold in 1814. 

French privateer Somnambule according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

Armament 18 guns and a crew numbering 56 men. Captured and later sunk by the British HMS Apelles (1) captain Oliver in October 1810.

Note
1. 14 Guns brig sloop, launched at Woolwich Dockyard, England on 10 August 1808 and sold in 1816. 

French brig privateer Edouard according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

Armament 14 guns, a crew numbering 90 men and a tonnage of 210 tons. Captured on the Irish station by the British HMS Sybille (1)captain Upton in October 1810.

Note
1. 44 Guns 5th rate, former French captured in 1794 and sold in 1833. 

French lugger privateer l. Hirondelle according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

Armament 4 guns and a crew numbering 30 men. Captured by the British HMS Niobe (1) captain Loring on 21 October 1810.

Note
1. 38 Guns 5th rate former French Diane captured in 1800 and broken up in 1816. 

Saturday, 25 March 2017

Russian Delta-III class ballistic missile nuclear submarine (project 667BDR Kal‘mar) 1974-


Double hulled consisting of a thin low magnetic steel made outer hull and thicker inner pressure hull. For safety reasons is the hull divided into 10 waterproof compartments. Preceded by the Delta II class and succeeded by the Delta IV and the Typhoon classes. For the original design is a subclass derived from special purposes (Project 09786). There were 14 Delta III submarines completed at the Severnoye Mashinostroitelnoye Predpriyatie, Severodvinsk of which the first (K-424) was laid down on 30 January 1974 and the last one (K-44_ on 31 January 1970, commissioned on 17 September 1982 and still n service after major modernisations.

Displacement 10.600 (surfaced)-13.700 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 155 x 11,7 x 8,7 metres or 509 x 38 x 29 feet. Diving depth 320 (operational)-400 (maximum) metres. Horsepower 60.000 shp. Speed 14 (surface)-24 (submerged) knots. Crew numbered 130 (included 40 officers) persons. The armament consisted of 4-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes in the bow for which 16 torpedoes were carried and further more 16 RSM-50-R-29R Vysota missiles. 

Russian submarine search and rescue ship Igor Belousov 2005-


Project number 21300 Delfin. Dimensions 97,8 x 17,2 x 10,6 (depth amidships) metres and a full load displacement p 5.037 tons. Maximum speed 15 knots, With an economic speed 12 knots) is her range 3.500 nautical miles and bale to stay 30 days at sea. Crew numbered 96 men with an addition accommodation for 120 persons (60 in pressure chambers). Laid down at the Admiralty Shipyards, St. Petersburg, Russia on 24 December 2005, launched on 31 October 2012, sea trials in 2014-2015,  was she to be delivered in 2015. Originally planned to be commissioned in 2010. Armed with 2x10 5,5cm DP-65 grenade launchers (560 RG-55M grenades), a 9K38 Igla SAM system for 12-8M39 missiles and further more is she fitted out with a helipad. 

England modernizing old battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

Queen Elizabeth-class


With our thanks for allowing us to published

An item referred to the U.S.R. dated 25 February 1937 that against the end of the year the British battleships Valiant (1) , Queen Elizabeth (2) and Renown (3) were lying at naval yards to be fitted out with new turbines. The British Royal Navy possessed as that moment 15 battleships.

Notes
1. Part of the Queen Elizabeth-class consisting of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 02. Laid down at Fairfield, Clydebank, Scotland on 31 January 1913, launched on 4 November 1914, completed in February 1916, commissioned on 13 January 1916, modernized 1929-1930 and March 1937-November 1939, decommissioned in July 1945 and sold to be broken up on 19 March 1948 by Arnott Young at Cairnryan, Scotland in 1948. Building costs 2.537.037 pond sterling.
2. Part of the Queen Elizabeth-class consisting of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 00. Laid down at the Portsmouth Royal Dockyard on 21 October 1912, launched on 16 October 1913, completed in January 1914, commissioned on 22 December 1914, stricken on 7 July 1948 and sold to Arnott Young and broken up at Dalmuir, Scotland.
3. Battle cruiser of the Renown-class consisting of the Renown and Repulse, building ordered on 30 December 1914, laid down by Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 25 January 1915, launched on 4 March 1916, commissioned on 20 September 1916 and sold to be broken up on 19 March 1948. 

