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Tuesday, 23 August 2016

USA could not afford continuous replacing battleships within short periods according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 2 August 1929

An item dated Washington, USA 1st August reported that not as in recent times was believed that battleships were to be abolished but their service period was to be lengthened. This was to be a necessary issue at the negotiations for the eventual agreement between the major naval powers. A spokesman of the White House pointed out the gigantic costs of battleships and that despite the American wealth the cabinet would study each proposal with interests leading in reducing costs, especially of ships of 37 million US dollars each. In Washington was believed that of all naval powers just Japan would agree in reducing the budget needed for replacing battleships.

British naval losses after the battle of Doggerbank according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 28 January 1915

battle cruiser HMS Tiger

Indomtable of the Invincible-class battle cruisers

Lion-class battle cruisers

An item dated London, England 27th reported the safe return of all British cruisers and destroyers in the harbours.(1) The Lion (2) was hit below the waterline by a grenade and some of her front compartments were filled with water. She was towed homeward by the Indomitable.(3) The disabled destroyer Meteor (4) was towed by the Liberty (5). Both ships were escorted by a large number of destroyers. It was expected that the repairs would soon be finished. On board of the Lion were 17 men wounded, on the Tiger (6) 1 officer and 9 sailors killed 3 officers and 8 men wounded and on the Meteor 4 men killed and one wounded.

Notes
1. From the Battle of Dogger Bank between German and British naval forces on 24 January 1915.
2. Launched at the Devonport Dockyard, Plymouth, England on 29 September 1909, launched on 6 Augustus 1910, completed in May 1912, commissioned on 4 June 1912, laid up in reserve in March 1920, as a result of the Washington Naval Treaty stricken, paid of on 30 March 1922 and sold to be broken up for 77.000 pound sterling on 31 January 1924. Building costs 2.086.458 pound sterling. Of the Lion-class preceded by the Indefatigable-class and succeeded by the Queen Mary and consisting of the Lion and the, Princess Royal nicknamed Splendid Cats. This class was realized as a result of the German arms race and to be able to destroy the German Moltke-battle cruisers. Displacement 26.690 tons/26.270 long tons (normal load)-31.310 tons/30.820 long tons (deep load) and as dimensions 213,4 x 27,0 x 9,9 (deep load) x 1,8 (metacentric height at deep load) metres or 700’ x 88‘6.75”x 32.5’ x 6‘. The 2 paired sets Parsons direct-drive steam turbines in separate engine-rooms manufactured by Vickers and 42 Yarrow boilers (in 7 boiler rooms) supplied via 4 shafts 70.000 (design)-76.000 (trials) shp allowing a speed of 28 (design) knots. With a speed of 10 knots and a coal bunker capacity of 3.556 tons and 1.153 tons fuel oil was the range 5.610 nautical miles. Their crew numbered 1.092 men. The armour consisted of a 10,2-22,9cm/4-9” thick belt, 10,2cm/4” thick bulkheads, 6,4cm/2.5” thick decks with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 22,9c./9”, 20,3-22,9cm/8-9” and 25,4cm/10”. The original armament consisted of 4x2-34,3cm/13.5” breech loading Mk V guns, 16x1-10,2cm/4” breech loading guns and 2x1-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. In begin 1918 carrying with her 2 planes launched from platforms on top of the Q and X turrets.
3. Battle cruiser. Of the Invincible-class consisting of the Invincible, Indomitable and Inflexible. Laid down at the shipyard of Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 1 March 1906, launched on 16 March 1907, commissioned on 25 June 1908, added to the Reserve Fleet in 1919, paid off in March 1920 and sold to be broken up on 1 December 1921. Building costs 1.752.337 (with guns)-1.761.080 (without guns) pound sterling.
4. Destroyer of the M-class, launched at Thornycroft on 24 July 1914 and sold to be broken up in 1921.
5. Destroyer ex-Rosalini renamed on 30 September 1913, launched at White on 15 September 1913 and sold in 1921.
6. Battle cruiser, preceded by the HMS Queen Mary and succeeded by the Renown-class. Laid down by John Brown and Company, Clydebank, Scotland on 20 June 1912, launched on 15 December 1913, commissioned on 3 October 1914, decommissioned on 15 May 1931 and sold to be broken up in February 1932.

American president Coolidge approved selling government merchant ships according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 12 February 1929

An item dated Nauen 10th referred to tidings  from New York, USA reporting that the American president Coolidge approved the sale of 13 ships of the government merchant fleet to private companies.

Notes
1. John Calvin Coolidge (4 July 1872 Plymouth, Vermont, USA-5 January 1933 Northampton, Massachusetts, USA), president 2 August 1923-4 March 1929.

Russian battleship Slava sunk in action according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 20 October 1917

Russian battleship Slava

German König-class battleships

An item dated London, England 18th reported that during a battle in the Gulf of Riga the Russian battleship Slava sunk.(1)

