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Sunday, 23 April 2017

German reefer Esmeralda 1999-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9181170, MMSI 220737000 and call sign 9HA3564. Owned and managed by Triton Schiffahrt, Leer, Germany. Built by Iwagi Shipbuilding, Kamijima, Japan in 1999. 

Finnish icebreaker Voima 1951-

Helsink, Finland 17 April 2017

Laid down by Wärtsilä Hietalahti shipyard, Helsinki, Finland with yard number 349 on 29 May1951, launched by Sylvi Kekkonen on 27 November 1952 and commissioned on 13 February 1954. IMO 5383158, MMSI 230291000 and call sign OHLW. Owned by the Finnish Maritime Administration 1953-2004, Finstahip between 2004-2010 and since then by Jäänmurtja Voima Oy.

When built a gross tonnage of 3.850 tons , dimensions 83,5 x 19,4 x 6,4 x 9,5 (depth) metres or 273.11 x 63.8 x 21.0 x 31.2  feet. 6x1.500 KW Diesel electric driving 4 shafts allowing a speed of 16,5 knots. Crew numbered 58 men. Rebuilt by her original building hard between 1978-1979. Now gross tonnage 4.159 tons, net tonnage 1.248 tons, deadweight 4.486 tons, displacement 5.209 tons and as dimension s 83,5 x 19,4 x 7 x 9,4 (depth) metres or 273.11 x 63.8 x 23.0 x 31.2 feet. Horsepower now 6x2.140 kW allowing a speed of 16 knots and with 1.2 metres thick ice is her speed 2 knots. Crew numbered 21 men. 

Dutch shipyard trying to obtain naval orders from Poland in April-May 1934


Between 8 April-20 May 1934 made Mr. A. Smit a journey to the Russia, Estonia, Latonia and Poland as ordered by three of the Dutch major shipyards including his own yard of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde). The intention was to obtain orders from the navies of these countries.

After his arrival at Warsaw, Poland spoke Smit first the Dutch consul Pereboom and the representative Karsten. Karsten introduced him at the Polish Chief Material commodore Czernicki.(1) Czernicki made him clear that the negotiations with France for submarines and with Sweden for torpedo boats were in such advanced stage that tenders of other shipyards were not asked for unless the negotiation failed when trade was refused. Smit believed that the Dutch shipyards had hardly any chance in Poland now or in the future.(2) The only possibility he could imagine was building an own shipyard at Gdynia with guaranteed orders from the Polish cabinet. And to be honest he had hardly faith in such a guarantee.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipalty Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) T 214.382.

Notes
1. Rear admiral Xawery Stanislaw Czernicki (16 October 1882 Giedejki, Russian Empre, nowadays Vilnius, Lithuania-March/April Katyn 1940) Polish engineer and to be considered as one of the founder of the logistical services within the Polish navy. Graduated at the Russian Imperial Naval Engineering School at Kronstadt lead engineer of the Gangut-class battleships Sevastopol and Petropavlovsk, since 1919 in the Polish navy and appointed as Chief of Technical Services and since 1932 Chief of Services and Deputy Commander of the Chief of Polish navy in the Ministry of Military Affairs.
2. Czernicki lead a commission which supervised the building of the submarines ORP Wilk (launched on 12 April 1929 by A.C. Augustin-Normand), Rys (launched on 22 April 1929 by A.C. de la Loire, Nantes) and Zbik (launched on 14 June 1931 by CNF) in France.
3. Smit could not have been more wrong with this prediction. A few years later were two submarines built in the Netherlands including the famous Orzel! She was even built by De Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands. Laid down 14 August 1936, launched on 15 January 1938 and commissioned on 2 February 1939. All contacts with her were lost after 2 June 1940. She is still on patrol with her wreck still undiscovered just like the Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O13, built by the same shipyard and disappeared at the same time. 

Dutch shipyards trying to obtain orders from Estonia in April-May 1934


Between 8 April-20 May 1934 made Mr. A. Smit a journey to the Russia, Estonia, Latonia and Poland as ordered by three of the Dutch major shipyards including his own yard of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde). The intention was to obtain orders from the navies of these countries.

According Smit’s report asked Estonia the three British shipyards of Vickers, Cammell Laird and J. Samuel White (East Cowes) for tenders for building two submarines, suitable to take a small number with them. The Finnis shipyard Abo supported by Inkavos (1) also sent a tender. There was however no chance for the Finnish yard to obtain the order. In the past suffered the yard with problems with building and even delivered far too late. Further more was Estonia more or less obliged to let the submarines built in England due to earlier contracts.(2) The only thing Smit could do was recommending the Schelde-Gunning submarine minelayer.(3) He succeeded to get chief staff captain Gerret [or Cerret?} interested in this design who advices him to contact J. Samuel White. Gerret assured Smit that if White came with a tender for a Schelde-Gunning submarine especially when she was cheaper the tender certainly would be considered. Building under licence in Estonia was no option as became clear in a discussion with director Maim of the navy yard. The buildings costs were to become to high. Smit got the advice not to contact Vickers while this shipyard was too pigheaded and he got the impression that Vickers was far from popular in Estonia. Estonian navy officers were partly trained in England and future Estonian submarine commanding officers had to serve from some time in the British Royal navy. The Dutch consul Mr. Lukk, former minister of navy in Estonia, had been a great support for Smit and seemed to have still a large influence.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) Y 214.382.