The armament of the new British battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

King George V-class

An item referred to the Proceedings dated March 1937 reporting that the new British battleships (1) were to be armed with 4x3-35,6cm guns, 12-15cm guns, 8-11,8cm anti aircraft guns and small calibre automatic guns. Further more were 4 planes carried. It was possible to by filling the ballast tanks during a battle to increase the draught decreasing her fragility by offering a smaller target.

Note
1. King George V-class consisting of the King George V, Howe, Duke of York, Prince of Wales and Anson of 42.923 tons deep displacement and an main armament of 5x2-36cm/14” Mark VII guns. 

Oil tanks of Singapore well visible for air reconnaissance according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

An item referred to the U.S.R. dated 11 February 1937 reporting that the fact that the oil tanks of the base at Singapore without any problems could be traced and recognized by aircraft was an understandable shortcoming.

Sir Samuel Hoare (1) confirmed in the House of Commons that the oil tanks were standing on the ground but that seriously was examined of the tanks could be placed underground.

Note
1. Samuel John Gurney Hoare 1st Viscount Templewood (24 February 1880 London, England-7 May 1959 London, England), Conservative politician, First Lord of the Admiralty 1936-1937, Home Secretary 28 May 1937-3 September 1939, but earlier Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Secretary of State for India and Secretary of State for air. 

Dutch bark Melati underway from the Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 6 June 1889

A telegram dated reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch ship Melati underway from Rotterdam, Netherlands towards Cheribon, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Bark, homeport Rotterdam, call sign PLST, net capacity 3.286,31 cubic metres/1.160,06 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch steamship Zuid-Holland underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 3 June 1889

An item dated 1st reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch steamship Zuid-Holland underway from Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards Rotterdam, Netherlands. 

Dutch screw steamship Drenthe arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 3 June 1889

An item dated 1st reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch steamship Drenthe underway from Rotterdam, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. She arrived there on the 2nd coming from Rotterdam and Marseille, France, shipping agents Rotterdamsche Lloyd.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship, call sign NMHF, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 4.924,67 cubic metres/1.738,41 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch 3-mast schooner Alice arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from Australia according to the Dutch newspaper Javabode dated 7 March 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 6th reported the arrival of the Dutch 3-mast schooner Alice master Krijgsman underway from Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, shipping agents N.I. Gasfabriek.(1)

Note
1. A day earlier called a steamship. 

Dutch steamship Alice arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from Australia according to the Dutch newspaper Javabode dated 6 March 1889

An item dated 5th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch steam ship Alice loaded with coal coming from Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.(1)

Note
1. A day later called a 3-mast schooner. 

Belgian trawler Mooie Meid (Z-296) 2000-

Inner Harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2017

Belgium-flagged, homeport Zeebrugge, IMO 9242807, MMSI 205303000 and callsign OLLJ.

Dutch fishing vessel De Vrouw Jannetje (ARM-15) 1988-

Inner Harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, IMO 8810774, MMSI 245542000 and callsign PDRE. Owned and managed by Meulmeesterschaier, Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1988. 

Dutch fishing vessel (ex-Sola Gratia 2002-2009), Tempus Fugit (ARM-33) 2009-

Tweede Binnenhaven, Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8985141, MMSI 245331000 and call sign PBFH. Ex-Sola Gratia renamed November 2009. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellingdam, Netherlands in 2002. According to marinetraffic renamed Maarten Cornelis

Dutch trawler Neeltje Jannetje (ARM 44) 1985-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, Netherlands, IMO 8509492, MMSI 245148000 and call sign PGFT. Owned and managed by Geertruida Rederij, Urk, Netherlands. Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1985. 

American and Dutch warships visiting Singapore according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 No. 3

American Northampton-class heavy cruisers

Dutch cruiser Hr. Ms. Java

Dutch cruiser Hr.Ms. Sumatra 

An item referred to the magazine R.U.S.I. dated February 1937 reporting that mid 1936 a large number of American and Dutch warships were visiting Singapore at the same time Mr. Kenneth Lindsay (1), Civil Lord of the British Admiralty underway towards Australia visited Singapore. Of the US Navy were the cruiser USS Augusta (2) with 12 destroyers coming from Manila, Philippines and from the Royal Netherlands Navy the cruisers Hr. Ms. Java (3) and Sumatra (4), 3 destroyers, 4 submarines and a squadron floatplanes. Of the British Royal Navy were the cruiser HMS Dane (5), the survey vessel Herald (6) and the monitor Terror (7) present.