Note
1. Of the Borodino-class. Building ordered on 30 January 1900, laid down at the Baltic Shipyard, Saint Petersburg, Russia on 1 November 1902, launched on 29 August 1930, commissioned in October 1905, participated not in the Russo-Japanese war due to late delivery, used as training ship for new officers after 1906, added to the Baltic Fleet after 1910, grounded in the Moon Sound Strait near the island of Muhu while she -being heavily damaged by the German SMS König- could not escape from the German naval forces and sunk by Russian destroyers on 17 October 1917, stricken from the Navy List on 29 May 1918 and broken up by Estonian inhabitants in 1935. Displacement 13.733 tons/13.516 long tons (design)-14.646/14.415 (normal ) tons and as dimensions 118,69 (waterline)-121,1 (over all) x 23,2 x 8,9 metres or 389.5-397.3 x 76.1 x 20.2 feet. The 2-4cylinder vertical triple expansion steam engines and 20 Belleville water tube boilers, all made by Baltic Works, supplied via 2 screws 15.800 ihp (design)-16.378 ihp (trials) allowing a maximum speed of 17,64 knots (trials). With the maximum coal bunker capacity at full load of 1.372 tons/1.350 long tons and a speed of 10 knots was her range 2.590 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 846 men. The original armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns with 60 rounds each gun, 6x2-15,2cn/6” guns with 180 rounds each gun, 20x1-7,5cm/3.0” guns with 300 rounds each gun, 4x1-4,7cm/1.9” Hotchkiss saluting guns and 4-38,1cm/15” torpedo tubes (1x bow, 1xstern both surfaced, 2x1 broadsides submerged) for which 12 torpedoes were taken with her. Originally was the number of 4,7cm guns much more but before completion already removed. In the First World War was her armament changed with reducing the number of 7,5cm guns to 12 and adding anti aircraft guns, in begin 1917 numbering 4-7,6cm/3” guns.

The König was a dreadnought laid down at the Kaiserliche Werf, Wilhelmshaven. Germany in October 1911, with a displacement of 28.600 tons (full load) and a main armament of 5x2-30,5/12” cm guns and 14-15cm/5.9” guns. The Slava was lost during Operation Albion in September-October 1917 when Germany invaded the West Estonian Archipelago and trying to eliminate the Russian naval forces in the Bay of Riga.

British and Americans still negotiating about naval strengths according to the Dutch newspapers De Tijd dated 14 September 1929

An item referred to tidings dated New York, USA 13th reported that the American Secretary of State Stimson (1) despite the fact that the American-British negotiations mainly were successful, there still were some minor points at issue. This statement was confirmed by tidings from Washington, USA make it clear that supporters of a big navy still continued with forcing their own way. The USA seemed to intend executing her cruiser building program.

Notes
1. Henry Lewis Stimson (21 September 1867, New York, USA)-20 October 1950 New York), Secretary of State 28 March 1929-4 March 1933.

Japanese battle cruisers Amagi and Akagi nearly completed according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 4 August 1919

Amagi-class battle cruisers

Akagi

An item referred to the Japan Chronicle which reported that the two battle cruisers built at the shipyards at Kure and Yokosuka, Japan and at the disposal of the navy the same year were to be named Amagi and Akagi and probably completed begin 1920.(1)

Note
1. The Amagi-class succeeded by the Kongo-class of which the Akagi was completed as an aircraft carrier. The Amagi was heavily damaged during the earthquake in Tokyo, Japan in September 1923 and broken up. The Atago and Takao broken up in their slipways. Displacement 41.217 (normal)-47.000 (full load) tons, dimensions 251,8 x 30,8 x 9,5 metres or 826 x 10 x 31 feet, speed 30 knots and an armament of 5x2-41cm L/45 guns, 16-14cm L/50 guns, 6-12cm/4.7” anti aircraft guns and 8-61cm/24” torpedo tubes.

Japan interested in an real decrease of navies according to the Dutch newspaper De Tijd dated 14 September 1929

An item referred to tidings dated London, England 14th reporting that the Japanese cabinet still not officially stated what her standpoint was about the results of the British-American naval disarmament discussions. Leading Japanese officers who first believed that an agreement between the USA and United Kingdom was doubtful now changed their opinion completely. The Japanese minister of navy stated a day earlier again that Japan desired a really decrease and not just a status quo of the further naval armament. If a limited naval building program was necessary would Japan not be against it.

American destroyer USS Breck (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Isherwood (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Case (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Lardner (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Putnam (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Worden (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Flusser (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Dale (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1920, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Converse (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1920, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Reid (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Monday, 22 August 2016

Belgian support jack up (ex-Vidar 2011-2016) Vole au Vent 2016-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

Germany-flagged, homeport Hamburg, Germany, IMO 9655315, MMSI 218657000 and call sign DDWP2. Laid down by Crist, Gdingen Poland with yard number NB130 on 22 December 2011, launched in 28 August 2013 and baptized on 12 December 2013. Originally owned and managed by Hochtief Solutions, Essen, Germany as the Vidar. Now property of the Belgian firm Jan de Nul since 2015. Speed 10,2 (service)-12 maximum) knots. Four legs suitable to a depth of 50 metres, with a length of 90 metres and a diameter of 4,8 metres, Horsepower 32.621hp/24.000kW. Four Schottel-propeller gondola’s. Gross tonnage 18.886 tons, net tonnage 5.665 tons, displacement 8265 ton and as dimensions 133,22 (between perpendiculars)-140,29 (over all) x 41,24 x 6,60 (maximum) x 9,50 (height sides) metres. metres. Ex-Vidar renamed 2016. Accommodation for 90 men.

Belgian river patrol vessel Liberation (ex-P 902-1954-2012) V902 2012-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

Belgium-flagged, original homeport Leopoldsburg. Displacement 27,50 tons and as dimensions 26,00 x 3,90 x 0,90 metres. Of the Liberation class river patrol vessels. Former P902 Liberartion 1954-2012. Crew numbered 5 men. Speed 19,00 knots. Decommissioned in 2012 and sold by the Royal Belgian Navy to the Royal Belgian Sea Cadet Corps in 2012. ENI 06105553. Built by Theodor Hitzler, Regensburg, Germany in 1954. Originally part of the Belgian Rhine flotilla 1954-1960 which patrolled on the Rhine between the entrance and Cöln, Germany with as homeport Niehl.

British tug Swiftstone 1952-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

Built by Richard Dunstone Limited, Thorne, England with yard number T.847 in 1952 for account of Cort Lighterage Limited at London, England. ON 184745. Since 199... owned by the The Swiftstone Trust with as homeport the Trinity Buoy Wharf, Tower Hamlets, London, England. In 2001 begun the restoration. Sister ships Relentless, Relay, Recruit and Repulse. Gross tonnage 91 tons and as dimensions 24,38 metres or 80.0 x 19.6 x 9.6 feet. One screw and fitted out with a 670bhp Crossley diesel engine.