Notes
1. Inkavos or Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw was after the First World War founded to preserve and improve the German submarine knowledge. The firm was housed in the The Hague, Netherlands and designed among other warships submarines for many European navies.
2. Vickers-Armstrong built for Estonia the Kalev-class submarines consisting of the Kalev (launched in 1937) and the Lembit (launched in 1936), the latter still existing and which were able to carry 20 mines with them.
3. The Schelde-Gunning submarine minelayer was an own design of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands. The dimensions and displacement could vary. For instance was for Brazil in the same years a submarine of 932 (submerged) tons with a length of 72 metres, a speed of 16-16,5 (surfaced)-9,.25 (submerged) knots and able to carry 36 mines with her advices. 

Dutch shipyards trying to obtain naval orders from Latvia in April-May 1934

Between 8 April-20 May 1934 made Mr. A. Smit a journey to the Russia, Estonia, Latonia and Poland as ordered by three of the Dutch major shipyards including his own yard of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde). The intention was to obtain orders from the navies of these countries.

Smit had in Latonia a meeting with Graaf Kesselring (1)who was now retired and being a former submarine commanding officer in the Russian navy. Keyserling told him that in the near future Latvia would not increase her building program in contrary to Lithuania. A friend of him was the chief staff of the Lithuanian submarine and he suggested to contact him. In the past bought Latvia submarines from France.(2) Smit asked Keyserling if he was interested to become agent for the Dutch shipyards in Estonia and give his answer within some weeks.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) T 214.382.

Notes
1 Archibald Keyserlingk (Augustenhof, Grobina, Courland now Latvia 6 November 1882, Frankfurt am Main, Germany 15 December 1951), between 1922-1931 with the rank of admiral the first minister of navy of Latvia. After resigning he stayed at Riga where he was responsible of naval construction yards. Served since 1909 in the Baltic Fleet after his successful study at the officers school for submarine officers at Libau.
2. This must be the Ronis-class built by A.C. Augustin-Normand and consisting of the Ronis (launched on 1 July 1926) and the Spidola (launched on 6 October 1926). 

Dutch shipyards trying to obtain naval orders from Russia in April-May 1934

Between 8 April-20 May 1934 made Mr. A. Smit a journey to the Russia, Estonia, Latonia and Poland as ordered by three of the Dutch major shipyards including his own yard of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde). The intention was to obtain orders from the navies of these countries.

Smit referred to the efforts Russia did in the 1930’s to obtain plans and technical support for building warships especially submarines. The Kon. Mij. De Schelde was the major builder of submarines in the Netherlands at that time and developed even her own Schelde-Gunning submarine minelayer. Smit contacted the Dutch agent Kaufmann in Moscow to come in contact with the Russian authorities. His efforts seemed to be successful and a meeting for 4 May was arranged. On 3 May however the meeting was cancelled and no new appointment made neither the reasons given why. Smit went towards Estonia and later heard from his agents in Berlin, Germany that the Russians were not united in their naval policy. What became clear that the famous German firm Inkavos (1) was unpopular due to her relation with Krupp. There was still no decision made about the replacement by Inkavos by another firm. Smit wrote that it was even possible that within 6 weeks the negotiations would be restarted while there seemed to be a great interest in the Dutch shipyards. What he didn’t like was his total independence from his agents. In the meantime had Russia hardly a choice believed Smit, or Inkavos or the Dutch yards while a cooperation with a major power was taboo especially for technical support caused by the bad experiences with the British and others.(2) Within some weeks was his agent Kaufmann expected to come to the Netherlands and where he would meet the 3 shipyards and discuss the desired policy.

Despite all efforts there were none submarines in the Netherlands built for Russia.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) T 214.382.

Notes
1. Inkavos or Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw was after the First World War founded to preserve and improve the German submarine knowledge. The firm was housed in the The Hague, Netherlands and designed among other warships submarines for many European navies including Russia! See for instance this note on: http://warshipsresearch.blogspot.nl/2017/03/russian-engineers-studying-german.html
There was a relation between INKAVOS and the NV Nederlandsche Vereenigde Scheepsbouw Bureau Nevesbu  (NVSB), which latter organisation represented the interests of the major Dutch shipyards including Kon. Mij. De Schelde The head of Nevesbu was the naval engineer Gunning, former employee of the Royal Netherlands Navy and the Kon.Mij. De Schelde for which shipyard he designed the Schelde-Gunning submarine minelayer.
2. See for instance J. Rohwer and M.S. Monakov. Stalin’s Ocean-going fleet

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Turkish general cargo ship Caspian Harmony 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Hong Kong-flagged, IMO 9766645, MMSI 477588700 and call sign VRPC8. Built by Huanghua Shipbuilding, China in 2015. Owned and managed by Istanbul ShippinG AS, Istanbul, Turkey. 

Chinese containership OOCL Asia 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9300790, MMSI 477105600 and call sign VRBQ6. Owned and managed by OOCL, Hong Kong, China. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geje, South Korea in 2006. 

German oil/chemical tanker Othello 2014-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Luxembourg-flagged, IMO 9684110, MMSI 253279000 and call sign LXOD. Owned and managed by Gefo, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Tersan Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey in 2014. 