Notes
1. Kenneth Martin Lindsay (16 September 1897-4 March 1991), Labour Party politician who was CiVil Lord between 1935-1937.
2. Building ordered on 18 December 1924, building awarded on 13 June 1927, laid down by Newport News Shipbnuilding, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 2 July 1928, launched by Miss Evelyn McDaniel on 1 February 1930, commissioned on 30 January 1931, reclassified from CL-31 into CA-31 on 1 July 1931, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to Robert Benjamin, Panama City, Florida, USA be broken up on 9 November 1959. She was however not earlier removed from the custody of the US Navy as by 2 March 1960. Part of the Northampton-class heavy cruisers.
3. Laid down at the Koninklijke Maatschappij De Schelde at Flushing, Netherlands on 31 May 1916, launched on 9 August 1921 and lost on 27 February 1942 during the battle in the Java Sea. Due to lacking material caused by the First World War and enough budget was her launching and completion delayed. After the approval of the budget for 1919 was the building of the Java and her sister ship Sumatra continued. During the trials in June-July 1924 suffered she from fire. Despite the damage were the trials very successful and afterwards was she finally repaired. Commissioned on 1 May 1925. The ships were built based on a Krupp-design but in fact were both ships already outdated before they even were commissioned.
4. Laid down at the yard of the Nederlandsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij at Amsterdam on 15 July 1916, launched 19 December 1920, scuttled as a block ship off Quistreham, France as part of an artificial harbour which was never realized. The wreck was sold in February 1951 to Persia [Iran] to be broken up. Due to lacking material caused by the First World War, enough budget and the loss of her turbines by fire was her launching and completion delayed. After the approval of the budget for 1919 was the building of the Sumatra and her sister ship Java continued. The ships were built based on a Krupp-design but in fact were both ships outdated before they even were commissioned.
5. This must be the Danae-class light cruiser Danae laid down at Armstrong Whitworth, Walker-on-Tyne, England on 1 December 1916, launched on 26 January 1918, commissioned on 26 January 1918, decommissioned on 4 October 1944, transferred to Poland and commissioned as the Jozef Konrad Korzeniowski on 4 October 1944, decommissioned on 28 September 1946, given back to the United Kingdom retaining her original name and decommissioned, decommissioned on 22 January 1948 and broken up at Barrow on 27 March 1948.
6. The former 24-class minesweeping sloop Merry Hampton launched in 1918, converted into the survey ship Herald in 1923, scuttles at Seletar, Singapore in 1942 but salvaged and repaired by the Japanese who renamed her Helyo before she finally sunk after hitting a mine in 1944.
7. Laid down by Harland and Wolff, Belfast, Ireland on 26 October 1915, launched on May 1916, commissioned in August 1916 and sunk off Derna, Libya on 23 February 1941. 

Danish privateer Ziska according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

Armament 6 guns. Captured by the British HMS Fisguard (1) captain Maison on 30 April 1810.

Note
1. 44 Guns 5th Rate Fishgard, captured as the French Resistance in 1797 and sold in 1814. 

Danish privateer Juliana according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

Armament 6 guns. Captured by the British HMS Fisguard (1) captain Maison on 29 April 1810.

Note
1. 44 Guns 5th Rate Fishgard, captured as the French Resistance in 1797 and sold in 1814. 

Danish cutter privateer Swan according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

Armament 6 guns and a crew numbering 35 men. Destroyed by boats of the British HMS Woodlark (1)lieutenant T. Crawford on 27th May 1810 off the island of Laffoc.(2)

Notes
1. Cherokee-class 16 guns brig sloop, launched by Rowe, Newcastle, England on 17 November 1808 and sold on 29 January 1818.
2. The London Gazette reported that the Woodlark was commanded by captain Watts by that Crawford commanded the boats. The Swan was lying under the batteries and field artillery. 

French privateer Grand Napoleon according to the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and Review, vol. 1, 1810

With an armament of 16 guns, a tonnage of 280 tons  and a crew numbering 124 men. Captured by the British HMS Helena (1) commanded by Worth on 18th April

Note
1. 18-Gun sloop, launched at Preston, Yarmouth, England on 26 April 1804 and sold on 21 July 1814. 

