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Friday, 30 September 2016

American crude oil tanker Gener8 Georg T 2007-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 September 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9336971, MMSI 538002935 and call sign V7NA6. Built by JMU TSU Shipyard, Tsu, Japan in 2007. Owned by General Maritime Management, New York, USA and managed by General Maritime Management Portugal, Lisbon, Portugal.

German container ship (ex-Helle Ritscher 2006, DAL East London 2006-2009, Helle Ritscher 2009-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 September 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9333371, MMSI 636091030 and call sign A8156. Ex-Hell Ritscher renamed 22 March 2006 and DAL East London renamed October 2009. Owned and managed by Transeste Schiffahrt, Jork, Germany. Built by Daewoo Mangalia Heavy Industries, Mangalia, Romania in 2006.

Italian oil/chemical tanker (ex-North Castle 2009-2010) Nike 2010-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 September 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9431032, MMSI 249803000 and call sign 9HA2013. Ex-North Castle renamed February 2010. Owned and managed by K. Ships, Genova, Italy. Built by Gisan Tuzla Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey.

Russian State Council approved budget for building battleships Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 23 June 1908


An item dated St. Petersburg, Russia 22nd reported that the financial commission of the Russian State Council again approved a budget of 11 million rubles needed for the building of new battleships.

Note
1. The 24.900 tons Gangut-class battleships built at Russian shipyards between 1909-1914, consisting of the Gangut, Petropavlovsk, Sevastopol and Poltava. The international design contest was win by the German ship Blohm un Voss, Hamburg, Germany.

German budget increased for building more ships according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra post dated 24 November 1908

An item reported that the German naval budget was increased with 30 million guilders needed for building 3 new battleships, 2 small cruisers and a torpedo flotilla including 6 million for building submarines. The Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 23th supplied somehow different details. An item mentioned that Von Bülow asked the parliament for an extra budget of 3 million pond sterling for building 3 battleships, a large cruiser, 2 small cruisers and a torpedo boat flotilla included a halve million for building submarines.

Italy selling battleships to Argentina according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 8 April 1908


Italian Regina-Elena class battleships

An item referred to the Associated Press at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil which reported that Italy was willing to sell for 20 million US dollars the battleships Regina Elena (1), Napoli (2) and Roma (3) to Argentina. Argentina was interested in buying the ships due to the intentions of the Brazilian cabinet to increase the Brazilian navy. The Dutch newspaper doubted if this news was reliable.

Notes
1. Laid down at the La Spezia Naval shipyard on 27 March 1901, launched on 19 June 1904, commissioned on 11 September 1907, stricken on 16 February 1923 and finally broken up despite the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 allowed Italy to keep her in service. Of the Regina Elena-class consisting of the Regina Elena, Roma, Napoli and the Vittorio Emanuel designed by Vittorio Cuniberti preceded by the Regina Margherita-class and succeeded by the Dante Alighieri.
2. Laid down at the Castellammare Naval Shipyard on 21 October 1903, launched on 10 September 1905, completed on 1 September 1908, stricken on 3 September 1926 and finally broken up. Of the Regina Elena-class consisting of the Regina Elena, Roma, Napoli and the Vittorio Emanuel designed by Vittorio Cuniberti preceded by the Regina Margherita-class and succeeded by the Dante Alighieri.
3. Laid down at the La Spezia Naval Shipyard on 20 September 1903, launched on 21 April 1907, completed on 17 December 1908, stricken on 3 September 1926 and finally broken up. Of the Regina Elena-class consisting of the Regina Elena, Roma, Napoli and the Vittorio Emanuel designed by Vittorio Cuniberti.

Russian Doema refused budget for new battleships according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra Post dated 21 March 1908


An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 21th reported that the budget commission of the Russian Doema disapproved the budget needed for building new battleships. The Doema demanded a reorganisation of the navy and that fleet program were to be approved by law, now and in the future.(1)

Note
1. The 24.900 tons Gangut-class battleships built at Russian shipyards between 1909-1914, consisting of the Gangut, Petropavlovsk, Sevastopol and Poltava. The international design contest was win by the German ship Blohm un Voss, Hamburg, Germany.

Japanese navy intended to keep large scale manoeuvres according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 24 July 1908

An item reported that Japan intended to keep naval manoeuvres in the Chinese Sea and the area between Formosa and Kioesioe. The manoeuvres were to be attended by totally were 11 battleships, 13 armoured cruisers, 10 protected cruisers, 7 small cruisers, 5 ships of another kind, 119 torpedo boats, destroyers and gunboats and 7 submarines.