Dutch ship breaking company bought former German battleship Nassau for breaking her up according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 3 January 1923

German Nassau-class battleships

An item reported that the Dutch N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen te Hendrik Ido Ambacht, Netherlands bought the 18.900 ton former German battleship Nassau (built in 1900) to break her up.(1) After the First World War was she awarded to Japan, but Japan sold her British ship-breakers to be broken up. She was partially broken up by them but then resold. The Dutch ocean going tugs Zwarte Zee and Lauwerzee departed in the afternoon of 31 December 1922 from the Tyne towing the Nassau. On the 2nd at 12.00 o’clock were they on the position 53.50 north and 1.56 east.

Note
1. Laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft, Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 22 July 1907, launched on 7 March 1908, commissioned on 1 October 1909, handed over to Japan in April 1920, sold to a British wrecking firm in June 1920 and finally broken up at Dordrecht, Netherlands in 1920. Of the Nassau-class consisting of the Nassau. Posen, Rheinland and Westfalen. They were built to replace the Sachsen-class under the temporarily names Ersatz Bayern, Ersatz Sachsen, Ersatz Württemberg and Ersatz Baden.

Dutch tug Zwarte Zee towed British depot ship Pembroke to the ship breakers according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 26 February 1923

An item reported the departure of the Dutch tug Zwarte Zee on the 24th from Chatham, England and now arrived at Granton while towing the former battleship Egremont (1) which was to be broken up.

Note
1. Laid down as the British armoured frigate at the Chatham Dockyard, England on 1 August 1861, launched on 23 December 1863, completed on 26 November 1864, depot ship since 1901, renamed Hibernia in 1902, in March 1904 Egmont, on 18 June 1916 Egremont, on 6 June 1919 Pembroke and sold to the Granton Shipbreaking Company to be broken up on 26 January 1923.

Italian squadron still lying at Corfu, Greece according to the Dutch newspaper De Zuid-Willemsvaart dated 21 September 1923

An item reported that the Italian forces begin 4 days age with preparing their retreat from the Greek island Corfu as fast as when they 14 days earlier occupied the island. At that moment was an Italian squadron consisting of a battleship, a cruiser, 12 torpedo boats and 4 auxiliary cruisers lying in the harbour.

Dutch tugs Zwarte Zee and Poolzee towed British battleship HMS Collingwood to ship breakers at Newport, England according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 10 March 1923

St. Vincent-class battleships

An item dated Rotterdam, Netherlands 10th reported that the Dutch ocean going tugs Zwarte Zee and Poolzee of L. Smit&Co, towed the former British 23.4000ton battleship Collingwood from Portsmouth, England towards Newport, England to be broken up under the Washington Naval Treaty.

Notes
1. Of the St. Vincent-class consisting of the St. Vincent, Vanguard and Collingwood, preceded by the Bellerophon-class and succeeded by the Neptune-class. Laid down at the navy yard at Devonport, England on 3 February 1908, launched on 7 November 1908, commissioned on 19 March 1910, tender of the HMS Vivid and used as gunnery and wireless telegraphy training ships since 1 October 1919, in reserve since August 1920, boys training ship since 22 September 1921, paid off on 31 March 1922 and sold to John Casmore Limited to be broken up on 12 December 1922 and arrived for this purpose at Newport, England on 3 March 1923. Building costs included armament 1.680.888 pound sterling.
2. Result of the Washington Naval Conference between November 1921-February 1922 signed by USA, England, Japan, Italy and France to limit the building of battleships, battle cruisers and aircraft carriers and to limit the possession of such capital ships by stopping completion of breaking up already existing.

Dutch tugs Zwarte Zee and Witte Zee towed British battleship HMS Superb to ship breakers at Dover, England according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 9 April 1923

Bellerophon-class battleships

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tugs Zwarte Zee and Witte Zee left on the 7th Portsmouth, England towards Dover, England towing the former battleship Superb towards the ship breakers to be broken up under the Washington Naval Treaty. The Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 10th reported the arrival the same day.

Notes
1. Building ordered on 26 December 1906. Building costs 1.744.287 pond sterling. Laid down at Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick, England with yard number 800 on 6 February 1907, launched on 7 November 1907, commissioned on 29 May 1909, completed 19 June 1909, reserve at Sheerness, England on 26 April 1919, decommissioned on 26 March 1920, gunnery target in May 1922, attack for aircraft in 1918 and sold to Stanlee Shipbreaking Company, Dover, England be broken up in December 1922. Of the Bellerophon-class dreadnoughts consisting of the Bellerophon, Superb and Temeraire preceded by the Dreadnought and succeeded by the St. Vincent-class.
2. Result of the Washington Naval Conference between November 1921-February 1922 signed by USA, England, Japan, Italy and France to limit the building of battleships, battle cruisers and aircraft carriers and to limit the possession of such capital ships by stopping completion of breaking up already existing.