Turkish oil/chemical tanker Duzgit Harmony 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9445370, MMSI 249911000 and call sign 9HA2068. Owned and managed by DSM Gemi, Istanbul, Turkey. Built by Gemtis Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey in 2009. 

British oil/chemical tanker (ex-Isola Amaranto 1999-2005, Ero Amaranto 2005-2008) Crystal Amaranto 2008-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9172155, MMSI 248071000 and call sign 9HA2160. Owned by Euroceanica, London, England and managed by Crystal Pool, Genova, Italy. Built by Azimut Benetti Livorno, Livorno, Italy in 1999. Ex-Isola Amaranto renamed October 2005 and Euro Amranato renamed April 2008. 

British heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire (40) 1927-1942

Hawkins-class

Norfolk-class

Of the Norfolk sub-class of the County-class consisting of the Norfolk and Dorsetshire, preceded by the Hawkins-class and succeeded by the York-class. It was a slightly improved London-design with the positions of her anti aircraft armament and a lower bridge due to the removed topmost deck. Designed by Sir William Berry and built under the 1926-1927 Estimates.

Launched at the Portsmouth Dockyard, England on 21 September 1927, launched on 29 January 1929, commissioned on 30 September 1930 and sunk while underway towards Colombo, Ceylon together with the HMS Cornwall during a Japanese air attack on 5 April 1942. 

Displacement 10,196 (standard)-13,640 (full load) tons and as dimensions 192,86 x 20 x 5,5 metres or 632.9 x 66 x 18 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 Parsons Brown-Curtis geared steam turbines and 8 boilers supplying via 4 shafts 80.000 shp allowing a speed of 31,5 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of 12.000 nautical miles. Oil fuel bunker capacity 3.100 tons. Her crew numbered 719 (peacetime)-819 (wartime). The original armament consisted of 4x2-20,3cm/8” L/50 Mk VIII guns (super firing, 2 fore and 2 aft, 2, 4x1-10,2cm/4” L/45 Mk XVI quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4-3pd guns, 4-2pd pompom guns 2x4-53.3cm/21” torpedo tubes. In 1937 was the secondary armament changed into 4x2-4” dual purpose quick firing guns, and 8x2-2pd guns later even 24-2pd guns and the torpedo tubes were replaced by 61cm/24” ones. In the Second World War were 9-2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns added. In 1932 was she fitted out with a catapult to launched the seaplane she carried with her since 1931. 

British heavy cruiser HMS Norfolk (78) 1927-1950

Hawkins-class

Norfolk-class

Museums Victoria https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/381255

Of the Norfolk sub-class of the County-class consisting of the Norfolk and Dorsetshire, preceded by the Hawkins-class and succeeded by the York-class. It was a slightly improved London-design with the positions of her anti aircraft armament and a lower bridge due to the removed topmost deck. Designed by Sir William Berry and built under the 1926-1927 Estimates.

Laid down by Fairfield Shipping&Engineering Co. Ltd., Govan, Scotland on 8 July 1927, launched on 12 December 1928, commissioned on 30 April 1930, sold to BISCO be broken up on 3 January 1950 and arrived at Newport on 19 February 1950 to undergo her final fate.

Displacement 10,196 (standard)-13,640 (full load) tons and as dimensions 192,86 x 20 x 5,5 metres or 632.9 x 66 x 18 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 Parsons Brown-Curtis geared steam turbines and 8 boilers supplying via 4 shafts 80.000 shp allowing a speed of31,5 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of 12.000 nautical miles. Oil fuel bunker capacity 3.200 tons. Her crew numbered 719 (peacetime)-819 (wartime). The armament consisted of 4x2-20,3cm/8” L/50 Mk VIII guns (super firing, 2 fore and 2 aft, 2, 4x1-10,2cm/4” L/45 Mk XVI quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4-3pd guns, 4-2pd pompom guns 2x4-53.3cm/21” torpedo tubes. Could carry 2 Supermarine Walrus fling boats with her. 

British heavy cruiser HMS Surrey 1929-1930

Of the Surrey-sub-class of the County-class consisting of the Northumberland and Surrey, preceded by the Hawkins-class and succeeded by the York. The Surrey class was heavier armoured but their speed was 2 knots lower. Building ordered on 19 May 1929, suspended on 23 August 1929 and cancelled on 14 January 1930. Main armament consisted of 20,3cm/8” guns. 

British heavy cruiser HMS Northumberland 1929-1930

Of the Surrey-sub-class of the County-class consisting of the Northumberland and Surrey, preceded by the Hawkins-class and succeeded by the York. The Surrey class was heavier armoured but their speed was 2 knots lower. Building ordered on 19 May 1929, suspended on 23 August 1929 and cancelled on 14 January 1930. Main armament consisted of 20,3cm/8” guns. 

Curtiss float planes performed best in US Navy service according to the Dutch magazine Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 2

An item reported that the US Navy used 2 types of float planes. The Curtiss with glide boat performed the best. Lieutenant Towers flew with such a plane durinig 6,25 hour. 

The main guns of the Austrian battleship Viribus Unitis according to the Dutch magazine Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 2

Tegethoff-class

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht dated 1 March reporting that the Austrian battleship Viribus Unitis was armed with 30,5cm 45 cal guns with a weight of 54.300 tons firing projectiles with weight of 450 kilo. Vo 800 metres.(1)

Note
1. Built by the Stabilimento Technico Triestino. The first laid down on 24 July 1910, launched on 24 June 1911, completed on 5 December 1912 and sunk on 1 November 1918 in the harbour of Pola due to a mine. At that moment she was all ready transferred to Serbia. Main armament consisted of 12-30,5cm/12” guns. Of the Tegethoff-class. 