Anarchists intended to blow up American battle fleet according to the Dutch newspaper Haagsche courant dated 22 January 1908

An item reported that an anarchistic complot was discovered with planned to blow up the complete American battleship squadron underway towards the Pacific.(1)

Note
1. The Great White Fleet consisting of 16 battleships divided over two squadrons sent by the American president Theodore Roosevelt around the world between 16 December 1907 and 22 February 1909.

German proposals for building Russian battleships accepted according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 24 August 1908


An item dated St. Petersburg, Russia 23rd reported that the Russian cabinet accepted the proposals of a firm from Hamburg, Germany to built 20.000 tons battleships with a speed of 21,5 miles and a main armament of 12” guns.(1)

Note
1. The 24.900 tons Gangut-class battleships built at Russian shipyards between 1909-1914, consisting of the Gangut, Petropavlovsk, Sevastopol and Poltava. The international design contest was win by the German ship Blohm un Voss, Hamburg, Germany.

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

British container ship (ex-Starlight 2002-?, ex-Maersk Vigo ?-2008) Bomar Victory 2008-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Marshall islands-flagged, IMO 9242649, MMSI 538005468 and call sign V7EH2. Ex-Starlight and ex-Maersk Vigo renamed February 2014. Owned and managed by Borealis Maritime, London, United Kingdom. Built by J Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2002.

Chinese bulk carrier Ocean Beauty 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 September 2016

Hong Kong-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9642186, MMSI 477305100 and call sign VRLB4. Built by Shimanami Shipyard, Imabari, Japan in 2012-. Owned and managed by Ocean Longevity Shipping&Management, Hong Kong, China.

Portugal -flagged container ship (ex-Euro Solid 2006-2012, 3 Oak 2012-?) Dance

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 September 2016

Portugal-flagged, homeport Madeira, IMO 9360972, MMSI 255805836 and call sign CQBH. Ex-Euro Solid renamed April 2012 and ex-3 Oak renamed? Built by Peters Schiffswerft, Wewelsfleth, Germany in 2006. As the 3 Oak Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, owned by Woodstreet, Hong Kong, China and managed by Wallem, Hamburg, Germany.

Marshall islands-flagged oil products tanker (ex-Front Dee (2014-) Ardmore Explorer 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 September 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9654581, MMSI 538005088 and call sign V7AX6. Ex-Front Dee, owned by Sea Hull S1598. Monrovia, Liberia and managed by Thome Shipmanagement, Singapore. Built by STX Offhore&Shpbuilding, Jinhae, South Korea in 2014.

Dutch oil/chemical tanker Stolt Sea 1999-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 September 2016

Cayman Islands, homeport George Town, IMO 9149495, MMSI 319478000 and call sign ZCSQ7. Built by Astillero La Naval, Sestao, Spain in 1999. Owned and managed by Stolt Tankers, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Polish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Deniz S 2008-2014) Azuryth 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 September 2016

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9431020, MMSI 212228000 and call sign 5BCA4. Built by Nur Istanbul Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey in 2008. Ex-Deniz S renamed March 2014. Owned and managed by Unibaltic Shipping, Szczecin, Poland.

Maltese bulk carrier (ex-Yangfan 2288) Cielo di Valparaiso 2015-




Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 September 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9663776, MMSI 256484000 and call sign 9HA3928. Ex-Yangfan 2288. Owned by Eco Shipping, Valletta, Malta and managed by D’Amico Dry, Dublin, Ireland, Built by Zhoushan Shipyard, Zoushan, China in 2015.

The South American naval arms race according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwsblad van het Noorden dated 15 August 1908

Brazilian Minas Geraes-class

Argentinean Rivadavia-class

Chilean Almirante Latorre-class

An item reported that as due to the fact that Brazil was building new battleships (1) Argentine (2) decided to increase her small although excellent navy. The original intention was to built 3-15.000 ton battleships, 21 torpedo boats and 9 destroyers. Even before execution of this program decided was a new program made consisting of 2-20.000 tons battleships and an even larger number of torpedo boats and destroyers. The New York Herald suggested that it possible was that Argentine intended to sell her new battleships with profit following the Brazilian example. Chile (3) was in the meantime forced to expand also her navy to follow the naval arms race between the three major South American naval powers.