Friday, 24 March 2017

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pyramus 1896-1920

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England in May 1896, launched on 15 May 1897, completed in 1900 and sold to be broken up on 21 April 1920.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Proserpine 1896-1919

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at the Sheerness Dockyard in March 1896, launched on 5 December 1896, decommissioned on 28 November 1901 and sold to be broken up on 30 November 1919.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Prometheus 1897-1914

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down by Earle’s  Shipbuilding, Hull, England in 1897, launched on 20 October 1898, armed at Sheerness, England in 1899, completed in early January 1900, part of the Medway Fleet Reserve, commissioned in 1900 and sold to be broken up on 28 May 1914.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Psyche 1897-1915 and Australian HMAS Psyche 1915-1918

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at the Devonport Dockyard, England on 15 November 1897, launched on 19 July 1898, commissioned on 2 May 1899, decommissioned on 22 January 1915, handed over to Australia on 1 July 1915, commissioned on 1 July 1915, decommissioned in March 1918, sold to the Moreland Metal Company on 21 July 1922, used as timber lighter until she sunk in a heavy storm in the Salamander Bay, New South Wales, Australia in 1940. During underwater demolitions training exercises blown up although still parts remains.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1945 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 2 field guns, 3 Maxim machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pandora 1898-1913

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at the Portsmouth Dockyard, England on 3 January 1898, launched by Mary Elisabeth Napier on 17 January 1900 and sold to be broken up in July 1913.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pegasus 1896-1914

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Building ordered in 1893, laid down at Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England in May 1896, launched on 4 March 1897, commissioned on 17 January 1899, sunk by the German light cruiser SMS Königsberg when lying with boiler and engine in the Zanzibar harbour on 20 September 1914, wreck sold for 500 pond sterling to be broken up in 1955 but parts are left behind on the sea bottom.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1985 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

Displacement of 2.169 (normal)-2.780 (full load) tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 8 Reed water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pelorus 1896-1920

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at the Sheerness dockyard in 1896, commissioned on 15 December 1896 and sold to be broken up in 1920. Building costs 154.315 pond sterling.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 Normand water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Perseus 1896-1914

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at Earle’s Shipbuilding, Hull, England in May 1896, launched on 15July 1897, completed in 1901 and sold to be broken up on 26 May 1914.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 Thornycroft water-tube boilers delivering 5.000 (natural)-7.000 (forced draught) ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pioneer 1897-1912 and Australian HMAS Pioneer 1912-1931

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at the Chatham Dockyard, England on 16 December 1897, launched by Miss Andoe on 28 June 1899, completed on 23 January 1900, laid up in reserve, commissioned on 10 July 1900, decommissioned on 29 November 192, handed over to Australia on 29 November 1912, commissioned as a tender to Graden Island naval base on 1 March 1913, refitted in second part of 1913, training ship for reservists since 1 January 1914, served in German East Africa [Zanzibar] 1915-1916, decommissioned on 7 November 1916, became an accommodation vessel in 1922, transferred to the Cockatoo Island Dockyard to be scrapped in May 1923, handed over to the Commonwealth Shipping Board in 1924, being hulked sold to H.P. Stacey, Sydney, Australia in 1926 and finally scuttled off Sydney Heads, Australia on 18 February 1931. Wreck still exists.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2  February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts inverted 3-cylinder  triple expansion steam engines and 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 19,15-20 (design)  knots. Crew numbered 188-224 (originally) men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 2 field guns, 3 Maxim machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pomone 1896-1922

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down at the Sheerness Dockyard, England on 21 December 1896, launched on 25 November 1897, completed in May 1899, decommissioned in October 1904, hulked and became a training ship for engineers and stationed at the Royal Naval College at Dartmouth, England since 5 January 1910 and sold to J.H. Lee, Dover, England to be broken up on 25 October 1922.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and Blechynden 16 water-tube boilers delivering 7.000-7.340 (forced draught) ihp allowing a speed of 20 (design)-20.8(sea trials) knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser 3rd class HMS Pactolus 1896-1921

Pelorus-class

HMS Hyacinth of the Highflyer-class

Laid down by Armstrong, Elswick, England in May 1896, launched on 21 December 1896, completed in 1899 and sold to be broken up on 25 October 1921.