Successful tests with triple gun turrets of Italian battleship Dante Alighieri according to the Dutch magazine Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 2


An item referred to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated March reported that during the tests with the new Italian battleship Dante Alighieri also the tripe gun turrets were tested. The tests were such successful that also this magazine believed in an prosperous future for such turret2 while all technical omissions were solved and the advantages now became clear.(1)

Note
1. First Italian dreadnought battleship. Preceded by the Regina Elena-class and succeeded by the Conte di Cavour-class. Laid down at the Castellammare di Stabia navy yard on 6 June 1909, launched on 20 August 1910, completed on 15 January 1913, modernized in 1923, stricken on 1 July 1928 and finally broken up in that same year. She was designed by the Italian rear admiral engineer Edoardo Masdea (1) at that moment Chief Constructor of the Italian navy using the ideas of general Vittorio Cuniberti (2). The intention was to built a battleship with a main armament of the same calibre to be used for broadside fire and as much possible limited superstructure. The main armament consisted of 4x3-30,5cm/12” guns. 

American destroyer USS Parker launched according to the Dutch magazine Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 2

An item reported the launching on 8th February of the American destroyer USS Parker at Philadelphia, USA. Displacement 1.040 tons and a length of 91,4 metres. The machinery was to deliver 16.000 hp allowing a speed of 29,5 miles. The armament consisted of 5-10cm guns, 2 machineguns and 3 torpedo tubes.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Aylwin-class. Pennant D 48 later DD48. Call sign NIX. Building ordered in March 1911, laid down by William Cramp and Sons, Philadelphia, USA with yard number 385 on 11 March 1912, launched on 8 February 1913, commissioned on 20 January 1914, decommissioned on 6 June 1922, stricken on 8 March 1935 and ordered to be broken up on 23 April 1935. 

Austrian scout cruiser SMS Navara launched according to the Dutch magazine Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 2

An item reported that the Austrian scout Novara, an improved Admiral Spaun design was launched at Fiume [nowadays Rijeka, Krotia] on 15th February. She was to be armoured with a nickel steel made belt with a thickness of 6cm.91)

Note
1. Scout cruiser of the Novara-class. Laid down by Danubius Shipyard, Fiume [Rijeka, Croatia] on 9 December 1912, launched on 15 February 1913, commissioned on 10 January 1913, transferred to France as war prize, renamed Thionville and became training ship, since 1932 barracks ship at Toulon, France and broken up in 1941. 

US Navy bought 4.000 automatic revolvers according to the Dutch magazine Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 2

An item reported that the US Navy bought 4.000 automatic revolvers to be supplied to the gunboats, small cruisers and battleships. The other warships were in the future also to be fitted out with such revolvers. The reason to choose for the first three types of warships was that these ships probably were to first to be used for unexpected tasks including landing part of their crews. 

Friday, 21 April 2017

Dutch hydrographical survey vessel Zr.Ms. Snellius (A802) 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9271858, MMSI 245690000 and call sign PAUE. Laid down at the Damen Shipyards Galatz, Romania with yard number 391 on 25 June 2002 and completed at Vlissingen, Netherlands. Displacement maximum 1.875 tons and as dimensions 81,42 x 13,1 x 4 metres. Speed maximum 12 knots. The armament consists of 0.50” machineguns. Of the Snellius-class. 

Swedish general cargo ship (ex-Queensee 1991-1993, Diana J 1993, Intermodal Levant 1993-1996, MF Levant 1996-1999, Ingo J 1999-2005, Severnaya Divina 2005-2008) Swe-Bulk 2008-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, Cyprus, IMO 9044932, MMSI 210474000 and call sign C4FJ2. Owned and managed by Swedish Bulk Rederi, Gothenburg, Sweden. Built by ENVC, Viana do Catelo, Portugal in 1991. Ex-Queensee renamed September 1993, Diana J renamed Novmber 1993, Intermodal Levant renamed January 1996, MF Levant renamed January 1999,Ingo J renamed October 2005 and Severnaya Dvina renamed March 2008. 

Dutch containership Imke 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9341756, MMSI 246535000 and call sign PHGG. Built by Ferus Smit Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2006. Owned and managed by Wagenborg Shipping, Delfzijl, Netherlands. 

Chinese crude oil tanker Tao Lin Wan 2012-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

China-flagged, IMO 9614062, MMSI 414728000 and call sign BPGO. Built by Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Group, Dalian, China in 2012. Owned by China Shipping Development and managed by China Shipping Development Tanker. Shanghai, China. 

Hong Kong-flagged containership Delphis Bothnia 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 April 2017

Hong Kong-flagged, IMO 9763710, MMSI 477537200 and call sign VRPU4. Built at Hanjin Heavy Industries Shipyard, Busan, South Korea on 29 August 2016. Maersk Line. Part of Feeder-Operators Team Lines part of Delphis a container shipping subsidiary of Compagnie Maritime Belge (CMB), Antwerp, Belgium. 