Sunday, 21 August 2016

American destroyer USS Bancroft (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Welles (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Aulick (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Ingram Osmond (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Rodgers (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS McCalla (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Gillis (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Turner (1919) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Delphy (1918) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS McDermut (1918) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS Laub (1918) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1918, completed in 1918, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American destroyer USS McLanahan (1918) in 1923

Launched at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum Victory Yard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 1.215 tons, 27.000 hp horsepower, all geared turbine oil fuelled machinery and an armament of 4-4” guns, 1-14pd anti aircraft gun and 4x3-21” torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British tug Touchstone 1962-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

England-flagged, MMSI 235000107 and call sign MHKA. Built by Cooks of James W.Wivenhoe in 1962 for account of the Cory Tank Lighterage Company. Welded steel construction. Dimensions 21,12 (over all) x 5,68 x 4,00 (air draft) x 2,28 (depth) metres or 69.29 x 18.64 x 13.12 x 7.48 feet and a gross tonnage of 68,00 tons. A so-called Thames Lighterage Tug active on the Thames and Medway between 1962-1999 towing petrol lighters between Thameshaven and Aylesford and later assigned t the River Thames household rubbish trade between London and the Cory‘s properties on the Mucking Flats marshes followed in the 1990s when she was stationed at Gravesend. Since 1999 a so-called working preserved craft.

Belgian pilot vessel Westerschelde 2011-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

Belgium-flagged, IMO 9569009, MMSI 205593000 and call sign ORPV. Built in 2011.

Dutch tug (Marianne 1913-1916, Gebr. Cohrs II 1916-1918, Jason 1918-1958, Johann 1958-2005) Alphecca 2005-


Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

ENI no. 02212782, MMSI 244740158 and callsign PCOAT. Launched at the shipyard of G&H Bodewes, Martenshoek with yard number 554 on Saturday afternoon 4 October 1913. The building as a steam tug started for their own account but she was fold for ƒ 52.500 to C.L. Hehrkens, Hamburg Germany and named Marianne with a KLUG 220 ihp steam engine. The boiler was placed on 29 October and on Thursday afternoon 27 November left she the shipyard. Dimensions 23,0 x 5,20 x 3,00 metres. Nowadays fitted out with a Deutz 500hp engine. As the Gebr. Cohrs II 1916 owned by Gebrs. Cohrs, Danzig, Germany, 1917 Bugsier GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, renamed Jason 1918, 1921 owned by Habermann&Guckes AG, Kiel, Germany, 1938 Joh. Matthies, Hamburg, Germany, 1950 Ewald Ottens, Cuxhaven, Germany, 1958 as the Johann of H. Gerlach, Hamburg and rebuilt a year later as motor tug at Hamburg, 1967 of Vereinigte Schlepp Reedereien GmbH, Hamburg, 2005 K. Meijer, Westerbroek, Netherlands, 2005 as the Alphannec of J.J. Pols&D. van der Horst, Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands and since 2006 of the Stichting tot behoud v/d mslb Alphecca, Hellevoetsluis.

Belgian trawler Amandine (O.129) 1960-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

Nowadays museum ship was she the last Iceland trawler fitted out from Oostende, Belgium. Laid down at Panesi, Oostende, Belgium on 16 November 1960, commissioned on 17 March 1962 and decommissioned on 3 April 1995.

Belgian search and rescue vessel R6-Orka 2014-

Inner harbour of Oostende, Belgium 28 May 2016

Belgium-flagged, homeport Oostende, Belgium. MMSI 205115000 and call sign ORBZ. Built at Lorient, France in 2014.

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Preliminary design for an American torpedo battleship dated 15 August 1912


The drawing was made by the US Bureau of Construction&Repair which in 1911 suggested that a ship of this kind should be built under the Fiscal Year 1913 Program. The idea of a battleships with as main armament torpedo tubes and just a few heavy guns was in fact not accepted and never realized.

Displacement 35.500 tons and as dimensions 900 (waterline) x 91 (outside of plating) x 31 (mean) feet. Longitudinal coefficient o.561. The turbine machinery and 31 boilers supplied 104.000 shp allowing a speed of 30 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of 16 submerged tubes and 1x4-14” breech loading guns. Allowance was made in weights for 40-3” quick firing guns. The armour consisted of a main side belt with an extreme width of 18’6, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 9-14”, barbettes 4,5 (light part)-13” (heavy part), turret 5 (roof)-9 (rear)-9-10 (sides)-18” (port), conning tower 6 (tube light)-16” (tube heavy and proper), conning tower 6 (light)-16 (heavy), uptake protection none, protective deck total 120# and splinter deck total thickness 60#.

Displacement 35.500 tons: hull complete 14.600 tons, hull fittings 1.700 tons, protection 7.144 tons, steam engineering 6.600 tons, res. Feed 2/3 supply 693 tons, battery 870 tons, ammunition&2/3 ordnance stores 638 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores 520 tons, outfit&2/3 stores 735 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.740 tons and 190 tons margin/

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-022. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy.

British squadron returning to Malta from the Dardanelles according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 19 October 1922

King George V-class

An item dated Malta 18th reported that the British battleship Ajax (1), the small cruiser Concord (2) and two destroyers left the evening before Tsjansk (Dardanelles) returning to Malta.(3) Het Vaderland dated 197h supplied the names of the destroyers namely Sikh (4), Sirdar (5)and Stuart.(6)

Notes
1. Part of the King George V-class consisting of the King George V (ex-Royal George), Audacious, Centurion and Ajax, preceded by the Orion-class and succeeded by the Iron Duke-class. Ordered under the 1910 construction program. Laid down by Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Greenock, Scotland on 27 February 1911, launched on 21 March 1912, completed on 31 October 1913, decommissioned in 1924, part of the reserve at Devonport and sold to the Alloa Shipbreaking Company be broken up om 10 December 1926 which started at Rosyth, Scotland from 14 December 1926 on. Main armament 5x2-34,3cm/13.5” guns.
2. Of the C-class light cruisers, laid down tr Vickers Limited on 1 February 1915, launched on 1 April 1916, completed and commissioned in December 1916 and in August 1935 sold to be broken up. Main armament 5-15,2cm/6” guns.
3. At that moment was the Turkish War of Independence between 19 May 1919-11 October 1922 although there was an armistice still unfinished. Not earlier as on 24 July 1923 was with the Treaty of Lausanne peace. Their opponents of the Ottoman Sultanate were Armenia, Greece, England, Italy and France. The locations of the acts were was Anatolia, North Mesopotamia and Thrace.
4. Destroyer of the S-class. Launched at Fairfield on 7 May 1918 and sold on 26 July 1927.
5. Destroyer of the S-class. Launched at Fairfield on 6 July 1918 and sold on 4 May 1934.
6. Destroyer leader, launched at Hawthorn Leslie on 22 August 1918 and sold oin February 1947.