Of the Pelorus-class designed by chief constructor of the British Royal Navy Sir William White (2 February 1845 Plymouth, England-27 February 1913 London, England)consisting of the Pactolus, Pandora, Pegasus, Pelorus, Perseus, Pioneer, Pomone, Prometheus, Proserpine, Psyche and Pyramus, preceded by the Arrogant-class and succeeded by the Highflyer-class.

General technical class specifications. Displacement of 2.169 tons and as dimensions 91,4 (between perpendiculars)-95,6 (over all) x 11,1 x 4,9 metres or 300’-313’6” x 36’6” x 16’. Machinery consisted of 2 shafts reciprocating vertical triple expansion steam engines and 16 Blechynden water-tube boilers delivering 7.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. Crew numbered 224 men. Armour consisted of a 3,8/1.5”05,1cm/2” thick deck, 0,63cm/0.25” thick gun shields while the conning tower was protected by 7,6cm/3” thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-10,2cm/4” quick firing guns, 8x1-4,7cm/3pd quick firing guns, 3 machineguns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

Dutch East Indies steamship G.G. Loudon steaming in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper dated 15 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship G.G. Loudon towards Samarang, Surabaya, Bandermasin, Macassar and Moluccas, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Gouverneur-Generaal Loudon, call sign TDLS, homeport Batavia, horsepower 190 hp and net capacity 2.434,10 cubic metres/860,10 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

American bark Evie J. Ray cruising in the Dutch East Indiesaccording to the Dutch newspaper dated 15 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the departure of the American bark Evie J. Ray master Daw towards Probolina, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Owned by Aug. Palmer, call sign JSTR, mater A.T. Whittler (?), homeport Bath, built by D.O. Blaisdell, Bath in 1878, tonnage 678 tons and dimensions 152.8 x 32.3 x 18.7 feet. 

Italian bark Maccabeo cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper dated 15 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the departure of the Italian bark Maccabeo master Cerruto towards Cheribon, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. American register homeport Genoa, owned by P. Lavarello, master L. Cerruti, built at Varazze, Italy in 1879, tonnage 895 tons and dimensions 174.5 x 31.4 x 23.3 feet. 

Norwegian bark Valuta cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper dated 15 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the departure of the Norwegian bark Valuta master Nathanidsen towards Macassar, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. American register called her master K. Nathanidsen, call sign JWGQ, homeport Stavanger, Norway, built at Stavanger in 1878, master T.S. Falck, tonnage 940 tons and as dimensions 1792, x 35.5 x 21.6 feet. 

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Algerian flagged general cargo ship (ex-Clipper Galaxy 2001-?) Sedrata

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 March 2017

Algeria-flagged, IMO 9557795, MMSI 605086013 and call sign 7THC according tp marine traffic. According to maritime connector Clipper Galaxy, MMSI 311052300. Built by Zhoushan Shipyard, Zhousan, China in 2001. Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau and owned/managed by Clipper Project Shipping, Nassau, Bahamas. Stern mentioned Sedrata of the Cnan Nord with as homeport Alger. 

Monaco oil/chemical tanker Baltic Merchant 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 March 2017

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, Cyprus, IMO 9314806, MMSI 212227000 and call sign C4KB2. Built at Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2006. Owned and managed by Scorpio Shipmanagement, Monaco. 

British container ship (ex-Henrika Schulte 2001, P&O Nedlloyd Atacama 2001-2005, Henrika Schulte 2005-2007) Ocean Promise 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 March 2017

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport London, England, IMO 9215892, MMSI 235056954 and call sign MVLE2. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2001. Owned by Lomar Shipping, London, England and managed by BSM UK, Newcastle upon Tyne, England. Ec-Henrika Schulte renamed May 2001, P&O Nedlloyd Atacama renamed November 2005 and Henrika Schulta renamed September 2007. 

Norwegian oil/chemical tanker (ex-Clipper Sira 2006-2013) Nordic Sira 2013-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 March 2017

Norway Internatinal Register-flagged, homeport Haugesund, Norway, IMO 9346500, MMSI 257941000 and call sign LAFX6. Ex-Clipper Sira renamed June 2013. Owned by Klovnings Rederi, Haugesund, Norway and managed by Nordic Tankers Marine, Copenhagen, Denmark. Built by De Hoop Foxhol, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2006. 