Singapore oil/chemical tanker Navig8 Amessi 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 April 2017

Marshall Islands, IMO 9719745, MMSI 538005779 and call sign V7GX5. Built by Hyunfai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea as Hyundai Mipo 2520 in 2015. Owned and managed by Navig8 Chemicals Asia, Singapore. 

Greek bulk carrier (ex-KN Arcadia 2001-2005, Libre 2005-2012) Bulk Juliana 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 April 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9235854, MMSI 352486000 and call sign H9PF. Built by Shin Kurushima Toyohashi Shipbuilding, Toyohashi, Japan in 2001. Owned and managed by Seamar management, Athens, Greece. Ex-KN Arcadia renamed July 2005 and Libre renamed May 2012. 

French flotilla leaders project defined according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

An item reported that the French project of flotilla leaders (so’-called convoyeurs d’escadrilles) was now defined and the ships were to be laid down on short notice. With a length of 138 metres was the displacement 4.500 tons. The speed with the probably Parsons turbines machinery was to be 30 miles and the armament to consist of 8-14cm/5.5” guns and 4-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes. The armour was minimal with a thin high side armour with fore and behind the vital parts armoured bulkheads. 

England signing important fuel oil contract according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

An item reported that the British cabinet and the British-Persian Company signed a contract for the delivery of a large quantity of fuel oil for a period of some years. After approval by the parliament and supporting the company in the exploitation were almost existing and future oil wells in Persia available for the British Admiralty. 

France building new design destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 3

the Mécanicien Principal Lestin

An item reported that at Rochefort, France 2-1.200 tons destroyers of a new design were to be laid down armed with the 2/3-14cm/5.5” guns.(1)

Note
1. At the Arsenal de Rochefort were on respectively 13 July and 15 May 1915 the Enseigne Roux and the Mécanicien Principal Lestin launched. The Enseigne Roux-class was preceded by the Bisson-class and succeeded by the Aventurier-class and had a displacement of 850 normal)-1.075 (deep load) tons and an armament of 2x1-10cm/3.9” Mle 1893 guns, 4x1-6,5cm/2.6” Mle 1902 guns and 2x2-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

The quadruple gun turrets of the French Normandie-class battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1915-1915 no. 3

Normandie-class

An item reported that the French Normandie-class was fitted out with quadruple gun turrets divided with armoured bulkheads into two compartments with each a pair of guns using one cradle. The intention was to fire with 2 guns at the same time although care was taken to fire all four guns at the same time without disabling the turret. Each turret had a range-finder on a large foundation below the guns. The fore turret could be used as 2nd fire control station. The 24-14cm/5.5” L/55 were mounted armoured triple redoubts.(1)

Note
1. The Normandie-class 25.230 tons battleships to consist of the Normandie, Flandre, Gascogne, Languedoc and Béarn, preceded by the Bretagne-class and succeeded by the planned but not realized Lyon-class and the actual built Dunkerque-class was to consist of 5 units of which just one the Béarn was completed although as an aircraft carrier. The main armament was to consist of 4x3-34cm/13” /45 Modè 1912 guns.  

British experts asking for gun turrets with 3 guns or more according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 3

An item reported that the introduction of the 38cm guns in the Royal British Navy and the French plans to arm their battleships with 16-34,3cm guns had side effects. Experts in British newspapers like the Naval and Military Record asked for gun turrets with more than 2 guns. The Yacht dated 9 May 1914 reported that there was a chance that under the programs of 1914/1915 or 1915/1916 that a new design for such a gun turret could be expected. 

British submarines receiving anti aircraft guns according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 3

An item reported that the British 1.500 ton submarines were to be fitted out with 7,6cm guns to be uses as anti aircraft guns on specially manufactured mountings. 

Thursday, 20 April 2017

British patrol vessel HMS Example (P165)

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 April 2017

Built by Watercraft, Shoreham by Sea as the XSV Example as an Example tender similar to the Archer-class P2000-type patrol and training vessel. Commissioned on 16 January 1986. Reclassified in 1994 when she was handed over to the British Royal Navy when the Royal Naval Auxiliary Service was disbanded and assigned as training vessel to the Northumbrian University Royal Navy Unit. 

British patrol vessel Explorer (P164)

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 April 2017

Homeport Kingston-upon-Hull, England. Call sign GABB. Built as the XSV Explorer (A154)by Watercraft Marine/Vosper Thornycroft as an Example tender similar to the Archer-class P2000-type patrol and training vessel. Commissioned on 18 October 1985. Reclassified in 1994 when she was handed over to the British Royal Navy when the Royal Naval Auxiliary Service was disbanded and assigned as training vessel to the Yorkshire Universities Royal Navy Unit.

Displacement 54 tons and as dimensions 20,8 x 5,8 x 1,8 metres. Machinery consists of 2-873bhp Cat C18 ACERT diesels allowing a speed of 22 knots. Designed for a speed of 45 knots depending on the machinery with she is fitted out. Range 550 nautical miles. Crew numbers 12 (operational)-22 (training) persons. Armament 3 General purpose machineguns and if needed 1-2cm Oerlikon cannon. 

Dutch diving vessel Zr. Ms. Argus 1991-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 April 2017

Of the Cerberus-class. Laid down at the Scheepswerf Visser, Den Helder, Netherlands on 16 September 1991, launched on 14 March 1992 and commissioned on 2 June 1992. Dimensions 27,3 (maximum) x 8,76 *maximum) x 1,5 (medium) metres and a displacement of 223 tons. 