Notes
1. Only the Minas Geraes and São Paulo were realized based on a new design after the appearance on the scene of the HMS Dreadnought. The building of the three battleships on a now aged design was stopped. Displacement 18.976 tons and an original armament of 6x2-30,5cm/12” guns, 22-12cm/4,7“ guns and 8-,7cm 12 pd guns. The building of the third ship called Rio de Janeiro was again stopped and after redesigning she was first purchased by Turkey and finally purchased by the Royal British Navy when the First World War broke out and she was commissioned as the HMS Agincourt.
2. The Rivadavia-class consisting of the Rivadavia and the Moreno. Original armament 12-30,5cm/12” guns, 12-15,2cm/6” guns, 16-10,2c,m/4” guns and 2-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes and a displacement of 27.900 (standard)-30.600 (full load) tons.
3. The Almirante Latorre-class consisting of the Almirante Latorre and the Almirante Cochrane were ordered to be built in England in 1911 and 1912 with a displacement of 25.401 (standard)-32.514 (full load) tons and a main armament of 10-35,6cm/14” guns. Both ships were purchased by the Royal British Navy. The Almirante Latorre became HMS Canada but in 1920 resold to Chile retaining her original name. Her sister ship became the British aircraft carrier HMS Eagle

Russia ordered building of new battleships in England according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 25 April 1908

Gangut-class

An item dated London, England 23rd April reported that Russia ordered the building by a shipyard along the Clyde of 5 battleships larger as the HMS Dreadnought.(1)

Note
1. The 24.900 tons Gangut-class battleships built at Russian shipyards between 1909-1914, consisting of the Gangut, Petropavlovsk, Sevastopol and Poltava. The international design contest was win by the German ship Blohm un Voss, Hamburg, Germany.

American battleships insufficient armoured according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 28 March 1908

An item dated Washington, USA 27th referred to a recently published report of admiral Evans (1) dealing with naval experts who were on board during the voyage of the battle fleet.(2) It became that the height of the armoured belt of the battleships was insufficient for a well protection.

Notes
1. Robley Dunglison Evans (18 August 1846 Floyd County, Virginia, USA-3 January 1912 Washington, USA), served in the US navy between 1864-1908, commanded the Great White Fleet and dismissed in the rank of rear admiral.
2. The Great White Fleet consisting of 16 battleships divided over two squadrons sent by the American president Theodore Roosevelt around the world between 16 December 1907 and 22 February 1909.

Russian State Council approved new building battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Haagsche Courant dated 30 June 1908

Gangut-class

An item reported that the Russian State Council the budget for building 4 new battleships approved in contrary to the Doema.(1)

Note
1. The 24.900 tons Gangut-class battleships built between 1909-1914, consisting of the Gangut, Petropavlovsk, Sevastopol and Poltava. The international design contest was win by the German shipyard Blohm un Voss, Hamburg, Germany.

French minister of navy asked permission for building new battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 18 December 1908

Danton-class

Courbet-class

An item reported that the French minister of navy announced that he would sent a law proposal to the parliament asking for permission to built new large battleships.(1)

Note
1. The Danton-class consisting of the Danton, Voltaire, Diderot, Condorcet, Mirabeau and Vergniaud with a displacement of 18.318 (normal)-19.663 (full load) tons to succeed the Liberté-class and of which the building started in 1908. Succeeded by the 23.475 (standard)-25.579 (full load) tons Courbet-class built between 1910-1914 consisting of the Courbet, Jean Bart, France and Paris.

American naval commissioned advices building large floating docks at naval base at Honolulu, Hawaii according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 2 March 1908

An item dated Washington, USA 1st reported that the naval commission of the House of Representatives advices to built floating docks large enough to dock the largest battleships. There were two docks needed, one for the Atlantic and one for the Pacific. Furthermore was suggested to convert the Pearl harbour at Honolulu, Hawaii into a navy base.

German shipyard Blohm und Voss designed new Russian battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 25 August 1908

Gangut-class

An item reported that the Russian admiralty accepted the designs made by the German shipyard Blohm und Voss, Hamburg for the building of battleships at Russian shipyards using Russian materials.(1)

Note
1. The 24.900 tons Gangut-class battleships built between 1909-1914, consisting of the Gangut, Petropavlovsk, Sevastopol and Poltava. The international design contest was win by the German shipyard Blohm un Voss, Hamburg, Germany.