Belgian pilot boat Ravelingen 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 March 2017

Belgium-flagged, MMSI 205598000 and call sign ORBP. Built in France in2010. Owned and managed by DAB Vloot (of the Belgian government). 

American heavy cruiser USS Albany (CA-123) 1944-1958 and guided missile cruiser (CG-10) 1958-1990

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 6 March 1944, launched by Elizabeth F. Pinckney on 30 June 1945, commissioned on 15 June 1946, decommissioned on 30 June 1958, reclassified as a guided missile cruiser CG-10 on 1 November 1958, converted at the Boston Naval Shipyard including replacing superstructure recommissioned on 3 November 1962, decommissioned on 1 March 1967, recommissioned on 9 November 1968, decommissioned on 2 August 1980, stricken on 30 June 1985 and sold to be broken up on 12 August 1990.

Oregon city-class consisting of the Oregon City, Albany, Rochester, Northampton, Cambridge, Bridgeport, Kansas City, Tulsa, Norfolk and Scranton, preceded by the Baltimore-class and succeeded by the Des Moines –class. Modified Baltimore-class design. The superstructure was more compact and fitted out with a single trunked funnel to be able to increase the fire range arcs of the anti aircraft armament.

Common technical class specifications. Displacement 13.260 tons (standard) and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,03 metres or 673’5”x 70’10” x 26’4”. The machinery consisted of General Electric turbines delivering 120.000 ship to make a speed of 32,4 knots possible. The crew numbered 1.142 men (included officers). Except for the 4 scout floating planes they carry with them, consisted the armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” /55 cal guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” /38 cal guns, 48-4cm/1.57” Bofors guns and 20-2cm/0.78” Oerlikon cannons.

Specifications as Albany-class guided missile cruiser. Displacement 17.500 (full load) tons and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,20 metres or 673’5” x 70’10” x 26’11”. Crew numbered 1.010-1.205 (as flagship) men. Carried no longer planes with her. Armament consisted of 2-12,7cm/5” 38cal guns, 2-Mark12 RIM-8 Talos missile launchers, 2-Mark 11 RIM-24 Tartar missile launchers, 1-Mark 16 RUR-5 ASROC launcher and 2x3 Mk32torpedo tubes. 

American heavy cruiser USS Rochester (CA-124) 1944-1974

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 29 May 1944, launched on 28 August 1945, commissioned on 20 December 1946, decommissioned on 15 August 1961, stricken on 1 October 1973 and sold Zidell Explorations, Portland, Oregon, USA to be broken up on 24 September 1974.

Oregon city-class consisting of the Oregon City, Albany, Rochester, Northampton, Cambridge, Bridgeport, Kansas City, Tulsa, Norfolk and Scranton, preceded by the Baltimore-class and succeeded by the Des Moines –class. Modified Baltimore-class design. The superstructure was more compact and fitted out with a single trunked funnel to be able to increase the fire range arcs of the anti aircraft armament.

Common technical class specifications. Displacement 13.260 tons (standard) and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,03 metres or 673’5”x 70’10” x 26’4”. The machinery consisted of General Electric turbines delivering 120.000 ship to make a speed of 32,4 knots possible. The crew numbered 1.142 men (included officers). Except for the 4 scout floating planes they carry with them, consisted the armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” /55 cal guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” /38 cal guns, 48-4cm/1.57” Bofors guns and 20-2cm/0.78” Oerlikon cannons. 

American heavy cruiser USS Northampton (CA-125) 1944-1951 and command ship (CLC-1 1951-1961 and CC-1 1961-1980) 1951-1980

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 31 August 1944, work stopped between 11 Augustus 1945-1 July 1948, launched as command ship CLC-1 by Mrs. Edmond J. Lampron on 27 January 1951, commissioned on 7 March 1953, reclassified as CC-1 on 15 April 1961, decommissioned on 8 April 1970, stricken on 1 December 1977, sold to be broken up in December 1977 which was finished by 1 March 1980.

Oregon city-class consisting of the Oregon City, Albany, Rochester, Northampton, Cambridge, Bridgeport, Kansas City, Tulsa, Norfolk and Scranton, preceded by the Baltimore-class and succeeded by the Des Moines –class. Modified Baltimore-class design. The superstructure was more compact and fitted out with a single trunked funnel to be able to increase the fire range arcs of the anti aircraft armament.