German mine hunters Überhernn (M1095) 1986-2016 and Herten (M1099) 1988-2016

Kiel, Germany 26 April 2016

Part of the Type 333 Kulmbach-class consisting of Kulmbach, Überhernn, Passau, Laboe and Herten built as Type 343 Hameln-class minesweepers but converted into Type 333 mine hunters when fitted out with Seefuchs expendable drones which were used to detonate detected mines. Machinery consisted of 2x2.040kW MTU 16V 538 TB91 diesels. Speed 18 knots. Crew numbered 37 men. Armament consisted original of 2-4cm L/70 dual purpose Bofors guns later replaced by 2,7cm MLG 27 remote-controlled auto cannons and

Technical class specifications. With a displacement of 635 tons and as dimensions 54,5 x 9,2 x 2,84 metres or 187.6 x 30.2 x 9.4 feet. 2FIM-92 Stinger MANPADS to launch surface-to-air missiles. Could be used as minelayers.

Überhernn, laid down by Abeking&Rasmussen, Lemwerder, Germany on 15 December 1986, launched on 30 August 1988, commissioned on 19 September 1989 and decommissioned on 30 June 2016. Call sign DRFS.

Herten, launched by Krögerwerft, Rendsburg, Germany on 16 June 1988, launched on 22 December 1989, commissioned on 26 February 1991 and decommissioned on 30 June 2016. Call sign DRFP. 

German coastal mine hunters Weilheim (M 1059) and Homburg (M 1069) 1992-

Kiel, Germany 26 April 2016

Weilheim (M 1059), laid down by A. Lürssen Werft, Vegesack, Germany in December 1995, launched on 26 February 1998 and commissioned on 3 December 1998. Call sign DRFD.

Homburg (M1069), laid down by A. Lürssen Werft, Vegesack, Germany on17 February 1992, launched on 21 April 1994 and commissioned on 15 August 1995. Call sign DRFB. Other sources claims she was built at the Krögerwerft, Rendsbyrg, Geermany and commissioned on 26 September 1995.

Part of the Frankenthal-class consisting of the Frankenthal, Weiden, Rottwell, Bad Bevensen, Bad Rappenau, Grömitz, Datteln, Homburg, Sulzbach-Rosenbger, Fulda and Weilheim preceded by the Hameln-class.

General class technical specifications. Displacement 650 tons and as dimensions 54,5 x 9,2 x 2,6 metres or 178 x 30 x 8.6 feet. Machinery consists of 2x2.040kW MTU 16V 538 TB91 diesels and 2 electric motors to be able to manoeuvre still and slowly. Speed 18 knots. Her crew numbers 41 men. The armament consisted of 1-4cm L70 dual purpose Bofors gun replaced by 1-2,7cm MLG 27 auto cannon, 2FIM-92 Stinger MANPADS to launch surface-to-air missiles and 2 Pinguin B3mine hunting ROV’s. Able to be used as a minelayer. 

German coastal mine hunter Sulzbach-Rosenberg (M1062) 1995-

Kiel, Germany 26 April 2016

Laid down by A. Lürssen Werft, Vegesack, Germany on 1 September 1992, launched on 27 April 1995 and commissioned 23 January 1996. Call sign DREU. Part of the Frankenthal-class consisting of the Frankenthal, Weiden, Rottwell, Bad Bevensen, Bad Rappenau, Grömitz, Datteln, Homburg, Sulzbach-Rosenbger, Fulda and Weilheim preceded by the Hameln-class.

General class technical specifications. Displacement 650 tons and as dimensions 54,5 x 9,2 x 2,6 metres or 178 x 30 x 8.6 feet. Machinery consists of 2x2.040kW MTU 16V 538 TB91 diesels and 2 electric motors to be able to manoeuvre still and slowly. Speed 18 knots. Her crew numbers 41 men. The armament consisted of 1-4cm L70 dual purpose Bofors gun replaced by 1-2,7cm MLG 27 auto cannon, 2FIM-92 Stinger MANPADS to launch surface-to-air missiles and 2 Pinguin B3mine hunting ROV’s. Able to be used as a minelayer. 

German minesweeper Pegnitz (M1090) 1987-

Kiel, Germany 26 April 2016

Call sign DRFT. Laid down by A. Lürssen Werft, Vegesack, Germany on 6 July 1987, launched on 13 March 1989 and commissioned on 8 or 9 March 1990. Of the Ensdorf-class with as sister ships Ensdorf, Auerbach/Oberpfalz, Hameln, Pegnitz and Siegburg, preceded by the Hameln-class. Former Type 343 Hameln-class and modernized into the Type 352 Ensddorf-class and fitted out with the Troika Plus drone system.

General class technical specifications. With a displacement of 650 tons and as dimensions 54,50 x 9,20 x 2,84 metres or 178.5 x 30.2 x 9.4 feet. The machinery consists of 2x2204kW MTU 16V538 TB91 diesels allowing a speed of 18 knots. Crew numbered 45 men. Original armament 2-4cm L/70 dual purpose Bofors guns to be replaced by 2-2,7cm Mauser MLG27 remote-controlled auto cannons and further more FIM-92 Stinger surface-to-airs missiles (MANPADS) and able to be used as minelayer with a capacity of 60 mines. 