Preliminary design for the American Pennsylvania-class battleships (BB38&39) dated 28 February 1912

Nevada-class

Preliminary-design Pennsylvania-class


Pennsylvania-class

USS Mew Mexico before the Second World War

Battleships to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913. Based on a design of the preceding Nevada-class battleships and presented to the Navy’s General Board on 2 March 1911.(1)

Dimensions 610 (water line) x 95,2 (outside plating) x 29,6 (mean) feet and a displacement of 31.300 tons. Block coefficient 0,640, longitudinal 0,652, midship section coefficient 0,982. Armament 4x3-14” guns, 22-5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The reciprocating machinery and 16 boilers supplied 27.1000 ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of a main side belt with as extreme width 17’.4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 13½”, 13½”-8”, barbettes 4½” (light part)-13” (heavy part), turrets 5” (roof)-9” rear)-9/10” (sides)-18” (port), conning tower proper 16” just like the fire control, conning tower tube 6” (light)-16” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 120#(100# S.T.S. over 20# middle), splinter deck total thickness 80#slopes and 60# flats. Percentage waterline protection 0.836. Normal displacement of 31.300 tons: hull complete 12.946 tons, hull fittings 1.278 tons, protection 9.094 tons, steam engineering 2.090 tons, res. Feed 2/3 supply 180 tons, battery 1.550 tons, ammunition &2/3 ordinance stores 1.335 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores ad outfit&2/3 stores 1.025 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.445 tons and 357 tons margin.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-11. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. Scheme ‘I”.

Note
1. Pennsylvania-class consisted of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. Figures for the USS Pennsylvania.Displacement 28.626 (standard)-32.429 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 182,9-185,3 x 29,72 (waterline x 9,9 (deep load) metres or 600-608 x 97.6 x 29.3 feet. The 4 Curtiss ungeared and Westhinghouse geared steam turbines and 12 Babcock&Wilcox (later 1 Bureau Express and 4 White-Forster boilers) water tube boilers supplied 31.500 shp via 4 screws allowing a speed of 21,38 knots and a range of 6.070 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbered 915-1.358 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.8” thick belt, 3,8-7,6cm/1.5-3” thick decks. 20,3-33cm/8-13” thick bulkheads and the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by 20,3-33cm/8-13”, 12,7-45,7cm/5-18” and 40m6cm/16”. The armament consisted of 4x3-35,6cm/14” /45 guns, 22012,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” /50 anti aircraft guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.

Preliminary design for the American Pennsylvania-class battleships (BB38&39) dated 16 March 1912

Nevada-class

Preliminary-design Pennsylvania-class


Pennsylvania-class

USS Mew Mexico before the Second World War

Battleships to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913. Based on a design of the preceding Nevada-class battleships but which was however never presented to the Navy’s General Board. In contrary to other preliminary designs. The distance between the forward and after pairs of gun turrets was to be made as small as possible. In contrary to the other preliminary designs for this class was chosen for twin gun turrets instead of triple gun turrets. The result was that with the same number of gun turrets the numbers of main guns was decreased. To compensate this loss were 15” guns to be mounted.(1)

Dimensions 610 (water line) x 95,9 (outside plating) x 28,6 (mean) feet and a displacement of 30.800 tons. Block coefficient 0,646, longitudinal 0,658, midship section coefficient 0,982. Armament 4x2-14” guns, 22-5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The reciprocating machinery and 16 boilers supplied 30.500 ihp allowing a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of a main side belt with as extreme width 17’.4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 13½”, 13½”-9”, barbettes 4½” (light part)-13” (heavy part), turrets 5” (roof)-9” rear)-9/10” (sides)-18” (port), conning tower proper 16” just like the fire control, conning tower tube 6” (light)-16” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 120#(100# S.T.S. over 20# middle), splinter deck total thickness 80#slopes and 60# flats. Percentage waterline protection 0.833. Normal displacement of 30.800 tons: hull complete 13.030 tons, hull fittings 1.280 tons, protection 8.560 tons, steam engineering 2.322tons, Res. feed 2/3 supply 202 tons, battery 1.280 tons, ammunition &2/3 ordinance stores 1.110 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores ad outfit&2/3 stores 1.025 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.444 tons and 546 tons margin.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-017. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. Scheme ‘M”.

Note
1. Pennsylvania-class consisted of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. Figures for the USS Pennsylvania.Displacement 28.626 (standard)-32.429 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 182,9-185,3 x 29,72 (waterline x 9,9 (deep load) metres or 600-608 x 97.6 x 29.3 feet. The 4 Curtiss ungeared and Westhinghouse geared steam turbines and 12 Babcock&Wilcox (later 1 Bureau Express and 4 White-Forster boilers) water tube boilers supplied 31.500 shp via 4 screws allowing a speed of 21,38 knots and a range of 6.070 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbered 915-1.358 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.8” thick belt, 3,8-7,6cm/1.5-3” thick decks. 20,3-33cm/8-13” thick bulkheads and the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by 20,3-33cm/8-13”, 12,7-45,7cm/5-18” and 40m6cm/16”. The armament consisted of 4x3-35,6cm/14” /45 guns, 22012,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” /50 anti aircraft guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.