British fleet cruising in Aegean Sea to prevent an eventual Greek invasion on Crete according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 12 October 1908

An item dated London, England 11th reported that the British fleet was cruising in the Aegean Sea to prevent a repeat of the Greek invasion on Crete in 1897.(1)

Note
1. The Greco-Turkish War of 5 April-8 May 1897 resulted in an autonomy for the Ottoman province Crete despite Greece losing the war. In November 188 forced 1908 Great Britain, France, Italy and Russia the Ottoman Empire to found an autonomous Cretan State which was de facto united with Greece on 24 September 1908 and de jure in 1913.

Monday, 26 September 2016

England building more battleships and armoured cruisers then France and Germany together according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 7 March 1907

HMS Dreadnought. Displacement 18.400 tons and a main armament of 5x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 

British Bellerophon-class dreadnoughts. 
Displacement 18.800 tons and a main armament of 5x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 

British St. Vincent-class dreadnoughts. 
Displacement 19.560 tons and a main armament of 5x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 


British dreadnought HMS Neptune. 
Displacement 19.680 tons and a main armament of 5x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 

British Coloussus-class dreadnoughts. 
Displacement 20.225 tons and a main armament of 5x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 

British Orion-class dreadnoughts. 
Displacement 22.000 tons and a main armament of 5x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 

French Courbet-class dreadnoughts. 
Displacement “23.475 (standard) tonnes and a main armament of 6x2-30,5cm/12” guns. 

German Nassau-clas dreadnoughts. 
Displacement 18.873 (design)-21.000 (full load) tons and a main armament of 6x2-28cm/11” guns

An item dated London, England 5th stated the British deputy secretary of navy of navy E. Robertson (1) in the House of Commons that the admiralty was a supporter of a two power armament principle, namely for battleships the Dreadnought-design and for armoured cruisers the Invincible-design. In the summer of 1909 were 6 battleships and 3 armoured cruisers available, French and Germany however none. In 1910 would England have 9 battleships (2) and 3 armoured cruisers, France (3) 2 battleships and Germany (4) 4 battleships and 2 armoured cruisers.

Notes
1. Edmund Robertson, 1st Baron Lochee (28 October 1845-13 September 1911), parliamentary and financial secretary to the Admiralty 1982-1895 and 12 December 1905-12 April 1908. Liberal politician, barrister and academic.
2. Since the HMS Dreadnought (1905), were several dreadnought battleships built such as the Bellerophon-class consisting of the Bellerophon (1906), Superb (1907) and Temeraire, the Saint Vincent-class consisting of the St. Vincent (1907), Collingwood (1907) and Vanguard (1908), the Neptune (1909), the Colussus-class consisting of the Colossus (1909) and Hercules and the Orion-class consisting of the Orion (1909), Monarch (1910). Conqueror (1910) and Thunderer (1910. Data between brackets are year of laid down.
3. The first French dreadnoughts were the 23,475 (standard)-25.579 (full load) tons Courbet-class consisting of the Courbet (1910), France (1911), Jean Bart (1910) and Paris (1911), succeeded by the semi-dreadnought Danton-class consisting of the Danton, Voltaire, Diderot, Condorcet, Mirabeau and Vergniaud with a displacement of 18.318 (normal)-19.663 (full load) tons to succeed the Liberté-class and of which the building started in 1907.
4. The first German dreadnoughts were those of the Nassau-class consisting of the Nassau (1907), Westfalen (1907), Rheinland (1907) and Posen (1907) with a displacement of 18.873 (design)-20.535-21.000 (full load) tons.

Colliers waiting at Djibouti waiting for the Russian Baltic Fleet according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra post dated 24 March 1905

An item dated Singapore 24th reported that at Djibouti 34 colliers were lying waiting for the Russian Baltic fleet underway towards the Far East (1)which was to arrive there at the end of March.

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

British Mediterranean Fleet could be decreased due to friendly relations with France according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 16 October 1905

An item dated London, England 16th reported that the Telegraph Tribune and Chronicle claimed that what the Standard wrote about the disarmament not correct was. The Mediterranean Fleet could be reduced due to the friendly relations with France.

The strength of the British Channel and Atlantic Fleets according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 16 October 1905

An item dated London, England 16th reported that the British Channel fleet consisted of 14 battleships and 4 armoured cruisers and the Atlantic Fleet of 6 battleships, 4 cruisers and a reserve division of 20 battleships.