French sailing frigate 3rd rate la Psyche (1842) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, laid down at Brest on 14 June 1842, launched on 28 September 1844, wood-built and an armament of 42 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate 3rd rate l’Heliopolis (1830) in 1859

Homeport Toulon, France, laid down at Rochefort, France in August 1830, launched on 25 August 1847, wood-built and an armament of 42 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate 3rd rate l’Isis (1846) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, laid down at Brest on 3 August 1846, launched on 29 July 1851, wood-built and an armament of 42 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate 3rd rate La Jeunne d’Arc (1835) in 1859

Homeport Lorient, France, laid down at Lorient on 26 July 1835, launched on 8 November 1847, wood-built and an armament of 42 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate 3rd rate la Penelope (1830) in 1859

Homeport Lorient, France, laid down at Lorient on 1 September 1830, launched on 25 November 1840, wood-built and an armament of 42 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing frigate l’Erigone 3rd rate (1833) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France, laid down at St. Servan, France on 25 September 1833, launched on 25 September 1836, maintenance at Brest in 1851, wood-built and an armament of 42 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands built none trawlers for Russian account in 1940

On 22 July 1940 was at Amsterdam, Netherlands a meeting to discuss if the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands was able to built trawlers for Russian account. The Russian cabinet ordered on 11 July the building of 5 trawlers via the firm Otto Wolff by the Norderwerft, Hamburg, Germany. The lease treaty between both countries made it possible for Russia to order another 5 trawlers. The Norderwerft had however no capacity left for such order and the firm Wolff wished the transfer to the Dutch shipyard. If the latter agreed, would the firm Wolff be responsible to obtain the permission of the German Wirtschaftsministerium for the necessary credits and clearance of the budget. The needed material was to be delivered out of Germany. The trawlers were to be using the Mayer design (?). Again the firm Wolff was responsible for the needed permission. The building costs were to be paid as follows: 20% 4 weeks after ordering, 20% 4 weeks after laid down of the keels of each ship, 20% 4 weeks after the launching of each ship and40% of the delivery at Hamburg, Germany. The ships were however for an unknown reason never built at Vlissingen, Netherlands.

Note
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (T214), Municipality Archive Vlissingen, inventory number 399C. 

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

German harbour and ocean going tug Kitzeberg 1991-

Kieler Canal, Germany 26 April 2017

Germany-flagged, IMO 9041150, MMSI 211222700 and call sign DLFB. Gross tonnage 201 tons, deadweight 64 tons an dimensions 24,69 (registered)-26,60 (over all) x 9,20 (thrushes) x 3,60 (depth) x 2,60 (minimum)-3,15 (maximum) metres. Speed 11,5 knots. Horsepower 1.320kW.  Bollard pull 25 tons. Laid down by HDW-Nobiskrug GmbH, Rendsburg, Germany with yard number 750on 20 September 1991, launched on 25 April 1992. Sister ship Falckenstein. 

Dutch sailing vessel (ex-Neerlandia 1910-1954, Breemu 1954-1986) Neerlandia 1986-

Kieler Canal, Germany 26 April 2017

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 246099000 and call sign PGED. Koftjalk. Launched by Gebr. I.&G.W. Verstockt, Martenshoek, Netherlands in 1910. Gross tonnage 92,80 tons, net tonnage 70,52 tons, deadweight 135 tons, grain capacity 7.000 cubic feet and as dimensions 25,50 (registered) x 5,20 (moulded) x 1,75 (depth moulded) metres. Motorized in 1928., In 1954 renamed motor ship Breemu. Renamed Neerlandia I 1986. 

Dutch oil/chemical tanker (ex-Multitank Badenia 1997-2010) Lucy Essberger 2010-

Kieler Canal, Germany 26 April 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Dordrecht, Netherlands, IMO 9140827, MMSI 246725000 and call sign PCDJ. Built by ENVC, Viana do Castelo, Portugal in 1997. Ex-Multitank Badenia renamed June 2010. Owned by Wieldrecht Shipping, Dordrecht, Netherlands and managed by Essberger, Hamburg, Germany. 

German diving pram TA 2623

Kieler Canal, Germany 26 April 2017

Germany-flagged and EU no. 05026230. Owned and managed by WSA Kiel-Holtenau, Germany. 

German work boat Regenpfeifer II 1993-

Kieler Canal, Germany 26 April 2017

Germany-flagged and EU No. 05037770. Owned and managed by WSA Kiel-Holtenau, Germany. Built by Aquanatik Yachting, Sneek, Netherlands in 1993 and commissioned in 1994. 

German navy replacing old battleships by new ones according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

Konig-class

Braunschweig-class

An item referred to Die Flotte reporting that this year 3 new battleships König (1), Markgraf (2) and Grosser Kurfürst (3) were to be added to the 3rd squadron which would than number 7 dreadnoughts. The Preussen (4) and Lotharingen (5) of the 2nd squadron were to be disarmed with a s result that this squadron would just number 6 battleships.