Preliminary design for the American Pennsylvania-class battleships (BB38&39) dated 16 March 1912

Nevada-class

Preliminary-design Pennsylvania-class


Pennsylvania-class

USS Mew Mexico before the Second World War

Battleships to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913. Based on a design of the preceding Nevada-class battleships but which was however never presented to the Navy’s General Board. In contrary to other preliminary designs. The distance between the forward and after pairs of gun turrets was to be made as small as possible. In contrary to the other preliminary designs for this class was chosen for twin gun turrets instead of triple gun turrets. The result was that with the same number of gun turrets the numbers of main guns was decreased. To compensate this loss were 15” guns to be mounted.(1)

Dimensions 605 (water line) x 95,9 (outside plating) x 28,5 (mean) feet and a displacement of 31.000 tons. Block coefficient 0,655, longitudinal 0,667, midship section coefficient 0,982. Armament 4x2-14” guns, 22-5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The reciprocating machinery and 16 boilers supplied 28.300 ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of a main side belt with as extreme width 17’.4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 15”, 15”-9”, barbettes 4½” (light part)-14” (heavy part), turrets 5” (roof)-9” rear)-9/10” (sides)-18” (port), conning tower proper 16” just like the fire control, conning tower tube 6” (light)-16” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 120#(100# S.T.S. over 20# middle), splinter deck total thickness 80#slopes and 60# flats. Percentage waterline protection 0.838. Normal displacement of 31.000 tons: hull complete 12.960 tons, hull fittings 1.263 tons, protection 9.100 tons, steam engineering 2.167 tons, Res. feed 2/3 supply 188 tons, battery 1.280 tons, ammunition &2/3 ordinance stores 1.110 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores ad outfit&2/3 stores 1.025 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.442 tons and 465 tons margin.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-016. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. Scheme ‘L”.

Note
1. Pennsylvania-class consisted of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. Figures for the USS Pennsylvania.Displacement 28.626 (standard)-32.429 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 182,9-185,3 x 29,72 (waterline x 9,9 (deep load) metres or 600-608 x 97.6 x 29.3 feet. The 4 Curtiss ungeared and Westhinghouse geared steam turbines and 12 Babcock&Wilcox (later 1 Bureau Express and 4 White-Forster boilers) water tube boilers supplied 31.500 shp via 4 screws allowing a speed of 21,38 knots and a range of 6.070 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbered 915-1.358 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.8” thick belt, 3,8-7,6cm/1.5-3” thick decks. 20,3-33cm/8-13” thick bulkheads and the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by 20,3-33cm/8-13”, 12,7-45,7cm/5-18” and 40m6cm/16”. The armament consisted of 4x3-35,6cm/14” /45 guns, 22012,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” /50 anti aircraft guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.

Preliminary design for the American Pennsylvania-class battleships (BB38&39) dated 1 March 1912

Nevada-class

Preliminary-design Pennsylvania-class


Pennsylvania-class

USS Mew Mexico before the Second World War

Battleships to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913. Based on a design of the preceding Nevada-class battleships and presented to the Navy’s General Board on 2 March 1911. This preliminary was drawn to give an impression if the design dated 14 February 1912 was altered with a lower maximum speed and replacing the turbine machinery by reciprocating machinery and a smaller displacement. The distance between the forward and after pairs of gun turrets was to be made as small as possible.(1)

Dimensions 620 (water line) x 92,5 (outside plating) x 28,5 (mean) feet and a displacement of 30.800 tons. Block coefficient 0,660, longitudinal 0,672, midship section coefficient 0,983. Armament 4x3-14” guns, 22-5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The reciprocating machinery and 16 boilers supplied 27.400 ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of a main side belt with as extreme width 17’.4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 13½”, 13½”-8”, barbettes 4½” (light part)-13” (heavy part), turrets 5” (roof)-9” rear)-9/10” (sides)-18” (port), conning tower proper 16” just like the fire control, conning tower tube 6” (light)-16” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 120#(100# S.T.S. over 20# middle), splinter deck total thickness 80#slopes and 60# flats. Percentage waterline protection 0.838. Normal displacement of 30.800 tons: hull complete 13.017 tons, hull fittings 1.260 tons, protection 8.550 tons, steam engineering 2.100 tons, Res. feed 2/3 supply 183 tons, battery 1.550 tons, ammunition &2/3 ordinance stores 1.335 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores ad outfit&2/3 stores 1.025 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.435 tons and 345 tons margin.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-013. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. Scheme ‘K”.

Note
1. Pennsylvania-class consisted of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. Figures for the USS Pennsylvania.Displacement 28.626 (standard)-32.429 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 182,9-185,3 x 29,72 (waterline x 9,9 (deep load) metres or 600-608 x 97.6 x 29.3 feet. The 4 Curtiss ungeared and Westhinghouse geared steam turbines and 12 Babcock&Wilcox (later 1 Bureau Express and 4 White-Forster boilers) water tube boilers supplied 31.500 shp via 4 screws allowing a speed of 21,38 knots and a range of 6.070 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbered 915-1.358 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.8” thick belt, 3,8-7,6cm/1.5-3” thick decks. 20,3-33cm/8-13” thick bulkheads and the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by 20,3-33cm/8-13”, 12,7-45,7cm/5-18” and 40m6cm/16”. The armament consisted of 4x3-35,6cm/14” /45 guns, 22012,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” /50 anti aircraft guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.