Japan intended to even more battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 18 July 1906

Satsuma-class. Displacement 19.372-20.100 tons and a main armament of2x2-30,5cm/12"guns and 6x2-25,4cm/10" guns. 

Kawachi-class. Displacement 20.823-21.443 normal) tons and main armament 2x2-30,5cm 12"/50 guns and 4x2-30,5cm 12"/45 guns. 

An item dated London, England 17th reported that Japan except for the already laid down battleships considered the building of even more battleships (1) and cruisers.

Note
1. The Katori-class consisting of the Katori and Kasima commissioned on 20 respectively 23 May 1906. The Satsuma-class consisting of the Satsuma and Aki laid down on respectively 15 May 1905 and 15 March 1905 and commissioned in respectively 25 March 1910 and 11 March 1911. The Kawachi-class consisting of the Kawachi and Settsu was laid down on respectively 1 April and 18 January 1909.

French cabinet wanted to built six 18.000 tons battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 9 March 1906

Danton-class


An item reported that the French cabinet proposed the building of 6-18.000 ton battleships with a speed of 18 knots.(1)

Note
1. The Danton-class consisting of the Danton, Voltaire, Diderot, Condorcet, Mirabeau and Vergniaud with a displacement of 18.318 (normal)-19.663 (full load) tons to succeed the Liberté-class and of which the building started in 1907.

Japanese spy arrested at Padang, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 12 January 1905

An item reported that at Padang, Sumatra. Dutch East Indies a Japanese was arrested just before his departure towards Singapore. In his possession were drawings of the Emmahaven and local defence works. He lived already for some time at Padang and was observed by the police.(1)

Note
1. Nowadays known as Teluk Bayur, the largest harbour at the west side of Sumatra, dating from 1888 and made as ordered by the of the Netherlands.

French squadron underway from Europe towards French Indochina according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 12 January 1905

An item reported that at Sabang, Dutch East Indies a French battleship escorted by 2 destroyers and 6 torpedo boats arrived underway from Europe towards Saigon, French Indochina.

Japanese seized British blockade runner Eastrigg according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 10 February 1905

An item dated Tokyo, Japan 9th reported that the Japanese seized off the island Hokkaido the British steamship Eastrigg loaded with coals and bound for Vladivostok.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

England and the events in the Far East according to the Dutch newspaper Leeuwarder courant dated 1 July 1905

An item reported that during the naval budget discussions in the British House of Commons Colomb (1) referred to the situation in the Pacific wondering who would rule the waves over there.(2) Bowles (3) meant that others referred to the altered balance in the North Sea. It was unknown on which term allies needed help. Minister Pretyman (4) answered that what happened in the Far East influenced the British naval policy in many ways. He denied that England intended to become the major power in the Far East or elsewhere as long as British merchant interests were protected. The British naval force in the Far East was strong enough for the needs at the moment and on longer term.

Notes
1. Sir John Charles Ready Colomb (1 May 1838-27 May 1909), British naval strategist, conservative 1politician 1886-1892 and 1895-1906. Author of Naval Intelligence and the Protection of Commerce in 1881 and Use and the application of Marine Forces in 1883.
2. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.
3. George Frederic Stewart Bowles (17 November 1877-1 January 1955), Conservative politician, naval officer and member of parliament 1906-1910.
4. Ernest George Pretyman (13 November 1860-26 November 1931), Conservative politician. Amy officer. Civil Lord of the Admiralty 1900-1903 and 1916-1919 and parliamentary and financial secretary to the admiralty 1903-1906.

Sunday, 25 September 2016

German bulk carrier (ex-Glorious Future 1994-1999, Aliacmon River 1999-2005, Theotokos 2005-2006) Barbara 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 September 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9066760, MMSI 636092335 and call sign D5AO6. Built by IHI Achi Works, Chita, Japan in 1994. Owned by Mineralien Schiffahrt Spedition&Transport, Schnaittenbach, Germany. Ex-Glorious Future renamed April 1999, Aliacmon River renamed June 2005 and Theotokos renamed November 2006.