Notes
1. Part of the König-class consisting of the König, Grosser Kurfürst, Markgraf and Kronprinz. Preceded by the Kaiser-class and succeeded by the Bayern-class. Building ordered as the “S”, laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft, Wilhelmshaven, Germany with yard number 33 in October 1911, launched on 1 March 1913, commissioned on 9 August 1914, sea trials completed on 23 November 1914 and scuttled by her own crew at Gutter Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles, Scotland on 21 June 1919. Never raised. Building costs 45 million Goldmarks.
2. Part of the König-class consisting of the König, Grosser Kurfürst, Markgraf and Kronprinz. Preceded by the Kaiser-class and succeeded by the Bayern-class. Building ordered as the Ersatz Weissenburg, laid down at AG Weser Shipyard, Bremen, Germany with yard number 186 in November 1911, launched on 4 June 1913, commissioned on 1 October 1914 and scuttled by her own crew at Gutter Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles, Scotland on 21 June 1919. Building costs 45 million Goldmarks.
3. Part of the König-class consisting of the König, Grosser Kurfürst, Markgraf and Kronprinz. Preceded by the Kaiser-class and succeeded by the Bayern-class. Building ordered as the Ersatz Kurfürst Friedrich Wilhelm, laid down at the AG Vulkan shipyard, Hamburg, Germany with yard number 4 in October 1911, launched on 5 May 1913, dockyards trials on 15 July 1914, commissioned on 30 July 1914 and scuttled by her own crew at Gutter Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles, Scotland on 21 June 1919. Raised on 29 April 1938 and sold to be broken up at Rosyth. Building costs 45 million Goldmarks.
4. Of the Braunschweig-class, laid down by AG Vulkan, Stettin, Germany in April 1902, launched on 30 October 1903, commissioned on 12 July 1905 and partly, broken up in 1931
5. Of the Braunschweig-class, laid down by Schichau, Danzig, Germany in December 1902, launched on 27 May 1905, commissioned on 18 May 1906 and sold to be broken up in 1931. 

British Royal Navy continued with building battleships of the Royal Sovereign and Queen Elizabeth-classes according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

Royal Sovereign or Revenge-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

An item referred to the Engineering dated 17th April reported that the same year 3 battleships of the Royal Sovereign-class with an armament of 8-38,1cm guns and further more 15,2cm guns were to be laid down for the British Royal Navy. The armament was similar to the Queen Elizabeth-class but the displacement was smaller and the speed lower. Further more was one battleship of the British Queen Elizabeth-class to be laid down. The result was that in 3 years time 8 battleships with a speed of 21 miles and 6 with a speed of 25 miles were built, all with a main armament of 38,1cm guns. 

British Royal Navy seemed to use the small cruisers as escort vessels against submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau No. 13 referring to British newspapers that the intention was to use the small 4.500 tons cruisers more as escort vessels for battleships lacking a secondary armament of 15cm guns than as ‘destroyer of destroyers’. The cruisers were less protected against torpedo attacks than the battleships and the newspapers wondered if the cruisers could be successful of keeping submarines away from the battleships. 

British cruiser HMS Undaunted superior to German cruiser SMS Regensburg according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

German SMS Graudenz

An item referred to the The Navy Gazette which claimed that the small British cruiser HMS Undaunted (1) with an armament of 2-15cm guns and 8-10,2cm guns and a speed of 30 miles was expected to be superior to the German cruiser SMS Regensburg.(2)

Notes
1. Of the Arethusa-class light cruisers, laid down by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Govan, Scotland on 21 December 1912, launched on 28 April 1914, commissioned in August 1914 and sold to be broken up on 9 April 1923, speed 28,5 knots and a main armament of 2x1-15,2cm/6” Mk XII guns and6x1-10,2cm/4” Mk V quick firing guns.
2. Of the Graudenz-class, laid down at theAG Weser shipyard, Bremen, Germany in 1912, launched on 24 April 1014, commissioned on 3 January 1915, handed over to France on 4 June 1920, renamed Strasbourg and finally scuttled in Lorient in 1944. ith a speed of 27,5 knots and a main armament of 12-10,5cm L/45 quick firing guns in 1917 replaced by 7-15cm L/45 quick firing guns. 

The conning towers of the French Normandie-class battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 4

Normandie-class

An item referred to the Moniteur de la la Flotte dated 6 June reporting that the conning towers of the French Normandie-class battleships (1) would consist of 3 floors. The lowest was to be used for as a communication centre for transferring orders, the middle to locate the navigation devices and the highest floor, which was rotating, for the fire control and range finders. The result was an weight increase with about 60 tons.

Note
1. The Normandie-class 25.230 tons battleships to consist of the Normandie, Flandre, Gascogne, Languedoc and Béarn, preceded by the Bretagne-class and succeeded by the planned but not realized Lyon-class and the actual built Dunkerque-class was to consist of 5 units of which just one the Béarn was completed although as an aircraft carrier. The main armament was to consist of 4x3-34cm/13” /45 Modè 1912 guns. The conning tower was to be protected by 30cm/12” thick armour. 

Tuesday, 18 April 2017

German general cargo ship (ex-Lekstroom 2002-2002, Normed Izmir 2002-2005, Osterbotten 2005-2007, Balticon Antwerp 2007-2009) Österbotten 2009-



Kieler Canal, Germany 26 April 2016

Isle of Man-flagged, homeport Douglas, Isle of Man, IMO 9247120, MMSI 235008920 and call sign MHYJ3. Owned and managed by Worden Schiffahrtkontor, Oldendorf, Germany. Built by Zaliv Shipyard, Kerch, Ukraine in 2002.