Preliminary design for the American Pennsylvania-class battleships (BB38&39) dated 28 February 1912

Nevada-class

Preliminary-design Pennsylvania-class


Pennsylvania-class

USS Mew Mexico before the Second World War

Battleships to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913. Based on a design of the preceding Nevada-class battleships and presented to the Navy’s General Board on 2 March 1911. The distance between the forward and after pairs of gun turrets was to be made as small as possible.(1)

Dimensions 595 (water line) x 96 (outside plating) x 29,6 (mean) feet and a displacement of 31.100 tons. Block coefficient 0,625, longitudinal 0,637, midship section coefficient 0,982. Armament 4x3-14” guns, 22-5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The reciprocating machinery and 16 boilers supplied 26.000 ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of a main side belt with as extreme width 17’.4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 13½”, 13½”-8”, barbettes 4½” (light part)-13” (heavy part), turrets 5” (roof)-9” rear)-9/10” (sides)-18” (port), conning tower proper 16” just like the fire control, conning tower tube 6” (light)-16” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 120#(100# S.T.S. over 20# middle), splinter deck total thickness 80#slopes and 60# flats. Percentage waterline protection 0.847. Normal displacement of 31.300 tons: hull complete 12.640 tons, hull fittings 1.227 tons, protection 8.430 tons, steam engineering 1.990 tons, Res. feed 2/3 supply 173 tons, battery 1.550 tons, ammunition &2/3 ordinance stores 1.335 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores ad outfit&2/3 stores 1.025 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.395 tons and 335 tons margin.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-012. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. Scheme ‘J”.

Note
1. Pennsylvania-class consisted of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. Figures for the USS Pennsylvania.Displacement 28.626 (standard)-32.429 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 182,9-185,3 x 29,72 (waterline x 9,9 (deep load) metres or 600-608 x 97.6 x 29.3 feet. The 4 Curtiss ungeared and Westhinghouse geared steam turbines and 12 Babcock&Wilcox (later 1 Bureau Express and 4 White-Forster boilers) water tube boilers supplied 31.500 shp via 4 screws allowing a speed of 21,38 knots and a range of 6.070 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbered 915-1.358 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.8” thick belt, 3,8-7,6cm/1.5-3” thick decks. 20,3-33cm/8-13” thick bulkheads and the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by 20,3-33cm/8-13”, 12,7-45,7cm/5-18” and 40m6cm/16”. The armament consisted of 4x3-35,6cm/14” /45 guns, 22012,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” /50 anti aircraft guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.

Preliminary design for the American Pennsylvania-class battleships (BB38&39) dated 14 February 1912

Nevada-class

Preliminary-design Pennsylvania-class


Pennsylvania-class

USS Mew Mexico before the Second World War

Battleships to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913. Based on a design of the preceding Nevada-class battleships and which was modified as specified by the Navy’s General Board on 9 June 1911.(1)

Dimensions 630 (water line) x 93,0 (outside plating) x 29,8 (mean) feet and a displacement of 31.300 tons. Block coefficient 0,656, longitudinal 0,668, midship section coefficient 0,982. Armament 4x3-14” guns, 22-5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The turbine machinery and 16 boilers supplied 30.5000 ihp allowing a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of a main side belt with as extreme width 17’.4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 13½”, 13½”-8”, barbettes 4½” (light part)-13” (heavy part), turrets 5” (roof)-9” rear)-9/10” (sides)-18” (port), conning tower proper 16” just like the fire control, conning tower tube 6” (light)-16” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 120#(100# S.T.S. over 20# middle), splinter deck total thickness 80#slopes and 60# flats. Percentage waterline protection 0.819. Normal displacement of 31.300 tons: hull complete 13.190 tons, hull fittings 1.300 tons, protection 8.575 tons, steam engineering 2.335 tons, res. Feed 2/3 supply 203 tons, battery 1.550 tons, ammunition &2/3 ordinance stores 1.335 tons, equipment&2/3 equipment stores ad outfit&2/3 stores 1.025 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.463 tons and 324 tons margin.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-10. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. Schema ‘G’.

Note
1. Pennsylvania-class consisted of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. Figures for the USS Pennsylvania. Displacement 28.626 (standard)-32.429 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 182,9-185,3 x 29,72 (waterline x 9,9 (deep load) metres or 600-608 x 97.6 x 29.3 feet. The 4 Curtiss ungeared and Westhinghouse geared steam turbines and 12 Babcock&Wilcox (later 1 Bureau Express and 4 White-Forster boilers) water tube boilers supplied 31.500 shp via 4 screws allowing a speed of 21,38 knots and a range of 6.070 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbered 915-1.358 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.8” thick belt, 3,8-7,6cm/1.5-3” thick decks. 20,3-33cm/8-13” thick bulkheads and the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by 20,3-33cm/8-13”, 12,7-45,7cm/5-18” and 40m6cm/16”. The armament consisted of 4x3-35,6cm/14” /45 guns, 22012,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” /50 anti aircraft guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.

British battleship HMS Malaya underway from India towards Malacca according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 12 January 1921

Queen Elizabeth-class

An item dated Calcutta, India 11th reported that at Madras the duke of Connaught (1) was disembarked. The British battleship HMS Malaya (2) continued her voyage towards Malacca the same morning.

Notes
1. Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (1 May 1850 Buckingham Palace, London, England)-16 January 1942 Bagshot Park, Surrey, England), governor general of Canada 13 October 1911-11 November 1916)
2. Of the Queen-Elizabeth-class consisting of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 01. Laid down at Armstrong Whitworth and Company, High Walker, Tyneside, England on 20 October 1913, launched on 18 March 1915, commissioned on 1 February 1916, in reserve since end of 1943, used as target in Loch Striven 15/17 May 1944, decommissioned to be used if needed as bombardment battleship, decommissioned becoming accommodation ship for torpedo school  end 1944 and sold to Metal Industries on 20 February 1948 and broken up at Faslane, Scotland in 1948. Building costs 2.045.709 pond sterling.