Danish general cargo ship (ex-Wilma Frank 1966-1972, Douro Star 1982-1985, Wilma Frank 1982, Dorca 1982-1989) Saturn 1989-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Denmark-flagged, homeport, Noerresundby, IMO 6604690, MMSI 219000245 and call sign OUHO2. Built by Vooruitgang Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 1966. Owned and managed by Norresundby Shipping, Aalborg, Denmark. Ex-Wilma Frank renamed 1972, Douro Star renamed 5 November 1982, Wilma Frank renamed 5 November 1982 and Dorca renamed 20 July 1989.

German general cargo ship Suntis 1985-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Germany-flagged, homeport Munstrdor/Itzehoe, IMO 8513314, MMSI 218005000 and call sign DUXS. Built by Peters Schffswerft, Wewelsfleth, Germany in 1985. Owned and managed by Warnecke Luise&Uw, Heiligenstedten, Germany.

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Emilia Theresa 1998-2002) Bitten Theresa 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9165451, MMSI 248373000 and call sign 9HA2337. Ex-Emilia Theresa renamed September 2002. Built by Tuzla Shipbuilding Industry, Istanbul, Turkey in 1998. Owned and managed by Herning Shipping, Herning. Denmark.

Danish oil/chemical tanker Baltic Swift 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, 16 September 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9464376, MMSI 229879000 and call sign 9HA3688. Other sources claiming Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, Cyprus and MMSI 212132000. Owned and managed by Norient Product Pool, Hellerup, Denmark. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2010.

England sending warships towards Tangier, Morocco according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 June 1904

An item dated London, England 7th reported that the British battleship Prince of Wales (1) would depart the next morning to Tangier, Morocco and a cruiser and 7 other battleships would depart any moment from Gibraltar with the same destination.(2)

Notes
1. Of the Formidable-class, laid down at the Chatham Dockyard on 20 March 1901, launched on 25 March 1903, commissioned on 18 May 1904 and sold to be broken up on 12 April 1920.
2. As a result of the First Moroccan Crisis ot Tangier Crisis March 1905-May 1906 dealing with the status Morocco, with Germany supporting the sovereignty of the Moroccan sultan Abdelaziz against France and United Kingdom.

Japan ordering in the USA steel for her battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 9 September 1904

An item dated London, England 9th reported that the Japanese cabinet ordered in the USA the livery of 75 on nickel steel plates of the best quality needed for her battleships.

French dockworkers still striking at Marseille, France according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 9 September 1904

An item reported that at Marseille, France the harbour workers were working again, but the dockworkers still striking demanding that the agreement of 1903 was still leading.

British Royal Navy intended to condemn large number of ships according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra Post dated 19 December 1904

An item dated London, England 14th reported that due to a reorganisation within the British Royal navy 3 battleships, 30 cruisers and 17 gunboats which were useless were to be condemned for naval duties.

Japanese Sea filled with sea mines according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 November 1904

An item reported that according to the steamship Formosa which arrived at Marseille, France she off Shanghai, China nearly struck a sea mine. Her master stated that the Japanese Sea was filled with dangerous mines. Further more was chased and stopped by 3 Japanese cruisers who investigated his cargo. Her complained at the consul at Port Said, Egypt about this investigation.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Russian steamship Jaralsaw underway for bunkering Russian Baltic Fleet according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 November 1904

An item dated London, England 7th reported that the Russian steamship Jaralsaw of the Voluntary Fleet loaded with coal and water passed the Bosporus to join the Russian Baltic Fleet which was underway towards the Far East.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Russian destroyers arrived at Algiers, Algeria according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 2 November 1904

An item reported the arrival of 3 Russian destroyers [of the Baltic Fleet underway towards the Far East] arrived at Algiers, Algeria coming from Tangier, Morocco.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

German and British colliers underway for bunkering Russian Baltic Fleet according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 2 November 1904

An item referred to tidings received from Las Palmas, Canary islands that 4 German colliers loaded coal for the Russian Baltic Fleet [underway towards the Far East] departed towards Cameroon and 3 British steamships also loaded with coal towards Réunion.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Location of Russian Baltic Fleet unknown to Russian admiralty according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 27 October 1904

An item reported that the Russian admiralty had no idea of the position of her Baltic Fleet underway towards the Far East.(1) Communication efforts failed until now. A second item reported that 4 of the battleships arrived at Vigo, Spain. The others were still underway.