Common technical class specifications. Displacement 13.260 tons (standard) and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,03 metres or 673’5”x 70’10” x 26’4”. The machinery consisted of General Electric turbines delivering 120.000 ship to make a speed of 32,4 knots possible. The crew numbered 1.142 men (included officers). Except for the 4 scout floating planes they carry with them, consisted the armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” /55 cal guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” /38 cal guns, 48-4cm/1.57” Bofors guns and 20-2cm/0.78” Oerlikon cannons. 

American heavy cruiser USS Oregon City (CA-122) 1944-1974

Baltimore-class

Oregon City-class

Laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 8 April 1944, launched by Mrs. Raymond P. Canfield on 9 June 1945, commissioned on 16 February 1946, decommissioned on 15 December 1947, stricken on 1 November 1970, sold to the Union Minerals and Alloys Corporation, NY on 17 September 1973 and broken up in Kearn, New Jersey in 1974.

Oregon city-class consisting of the Oregon City, Albany, Rochester, Northampton, Cambridge, Bridgeport, Kansas City, Tulsa, Norfolk and Scranton, preceded by the Baltimore-class and succeeded by the Des Moines –class. Modified Baltimore-class design. The superstructure was more compact and fitted out with a single trunked funnel to be able to increase the fire range arcs of the anti aircraft armament.

Common technical class specifications. Displacement 13.260 tons (standard) and as dimensions 205,26 x 21,59 x 8,03 metres or 673’5”x 70’10” x 26’4”. The machinery consisted of General Electric turbines delivering 120.000 ship to make a speed of 32,4 knots possible. The crew numbered 1.142 men (included officers). Except for the 4 scout floating planes they carry with them, consisted the armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” /55 cal guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” /38 cal guns, 48-4cm/1.57” Bofors guns and 20-2cm/0.78” Oerlikon cannons. 

American bark Evie J. Ray underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 12 June 1889

An item dated 11th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the American bark Evie J. Ray underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Owned by Aug. Palmer, call sign JSTR, mater A.T. Whittler (?), homeport Bath, built by D.O. Blaisdell, Bath in 1878, tonnage 678 tons and dimensions 152.8 x 32.3 x 18.7 feet. 

Dutch screw steamship Soerabaia underway from the Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 June 1889

An item dated 15th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch steamship Soerabaia underway from Rotterdam, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. She arrived there on the16th coming from Rotterdam and Marseille, France, shipping agents Rotterdamsche Lloyd.

Note
1. Screw steamship, call sign PSKG, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 4.617,92 cubic metres/1.630,13 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch screw steamship Utrecht underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 June 1889

An item dated 15th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch steamship Utrecht underway from Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards Amsterdam, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship, call sign PVWG, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 2.600 tons/4.686,18 cubic metres/1.654,22 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

British bark Romanoff arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 June 1889

An item dated 15th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British bark Romanoff underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. She arrived there on the 17th, master Datty, shipping agents B. van Leeuwen&Co.(1)

Note
1, Bark, master W. Doty, call sign RCFM, tonnage 1.050 tons, dimensions 175 x 37.4 x 22 feet, built by P.&R. Young, Shelburne, N.S in 1876 and owned by A.F. Stoneman&Company. 

Norwegian ship Medbor underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 June 1889

An item dated 14th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Norwegian ship Medbor underway from Surabaya, Dutch East Indies towards New York, USA. 

British bark Romanoff underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 15 June 1889

A telegram reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British ship Romanoff loaded with petrol underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1, Bark, master W. Doty, call sign RCFM, tonnage 1.050 tons, dimensions 175 x 37.4 x 22 feet, built by P.&R. Young, Shelburne, N.S in 1876 and owned by A.F. Stoneman*Company. 

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Norwegian oil/chemical tanker Latana 2000-


Nieuwe Waterweg, Hoek van Holland, Netherlands 27 February 2016

Norway International Register-flagged, homeport Bergen, Norway, IMO 9186352, MMSI 257374000 and call sign LALS5. Built by Vard Aukra, Aukra, Norway in 2000. Owned and managed by Utkilen, Bergen, Norway.