Friday, 19 August 2016

American heavy cruiser Salt Lake City (CA-25) 1927-1948


Of the Pensacola-class consisted of the Pensacola and the Salt Lake City. Preceded by the St. Louis-class and succeeded by the Northampton-class. Classified as light cruisers although since July 1931 as heavy cruisers while armed with 8” guns. Ordered on 18 December 1924, contract signed on 9 July 1926, supplementary contract signed on 16 April 1927, laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 9 June 1927, launched on 23 January 1929, sponsored by Miss Helen Budge, commissioned on 11 December 1929,  participated in the nuclear tests at Bikini (Operation Crossroads) on 1 and 25 July 1046, scuttled off the Southern Californian coast on 25 May 1948 and stricken on 18 June 1948. Hull pennants CL-25 and since 1 July 1931 CA-25. Call sign NISK.

Displacement 9.100 (standard)-11.512 (full load) tons and as dimensions 178,5 x 19,8 x 5,9 metres or 585.5 x 65.0 x 19.5 feet. The steam turbines and 8 boilers supplied via 4 screws 107.000 hp allowing a speed of 32,5 knots. Crew numbered 663 men. The armour consisted of a 6,4-10,2cm/2.5-4” thick belt, 2,5-4,4cm/1-1.75” thick decks with gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 1,9-6,4cm/0.75-2.5”, 19,cm/0.75” and 3,2cm/1.25”. The original armament consisted of 4 planes, 2x2&2x3-20/cm8”/55 cal guns, 8x1-12,7cm/5” /25 guns, 2-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd saluting guns and 2x3-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. The armament in 1942 was 2x2&2x3-20/cm8”/55 cal guns, 4x1-12,7cm/5” /25 anti aircraft guns, 2-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd saluting guns , 4-2,79cm/1.1” /75 anti aircraft guns and 8x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon cannons. The armament in 1945 was 2x2&2x3-20/cm8”/55 cal guns, 4x1-12,7cm/5” /25 anti aircraft guns, 2-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd saluting guns, 6-quad 4cm/1.6” Bofors guns and 19x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon cannons.

American heavy cruiser USS Pensacola (CA-24) 1926-1948


Of the Pensacola-class consisted of the Pensacola and the Salt Lake City. Preceded by the St. Louis-class and succeeded by the Northampton-class. Classified as light cruisers although since July 1931 as heavy cruisers while armed with 8” guns. Ordered on 18 December 1924, awarded on 7 March 1925 with a supplementary contract signed on 9 July 1926, laid down at the New York Navy Yard, USA on 27 October 1926, launched on 25 April 1929, sponsored by Mrs. Joseph L. Seligman, completed on 9 July 1929, commissioned on 6 February 1930, survived the nuclear tests at Bikini (Operation Crossroads) on 1 and 25 July 1946, decommissioned on 26 August 1946 and scuttled off the Washington coast on 10 November 1948. Pennants CL-24 and since 1 July 1931 CA-24. Call sign NIJS.

Displacement 9.100 (standard)-11.512 (full load) tons and as dimensions 178,5 x 19,8 x 5,9 metres or 585.5 x 65.0 x 19.5 feet. The steam turbines and 8 boilers supplied via 4 screws 107.000 hp allowing a speed of 32,5 knots. Crew numbered 1.200 men. The original armament consisted of 4 planes, 2x2&2x3-20/cm8”/55 cal guns, 8x1-12,7cm/5” /25 guns, 2-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd saluting guns and 2x3-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. The armament in 1942 was 2x2&2x3-20/cm8”/55 cal guns, 4x1-12,7cm/5” /25 anti aircraft guns, 2-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd saluting guns , 4-2,79cm/1.1” /75 anti aircraft guns and 8x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon cannons. The armament in 1945 was 2x2&2x3-20/cm8”/55 cal guns, 4x1-12,7cm/5” /25 anti aircraft guns, 2-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd saluting guns, 7-quad 4cm/1.6” Bofors guns and 9x2-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon cannons. The armour consisted of a 6,4-10,2cm/2.5-4” thick belt, 2,5-4,4cm/1-1.75” thick decks with gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 1,9-6,4cm/0.75-2.5”, 19,cm/0.75” and 3,2cm/1.25”.

French cruiser Jeanne d’Arc 1928-1964


Laid down at Penhoët, St. Naziare, France in September 1928, launched in 1930, baptized on 14 February 1930, commissioned in October 1931, decommissioned in 1964 and finally broken up. Designed by naval engineer Antoine to be uses as training ship and as competitive warship. Building approved un 1927 Program. Homeport Toulon, France. Pennant C 605. Displacement 6.500 tons and as dimensions 170 x 17,70 x 6,50 metres or 560 x 58.1 x 21.3 feet/ The turbines and boilers supplied 32.500 hp allowing a speed of 25 (design)-27,8 (trials) knots and with a speed of 14,5 knots a range of 5.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of 2 CAMS Reconnaissance planes, 4x2-15,5cm/6.1” guns (2x bo2, 2xaft), 4-7,5cm/3” guns, 11-3,7cm/1.5” anti aircraft guns , 12-1,3cm/0.51 anti aircraft machineguns and 2 torpedo tubes. Her crew numbered 552 men excluded 156 midshipmen.

Japanese cadet training ship JDS Kashima (TV-3508) 1993-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2016

Flagship of the JMSDF Training Fleet. Building under Financial Year Budget 1991 and later 1992 approved, ordered in 1992, laid down by the Hitachi Zosen Corporation on 20 April 1993, launched on 23 February 1994 and commissioned on 25 January 1995. Displacement 4.050 (standard) tons and as dimensions 143 x 18 x 4,6 metres or 469 x 59 x 15 feet. Speed 25 knots. Fitted out with 2-26.150 shp  Rolls-Royce Spey SM1C gad turbines an d2 Mitsubushi S16U-MTK diesels. Crew numbers 370 men. The armament consists of 1-7,6cm Otobreda gun, 2x3 torpedo tubes and 4 saluting guns. Homeport Kure, Japan. MMSI 431999529.