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

American squadron underway from Guam towards the Philippines according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 1 February 1904

An item dated Tokyo, Japan 13th reported that an American squadron consisting of 3 battleships and 4 cruisers left Guam, Ladrones Islands ]=Mariana Islands] towards Manila, Philippines.(

Saturday, 24 September 2016

Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. (ex-KXXI) O-21 1937-1957


Became the most successful Dutch submarine during the Second World War. Originally to be named K XXI. Sister ships O22-27. Design of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Supervisor during building was naval chief engineer G. de Rooij. Contract signed on 10/19 June 1937, ordered on 12 April 1937, to be delivered on 10 December 1939, 580 ton steel no. 52 à 203,65 per ton ordered on 3 February 1937, laid down in shed II on the island shipyard of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with yard number 207 on 13 July 1938, machinery placed between 8 May-28 September 1939, launched by Mrs. M.W. Kwak-Bout on at 13.15 o’clock 21 October 1939, docked 9-27 December 1939 and 10-12 April 1940, trials while berthed 30 November and 1 December 1939, technical trial 9 January-10 March 1940, torpedo testing off Den Helder, Netherlands 5-20 March 1940, delivered on 12 May 1940, left 12 May 1940 the locks at Vlissingen bound for England under own power, there finished at Rosyth, Scotland and ready on 22 June 1940, de commissioned on 2 November 1957 and sold to the firm G.P. van Beckum, Alkmaar, Netherlands to be broken up on 24 January 1958.

Dimensions 77,70 (over all) x 6,20-6,55 x 5.851 (hold at thrush no. 70) x 3,940 metres. Draught at launching with a displacement of 836 tons was 3,01 (fore)-3,63 (aft) metres. Displacement 974/990 (surfaced)-1.186/1.208,5 (submerged ) tons. Standard displacement 889,47 tons. Speed 19,5 (surfaced)-9 (submerged) knots. Three screws. Two-7 cylinder Sulzer Diesel engines supplying at 450 rpm totally 5.300 ahp. 70% was welded instead of riveted.

German light cruiser SMS (ex-Ersatz Ariadne) Dresden


Of the Cöln-class consisting of the completed Cöln and Dresden, the launched but never completed Wiesbaden, Magdeburg, Leipzig, Rostock and Frauenlob and the 3 Ersatz Cöln, Ersatz Emden and Ersatz Karlsruhe laid down down but never completed. Preceded by the Königsberg-class. Building ordered under the contract name Ersatz Ariadne. Laid down at Blohm und Voss, Hamburg, Germany with yard number 601in 1916, launched on 25 April 1917, commissioned on 28 March 1919, scuttled by her own crew at Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles on 21 June 1919and her wrecks till remains thee.

Displacement 5.629 (design)-7.486 (full load) tons and as dimensions 155,5 (0ver all) x 14,2 x 6,01 metres or 510 x 47 x 19.7 feet. The two sets of steam turbines and 8 coal fired and six oil fired Marine-type boilers supplied via 2 shafts 31.000 allowing a maximum speed of 27,5 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of around 6.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 559 men included 17 officers. The armour consisted of an (amidships) 6cm/2.4” thick belt, a 6cm/2.4” thick deck and the conning tower protected by 10cm/3.9“ thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-15cm/5,91” L/45 quick firing guns, 3x8,8cm3.5” L/45 anti aircraft guns and 4-6ocm/24” torpedo tubes and she could carry 200 mines with her.

French navy in excellent condition according to minister of navy Pelltan according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

Victor Hugo

An item dated Paris, France 24th reported that in a meeting of the French naval commissioned the minister of navy Pellestan (1) supplied extensively and satisfying details about the French naval strength. Although he saw none conflict in advance needed France to prepared for any event. The fleet was in excellent condition and now strengthened with armoured cruisers of which performances the navy had huge expectations.(2)  Just like the British Royal Navy possessed France 5 armoured cruisers of a modern type and within short time were another 5 of the same type to be armed. Considered the Far East (3) was it impossible that the French maintained there a squadron equal to the Americans, British and Japanese. However four French destroyers would depart to strengthen the French naval force in the Far East.

Notes
1. Charles Camille Pellet an (28 June 1846 Paris, France-4 June 1915), minister of navy 7 June 1902-24 January 1905, (radical) Republican politician and journalist.
2. The Léon Gambetta-class consisting of the Léon Gambetta, Jules Ferry and Victor Hugo. Further more the Jules Michelet, Ernst Renan and the Edgar Quintet-class consisting of the Edgar Quintet and Waldeck-Rousseau.
3. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.